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Spectropop - Digest Number 1480



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Linda Glenn; Ohio Express redux; Lost Nite; more
           From: Country Paul 
      2. Re: buying reissue CDs
           From: Superoldies 
      3. Re: Posthumous overdubs
           From: Nick Archer 
      4. Hippies
           From: Kingsley Abbott 
      5. Re: David Gates = The Manchesters
           From: Craig Davison 
      6. Yodar, Bob Lind
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      7. Re: Carson & Gaile
           From: Phil X. Milstein 
      8. L.A. session musicians
           From: Charles Ulrich 
      9. Re: New York Rock Ensemble
           From: Jim Shannon 
     10. Re: Mamas & Papas musicians / Klaus Voorman
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     11. Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow"
           From: Austin Roberts 
     12. Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow"
           From: Gary Myers 
     13. Re: Posthumous overdubs
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     14. Re: Beach Boy Meets 'Duck' on Cartoon Network
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     15. WISH/WABC survey format
           From: Country Paul 
     16. Four Esquires/Paris label; Jordan Bros.; Ersel Hickey; "Nashlinks"
           From: Country Paul 
     17. The Excellents
           From: Paul Levinson 
     18. Re: L.A. session musicians
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     19. Re: Mamas & Papas musicians
           From: Al Kooper 
     20. Re: Peter Antell, John Linde and the Percells
           From: Mick Patrick 
     21. Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow"
           From: Paul Levinson 
     22. Les Scopitones
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     23. Re: C. Carson Parks
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     24. Re: Dobie Gillis Theme
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     25. Reading music
           From: Will Stos 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 02:05:46 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Linda Glenn; Ohio Express redux; Lost Nite; more "New" business: I have what I believe to be an obscure 45 on Gold Arrow (#211) by Linda Glenn - "'Til Tomorrow," the sentimental waltz from the show "Fiorello." It's arranged by "Jimmy Haskell," and probably dates to 1960-62 or so. (Gold Arrow was one of myriad little labels distributed through Circa in the west coast, the largest probably being Indigo.) Ms. Glenn sounds like a moppet prodigy with an immense voice (although occasionally in search of the pitch); the record is totally devoid of irony, but is somehow sweet, poignant and brassy at the same time. Anyone know anything about Linda Glenn? Still catching up... paferra: > If you'd like to bring back the flavor (so as to get them nasty old > '7T's' out of your mouth) to what you've been chewing all these years, > just listen to this: http://www.marstalent.com/bio_ohio_express.htm > Some things REALLY never change :) Yow - this is scary! Time warp or what?!? Re: Lost Nite Records' Gary Stevens album, that label used to release collections of oldies and market the same ones to different local DJs or stations with their own custom covers; so there could be several versions of a particular album with the same contents. Although specializing in oldies reissues, Lost Nite did indeed have contemporary records - even hits, including the Visions' "A Teenager's Life" in 1960 or 61, possibly their first release. Earlier: > ...[T]he band was in fact originally known as Bloos Magoos. I > clearly recall them being talked about under that name in the > pages of "Hit Parader" for some time before "We Ain't Got Nothin' > Yet" came out.... I remember seeing a signboard for them playing a gig in Greenwich Village as "Bloos." Bill Reed, beautiful obit for Priscilla Paris. Damn shame it had to be written.... Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 07:09:02 -0000 From: Superoldies Subject: Re: buying reissue CDs I find Amazon, GEMM, MusicStack, eBay and Hepcat Records the best places for best prices if you know what you are looking for. The seemingly top reissue label (I check each site out individually) are: ACE (UK) Collectables Taragon Sundazed Collector's Choice Music Raven Records (Australia) Rev-Ola (UK) Varese Sarabande (Vintage) Rhino Bear Family (Germany) Norton Records Buffalo Bop (Holland) Repertoire (UK) Del-Fi, Eric, Hip-O do occasional releases (not as often as these others). All have websites I believe - I haven't seen a lone site myself that reviews all new "oldies" releases. CCM is good for info, but only with what they carry. