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Spectropop - Digest Number 1483



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Jordan Bros
           From: Dave O'Gara 
      2. Re: Reading music
           From: Steve Harvey 
      3. Wishful Linking.
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. Jerry Ganey
           From: Gary Myers 
      5. Re: Buying reissue CDs
           From: superoldies 
      6. Re: Reading music
           From: Joe Nelson 
      7. Rick Lancelot and Estelle Bennett
           From: Sean 
      8. Re: Reading music
           From: Gary Myers 
      9. Four Tops / Knickerbockers
           From: Mick Patrick 
     10. Re: EMI stereo
           From: Wes Smith 
     11. Re: Projection location
           From: Al Kooper 
     12. Re: Buying reissue CDs
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     13. Re: Les Scopitones
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     14. The Sands Of Time
           From: S'pop Team 
     15. Re: Help Me R(h)onda
           From: Richard Hattersley 
     16. Marketts on TV
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     17. Re: Four Tops
           From: Martin Jensen 


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Message: 1 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 14:57:49 -0000 From: Dave O'Gara Subject: Re: Jordan Bros Country Paul wrote: > I checked out www.thejordanbrothers.com as recommended by Al Q. > "Heart" audio comes up on the main page (they say it wasn't a 45, > but why is the song so familiar?) "The Things I Didn't Say" is > also sampled (good record), and there claims to be a link to a > sample of "Gimme Some Lovin'" (#3 in Boston, it claims), but it > wouldn't open. I just may spring for the Greatest Hits CD.... The song Heart that sounds familiar to you charted in 1963 by Kenny Chandler, on Laurie Records I believe. A very popular record here in central Massachusetts. The clip of the Jordan Brothers singing that song is very faithful to the Chandler version. (By the way, Does anyone have any info on Kenny Chandler? What else did he do and is he still in the business?)...................... Regarding Gimme Some Lovin', it did indeed chart top ten on WBZ-AM in Boston and other New England radio stations..and I agree their song samples sound intriguing. I had only been familiar with Gimme Some Lovin' so I may "spring" for the CD also. Dave 0' -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 09:39:01 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Reading music Will Stos wrote: > Here's a question for some experts: I've read a lot > of profiles on session singers who cut demos, only > to have other performers cover them faithfully and > have hits (ie. the Chiffons over-dubbing Little Eva > on "One Fine Day," or Valerie Simpson cutting records > for Diana Ross' early solo material). Was this very > common? Copycatting was not that unknown back in the day. If you wanted to have an artist cover your tune you tried to come up with a demo that sounded as close to their style. Otis Blackwell often emulated Elvis's records in order to pitch his tunes to the Big E. It worked, judging from the number of tunes Elvis covered that were Otis's tunes. I don't think it had much to do with whether an artist could read music or not. The less work you made for an artist the more likely they were to cover your tunes. Sometimes marketing had something to do with who got the record out. Huey Piano Smith and the Clowns did "Sea Cruise", but the label figured a white artist had a greater chance at a hit and wiped out the vocal track. In comes Frankie Ford and the hit is now remembered as one of his tunes. How about Darlene Love doing "He's a Rebel" only to have it come out under the Crystals name? Was it a matter of getting the tunes out in time to beat out Vicki Carr's version or the fact that the Crystals had more name recognition than Darlene? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 09:42:53 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Wishful Linking. Mick Patrick wrote: > The Knickerbockers' "Wishful Thinking" is one fabulous > record, if you like Spectoresque Righteous Brothers-style > epics, which I do. When I first picked up the Knickerbockers lp with "Lies" it was "Wishful Thinking" that really stood out. It wasn't much of a surprise to find out later that the singer was Bill Medley's replacement in the Brothers when Bill went solo. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 10:35:19 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Jerry Ganey Mick Patrick: > ... back to my new Jerry Ganey 45 ... Hey, I know him! Jerry Gee (Ganey) & the Rousers followed us into a club in South Gate (CA) around '65 - '66, and then at some point we were both at that club, alternating sets - probably for a week or two. Then, once around the late 70's (I think), I auditioned for a gig with them, and then, sometimes around the late 80's, I came across him, still playing clubs, in the South Bay area here, which is where I think he was based all the time. I also remember him doing a local TV show with one of his releases, probably around late 60's. I've also run across the sax player (Rudy something) from the Rousers a couple of times since the 60's. And, speaking of the Knickerbockers, we did their off-night at the Red Velvet in Hollywood for a few weeks, shortly before "Lies", but I think I've already mentioned that in here several weeks ago. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 17:10:42 -0000 From: superoldies Subject: Re: Buying reissue CDs The SLOWEST service I've found of all of the mail-order/reissue companies is Collectables. Unless you get their $7.50 1st class service expect the CDs to take their 14 days. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 16:28:09 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Reading music Will Stos wrote: > Here's a question for some experts: I've read a lot > of profiles on session singers who cut demos, only > to have other performers cover them faithfully and > have hits (ie. the Chiffons over-dubbing Little Eva > on "One Fine Day," or Valerie Simpson cutting records > for Diana Ross' early solo material). Was this very > common? It's fairly common. I'd say most rock artists are either unable to read music or generally don't, since it's a genre that bases itself mainly on the feel of the moment. Being able to copy the demo exactly is more a matter of memorization than anything else. About a week and a half ago, a local radio station did a contest that parodied American Idol. One girl was in the studio, singing Mariah Carey's "Love Takes Time". She sang it perfectly - but it was note- for-note faithful to the CD. I was thinking "yeah, but what does this have to do with you? Stripped down to the basic melody without any grace notes, what would you do to that melody to make it yours? Elvis Presley tended to copy his demos exactly, yet could reinterpret with the best of them. I'd say the general answer to your question is this: in a genre where most performers know little about the mechanics of music, it's harder to ignore your ears and use your mind than it is to depend on your ears and do what you're told. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 22:15:42 -0000 From: Sean Subject: Rick Lancelot and Estelle Bennett What happened to these two? I saw a few of Rick Lancelot's singles on the web but it says that they are promotional copies so they were probably never released. And he recorded under 20th Century, some of his songs were "Heartbreak Train" "That's My Bag" and "For You". I also have seen him on Shindig! and Shivaree. Now with Estelle she was in the Ronettes, only on a few songs but still was a Ronette. Anyone know what these two are doing? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 11:27:07 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Reading music Will Stos: > I've read a lot of profiles on session singers who cut demos, > only to have other performers cover them faithfully and have > hits ... Was this very common? I would say yes. > ... was this done with performers who couldn't sight-read music, > or read music altogether? Does anyone know of performers who can > only learn by ear? >From my own standpoint, although I know a lot about music (played professionally since 1960, a few different instruments, & I'm the author of a chord book), my sight reading sucks and I would MUCH rather learn something by ear than to read it. I think it's a safe bet that most pop/rock singers who are not known for playing an instrument (and probably some who are) are probably not good readers. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 10:12:10 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Four Tops / Knickerbockers Me: > The Knickerbockers' "Wishful Thinking" is one fabulous record, > if you like Spectoresque Righteous Brothers-style epics, which > I do. I only have the track on CD. Some of you have it on vinyl, > I'm sure. I'm hoping a producer and/or arranger gets a label > credit. Do tell. Thanks. Jeffrey Mlinscek: > Here is the lowdown. > Arranged by Leon Russell > Produced by Jerry Fuller > Written by Wynn Stewart Thanks for the info, Jeffrey. Leon Russell and Jerry Fuller, eh? No wonder it's so good. Talking of Spector soundalikes... Could someone please tell me who produced the Four Tops' "Wonderful Baby". It was the B-side of their version of "If I Were A Carpenter". Alas, I don't have that 45. Thanking you. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 03:05:31 -0000 From: Wes Smith Subject: Re: EMI stereo Mikey wrote: > George Martin did The Beatles that way because he wanted the option > of compressing the vocals or instruments independently, to get a > harder sound. With Cliff and the Shads, the sound was more > orchestrated, rather than pure rock like The Beatles, and lent > itself better to true stereo mixes. I love the Shads in stereo. > That's one band and one instance where nobody can say the mono > sounds better -- it doesn't. The Shads in stereo is a fantastic > listening experience. Listen to the stereo Wonderful Land with the > strings -- it doesn't get better than that. Mikey...I positively echo your thoughts on "WONDERFUL LAND". One of the best instrumentals I've ever heard(and I love a few hundred of them). Wes Smith P.S.---And yes, the super stereo really brings it out even moreso. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 05:54:05 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Projection location > I always loved that Blues Project photo with the members posed > behind one of those playground climbing things. Just looks like > a natural setting (foredrop?) for a band photo. > In fact, the playground in my apartment complex has one of those > and I've long been tempted to have my picture taken peering from > behind it, ala the Project. If I ever started a band, it would > definitely be utilized. Now THAT was shot in the West Village. The exact spot escapes me. AK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 14:03:11 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: Buying reissue CDs Michael Godin: > I find Collectors Choice Music to be very helpful myself. I have > been buying from them for over five years, and have always been > found their service, delivery and prices to my satisfaction. James Botticelli: > I find their delivery incredibly slow which is why they are always > my last resort...the websites pump 'em out quick... Al Kooper: > uhhhh...Collector's Choice has a website.... They're slower than > Donald Rumsfield owning up. I try to avoid to buy anything by Collectors Choice. I have a Christmas compilation with absolutely no credits to songwriters, publishers or production dates. Besides their reissue artworks are hideous most of the time. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 15:11:15 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: Les Scopitones Phil M: > Scopitones on DVD, at http://scopitones.com Grey market. I haven't > seen any of these transfers (yet!), but am told they are excellent. Thanks for the link. Very interesting site. Ive watched the scopitone of the day. The quality seems to be quite okay. plus 20 bucks is fair for a dvd with 20 songs. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 10:23:41 +0100 From: S'pop Team Subject: The Sands Of Time Plucked from the S'pop Public Bulletin Board: Does anyone have info on Tony Hatch-produced group the Sands Of Time and their 1967 song "Where Did We Go Wrong" on Pye Records? I think this was only released in England, and they are not the North American group of the same name. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 15:02:38 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Re: Help Me R(h)onda Charles Ulrich wrote: > And then there was the theme from It's Gary Shandling's Show, > which was apparently based on the guitar lick from "Help Me, > Rhonda". Steve Harvey reckoned: > It's actually a uke, not a guitar that plays the signature lick. I think it's guitar on Help Me Rhonda but ukelele on Help Me Ronda. Richard www.wiz.to/richardsnow -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 15:08:30 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Marketts on TV I've seen that The Marketts appeared on two episodes of Where The Action Is in 1966. Does anyone of you 'poppers have a clue if they appeared there in person and if so, who these persons were (since the group consisted of studio musicians as far as I know)??? Appreciate any help on this. Frankman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 16 May 2004 14:57:00 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Re: Four Tops Mick Patrick wrote: > Talking of Spector soundalikes... Could someone please tell me > who produced the Four Tops' "Wonderful Baby". It was the B-side > of their version of "If I Were A Carpenter". Alas, I don't have > that 45. Thanking you. I have the "Four Tops - Until You Love Someone, more of the best (1965-1970)" CD comp issued by Rhino in 93. According to the booklet Smokey Robinson both wrote and produced 'Wonderful Baby'. Killer song by the way! with regards Martin, Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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