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 06:21:56 -0500 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Posthumous overdubs Kurt: > I would reckon that "posthumous overdubbing" is always done to some > degree following the untimely deaths of substantial (and profitable) > musicians... provided there are recordings left to embellish. I used to produce radio commercials for RCA Nashville in the early 80's. They released a posthumous Elvis album, "Guitar Man". The RCA contact told me that they had redone all of the tracks around Elvis' vocals, and that it was really hard keeping up with the timing changes in his vocals. She also mentioned that they got Jerry Reed to come back in as part of the band. A funny thing. When I delivered the spots for approval through the back lobby of the RCA building on Music Row, there was no one in the hall between Studio A and the lobby. I was leaning on a handtruck of two inch master tapes waiting for someone, when I noticed that the handtruck was loaded with original Elvis two inch master tapes! The thought of rolling them away did cross my mind, but I stuck it out til the secretary showed up. Nick "Could Have Retired By Now" Archer Nashville TN -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 11:22:33 +0100 From: Kingsley Abbott Subject: Hippies Having established the Jazz rooted hipsters, and the positive sounding Orlons East Coast hippies, the first mention I can recall of the West Coast variety was in Buzz & Bucky's (aka Cason & Wilkin of the Ronny & The Daytonas studio gang) "Tiger-A-Go-Go" single from 1965. Lyrically they met 'a California Hippie, who said come along with me, gonna get you to the Tiger on time" - The Tiger being a (presumably) hip club in SF. They certainly did use the term 'Hippie' in SF at that time (ref 'Death Of A Hippie March' later). Kingsley (from his Antique '32 Studebaker Dictator Coupe) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 14:34:29 -0000 From: Craig Davison Subject: Re: David Gates = The Manchesters Martin Roberts wrote: > Phil M., in a flurry of writing activity almost in the Country Paul > tradition, asked about any vocal skeletons that may be lurking in Mr. > Gates' wardrobe. Playing on musica, The Manchesters "I Don't Come > From England" (VJ), written, arranged and, as I've always understood, > sung by David Gates. It was available on eBay for $5 a pop for quite some time. Looks like someone in Florida found a big bunch of them. Weird novelty tune with basso and falsetto vocals. Flip side is a novelty instrumental as I recall. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 20:25:56 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Yodar, Bob Lind Unfortunately I haven't heard Thresholds Of Love (by The Vision on Uni) but knowing that Yodar Critch (**of course I can't find my Whitburn book now, figures**) was a pseudonym for either Gary Zekley or one of his fellow pop producer-penners and that Critch, Zekley and Don Grady all were part of The Yellow Balloon, it's a safe bet that it's a good tune. "Don't Be Concerned" is actually the title of Bob Lind's debut World Pacific album containing "Elusive Butterfly", "Cheryl's Going Home", "Truly Julie's Blues", etc. The Verve LP was (at least in the States) simply called "Bob Lind". THe overdubbing may sound awkward but I love this LP, especially because he sings "Hard Road" and I still don't know which, if any, LP Peter, Paul & Mary recorded this great folk song on. Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 22:53:42 -0400 From: Phil X. Milstein Subject: Re: Carson & Gaile Frank Jastfelder wrote: > I purchased the single recently but have to burn it on cd yet. I'll > let you know when I found the time (but this could take a few weeks). > A friend told me that Carson is the brother of Van Dyke Parks. Isn't > that ironic, you bring out some critically acclaimed albums, work > with a genius (Brian), and your brother writes one little ditty and > gets rich. Does anyone have a clue if Carson composed more noteworthy > songs? And who's Gaile BTW? I hope you do get to copy out that track to musica at some point, I'm very anxious to hear it. Gaile was Gaile Foote, a fellow member (as was, for a while, Carson's brother V.D. Parks) of his Greenwood County Singers. If I'm not mistaken Carson & Gaile were husband & wife at the time of their duet recordings, but I could be mistaken. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 18:38:19 -0700 From: Charles Ulrich Subject: L.A. session musicians I hope to identify the musicians in a couple of photos of Frank Zappa sessions. Can anyone help? The photo at http://members.shaw.ca/fz-pomd2/pics/fohorns.jpg is from Freak Out! (1966). In addition to Mothers Elliot Ingber and Roy Estrada, it shows two French horn players. Presumably these are Arthur Maebe and George Price, but which one is which? The photo at http://members.shaw.ca/fz-pomd2/pics/lgsession.jpg is from Lumpy Gravy (recorded 1967, released 1968). Aside from the silhouette of someone in the booth and FZ with his hands up, I see eleven people in the photo. The following people are reported to have participated in sessions for Lumpy Gravy: February 1967: Esther Roth (OM) John Guerin (drums) James Helms [a.k.a. Jim Haynes?] (guitar) Bob West (bass guitar) Jimmy Bond (bass) Kenneth Watson (tympani, mallets) Thomas Poole (percussion) Paul Smith (piano) March 1967: Sid Sharp (contractor) Mike Lang, Lincoln Mayorga, Pete Jolly (keyboards) Frankie Capp, Shelly Manne (drums) Emil Richards, Gene Estes, Alan Estes, Victor Feldman (percussion) Ted Nash, Jules Jacob, John Rotella, Don Christlieb, Gene Cipriano (woodwinds) Arthur Maebe, Vincent De Rosa, Richard Parisi, Arthur Briegleb, David Duke, George Price (French horns) Jimmy Zito (trumpet) Kenneth Shroyer, Lew McCreary (trombone) Tommy Tedesco, Tony Rizzi, Al Viola, Dennis Budimer (guitar) Bob West, John Balkin, Jimmy Bond, Lyle Ritz, Chuck Berghofer (bass) Alexander Koltun, Tibor Zelig, Ralph Schaeffer, Bernard Kundell, William Kurasch, James Getzoff, Phillip Goldberg, Leonard Selic, Arnold Belnick, Leonard Malarsky, Harold Ayres, Jerome Reisler, Harry Hyams, Joseph DiFiore, Jerry Kessler, Raymond Kelley, Joseph Saxon, Jesse Ehrlich, Harold Bemko (strings) Joan Steele, Robert M. Calderwood, Russell N. Brown, Vincent Bartold, Jack DuLong, Robert Ross, R.D. McMickle, C.D. Goodwin, John Donahue (copyists) Thanks for any help you can provide. --Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 14:12:46 -0000 From: Jim Shannon Subject: Re: New York Rock Ensemble Me: > Does anyone know if New York Rock Ensemble ever released a single > called "Beside you" . I came across the song on a special CD set > and its georgeous soft ballad with vocals by Mike Kamen. I know > they were originally signed by Columbia in the late sixties. This > song comes off an LP called "Roll Over". Clark Besch: > You came across one of my totally all time fave 45s! YES, "Beside > You" was a 45 hitting (where else?) the Wichita, Kansas charts in > January, 1971... Can you fill me in on the Cd you have it on and > what else is on it? The Double CD set I ordered was on Sony Music Special Products. "Two Classic Albums" fro the New Rock Ensemble: "Roll Over" and "Freedom Burger". Both "Beside You" and 'Fields of Joy" are found on "Roll Over". Mike Kamen is the lead vocalist but also plays oboe. I am impressed with your enclycopedic knowledge of "pop" and enjoy reading your dispatches. So glad, we have you as part of the S' pop group. Jim Shannon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 20:20:34 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: Mamas & Papas musicians / Klaus Voorman Mike McKay: > Eric Hord (aka "the Doctor") was the Mamas and Papas' road guitarist. > That's him filling in on guitar for the flute solo of "California > Dreamin'" in the "Monterey Pop" movie. I'm pretty sure he recorded > with them also. I only have three albums by the MATP. Their first, their third and their last. On the former the credits are like I wrote. On the latter it's Earl Palmer and Ed Greene on drums, David T. Walker, Louie Shelton and Don Peake on guitar, Tony Newton on bass and Jim Horn on flute and sax again. Papa John is on keys with Joe Sample and Clarence McDonald. BTW I think their swansong "People Like Us" has some brilliant moments. And isn't that Hal Blaine playing drums in Monterey? I wrote: > Voorman brought out his biography in Germany in October of last year. > It's called "Why Don't You Play 'Imagine' On The White Piano, John?" > (sic). I have no clue if there's a translated version for the English > market yet. It has 327 pages, and was well-received over here. Phil M: > Frank, I'll buy you a copy of the book if you'll translate it into > English for us! I don't sink sis is a good idea. Maybe you taking service of computer translation software for best results. ;-) Frank "The Kraut" Jastfelder -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 15:19:27 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow" Ed, Logically I agree with you, but magically, I'm not so sure. There was something about this record that struck me as a bit different than any other record of its ilk. Somewhat like the magic of the obviously Dionesque Little Star by the Elegants. The oddity of this arrangement (Over The Rainbow, especially vocally), just like what Michael Brown did with several of the Left Bankes' cuts, strikes me as an odd originality and majesty seldom found in pop music. In other words, I LOVE THIS RECORD! See you soon, Austin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 21:13:15 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow" Previously: > The only thing I didn't care for on The Demensions' version is > the fact that chords they used on the bridge do not accomodate > the actual melody. Austin Roberts: > ... the lead male singer/arranger (the arranger part being the > most important where this record is concerned), was just a kid > when he put this record together, and it sounds like he just let > his muse take him wherever. There is a certain magic to the record Yes, there is. However, speaking again of the chords, I also remember that they used a IVm (or iv, if you prefer) in a place in the verse where the actual melody is the major 3rd. But then the Ventures actually did "Walk Don't Run" mostly incorrectly, too, and look at what a huge influence that was - including to me! :-) gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 04:41:33 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Posthumous overdubs The most infamous "posthumous overdubbing" I have heard is Norman Petty overdubbing the Fireballs over Buddy Holly's home demos to create "new" recordings in the early 60's. The problem is some of these arrangements sound quickly done with little feel for what was on his home demos. The Fireballs were a fine band but I wonder what these recordings would have sounded like had Petty used the Crickets (who were under contract with Liberty by then and couldnt be used) and taken more time. Another overdubbing "project" I cant stand is on the Vogues Reprise "Greatest Hits" LP where they overdubbed a huge orchestra over the groups original mono Co & Ce recordings. While the sound is fuller (I guess you can call them "true stereo" mixes) the overblown arrangements stick out badly. Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 05:05:48 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Beach Boy Meets 'Duck' on Cartoon Network Karen Andrew wrote: > I don't have cable (or I'd be a certifiable couch potato) so I'm > curious about the Cartoon Network's hit series "Duck Dodgers". Is > this cartoon for adults? Otherwise, why would little kids know who > Brian Wilson is? I think this is great if the intended audience > knows who Brian is and are fans of his and the Beach Boys music. Exposing kids to GOOD music via cartoons and kids shows is fine with me since most "for kids" music out there is britney spears inspired pap. I know some They Might Be Giants fans who first heard the duo's music on WB's "Anamaniacs" cartoon series in the early 90's. I just hope this "Brian" character wont be a overwieght bearded alien, pig or duck wearing a bathrobe sitting at a piano! The show is a lot of fun - the campy opening theme is sung none other than Tom Jones, and the animation and writing is a notch above other shows on Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. If you love the original Chuck Jones/Loony Toons shorts I think you will enjoy it. Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 01:42:11 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: WISH/WABC survey format Some "old business" from Dan Hughes: > I grew up in Indianapolis, and the local top 40 station WISH (became > WIFEin late '63) printed a weekly survey that was 7 inches square. In > other words, the same size as a 45 jacket! So it fit right in with > the singlesyou bought each week (nobody bought albums yet--this was > pre-Beatles). One side of the survey had a picture of a 45 rpm record > on it; the other side had the chart, which consisted of, if I remember > correctly, the week's top 50, plus a couple of Picks to Click, plus > the Album of the Week (which for the longest time, I remember, was > the Limeliters Tonight In Person). WABC used a similar format in NYC - the 45 had a "custom label" for the station and pictures of the DJ's and their times on the air around the edge. The back had the Top 77, a pick hit, each DJ's pick, and a think some other songs plus an album of the week - all in fairly small print! (And the album wasn't the Limeliters!) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 01:42:13 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Four Esquires/Paris label; Jordan Bros.; Ersel Hickey; "Nashlinks" Al Kooper: > Wally [Gold] was in The Four Esquires, discovered and produced > KANSAS and wrote "It's Now Or Never" and I'm pretty sure "It's > My Party". Also produced Streisand & Jerry Vale. He passed away > a few years ago. Another great guy. Lived in Jersey. The Four Esquires were a close-harmony group similar to The Four Lads; weren't they on Paris Records for their career? As I remember it was a quite a prolific label, mostly middle-road pop. They also had some tracks with Rosemary June, who I remember as "yourbasic girl singer"; one of the best was a Betty Johnson-like rock ballad version of "I'll Always Be In Love With You." I think she was also on the Four Esquires hit "Always And Forever." Any information on the Paris label? (I'd thought Wally Gold was part of it somehow.) I checked out www.thejordanbrothers.com as recommended by Al Q. "Heart" audio comes up on the main page (they say it wasn't a 45, but why is the song so familiar?) "The Things I Didn't Say" is also sampled (good record), and there claims to be a link to a sample of "Gimme Some Lovin'" (#3 in Boston, it claims), but it wouldn't open. I just may spring for the Greatest Hits CD.... Gary Myers, sad to hear about Ersel Hickey; hope he's doing better. I was just listening to "Bluebirds Over The Mountain" a couple of days ago; he didn't need more that 1:20 to say everything that needed to be said. A haiku-sized work of genius, IMO. Nick Archer: > There's a great web site that I stumbled upon - Nashville Combos > of the 50s-70s, at http://nashlinks.com/sixties.htm Chip Curley, > a combo member, put up the site. Many pictures, and don't miss the > bands' business cards at the bottom. I especially like "The > Ministers Of Sound- Specialists In The Field Of Music". Great find, Nick! My favorite group name, from the 70s page: "Most Valuable Players." It's so obvious - why didn't anyone think of that before?!? Closing note to Peter G. and Al Kooper - when last I looked, the Jahn's Ice Cream in downtown Union, NJ is still there! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 06:52:32 -0000 From: Paul Levinson Subject: The Excellents Peter Grad: > I'm afraid I never heard of the Excellents... but I will see if > I can pick up their record as well... Country Paul: > "Coney Island Baby" and "You Baby You" (a remake of the Cleftones > classic) was a great two-sided hit on Blast in 1961-62. Right. The Excellents sounded a lot like The Channels' "The Closer You Are." The Excellents dropped by Poe Park near Fordham Road on the Grand Concourse in the Bronx in June 1963, and sung a few songs, free of charge and a cappella. That pulsing falsetto from "Coney Island Baby" bounced right off the hot sky and into my brain, where it's still rolling around. (The only guy in the group I slightly knew, though, was Izzy, who sang bass.) All best, Paul www.sff.net/people/paullevinson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 10:45:15 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: L.A. session musicians Charles Ulrich: > I hope to identify the musicians in a couple of photos of Frank Zappa > sessions. Can anyone help? > > The photo at http://members.shaw.ca/fz-pomd2/pics/fohorns.jpg is > from Freak Out! (1966). In addition to Mothers Elliot Ingber and Roy > Estrada, it shows two French horn players. Presumably these are > Arthur Maebe and George Price, but which one is which? > > The photo at http://members.shaw.ca/fz-pomd2/pics/lgsession.jpg is > from Lumpy Gravy (recorded 1967, released 1968). Aside from the > silhouette of someone in the booth and FZ with his hands up, I see > eleven people in the photo. The only one I know for sure on the picture from the Lumpy Gravy session is Dennis Budimir (that's his correct spelling). He's fourth to left from Zappa (the one with the short sleeved black shirt in the foreground). Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 05:02:39 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Mamas & Papas musicians Me: > I thought at some point they recorded with their road band, of which > I know"fast" Eddie Hoh was the excellent drummer. Maybe Elliott > Ingber on guitar? Mike McKay: > Eric Hord (aka "the Doctor") was the Mamas and Papas' road guitarist. > That's him filling in on guitar for the flute solo of "California > Dreamin'" in the "Monterey Pop" movie. I'm pretty sure he recorded > with them also. What he said. I meant Eric Hord.... Can we fill in a bass player and keyboardist? We got the frummer & guitarist so far ("Fast" Eddie Hoh, Eric "The Doctor" Hord). Old Al Kooper -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 21:36:41 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Peter Antell, John Linde and the Percells The S'pop Team: > S'pop are pleased to announce the publication of a brand new > feature by John Clemente, author of that essential tome "Girl > Groups: Fabulous Females That Rocked The World". The article > documents the careers of Long Island-based girl group the > Percells and the songwriting/production team Pete Antell and > John Linde. Read it here: > http://www.spectropop.com/percells/index.htm I'm sure all S'poppers will join me in thanking John for another great article. I met up with Pete Antell in London a few years back, and had a great time hearing all his Bob Crewe stories and suchlike. Some weeks later a cassette arrived for me from NY containing a few rare Linde/Antell productions. Best of the lot was a rare Cousin Brucie Morrow radio jingle from 1963, performed by the Percells and the Valrays. After much searching, I located the tape. Hear the jingle @ musica: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Love that 1964 pic of Pete - what a heartthrob! Hey la, Mick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 07:00:44 -0000 From: Paul Levinson Subject: Re: Demensions' "Over The Rainbow" Austin Roberts: > I was told by a musician friend of mine from Brooklyn who knows > the lead male singer/arranger (the arranger part being the most > important where this record is concerned), was just a kid when > he put this record together, and it sounds like he just let his > muse take him wherever. There is a certain magic to the record, > including the beautiful female part. One of my favorite all-time harmony records, and the first song The New Outlook sang (we opened our few performances at Bronx House and the 167th Y with "Over the Rainbow," Demension style). But I'm 99% sure that Irving Spice did the arrangement -- another kindly old guy with great ears. He was a violin player. All best, Paul www.sff.net/people/paullevinson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 12:25:32 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Les Scopitones Scopitones on DVD, at http://scopitones.com. Grey market. I haven't seen any of these transfers (yet!), but am told they are excellent. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 14:45:02 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: C. Carson Parks Andrew C. Jones wrote: > The only other US hit single that C. Carson Parks > wrote (that I know of) was "Cab Driver," which brought the venerable > Mills Brothers back to the Top 40 in 1968. Thanks. Haven't heard that one. Found a version of "Open For Business As Usual" on a Sue Raney LP instead. No hit for her but a nice tune anyway. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 15:01:46 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: Dobie Gillis Theme Chris Schneider says: > I always liked the "Dobie Gillis" TV show. Perhaps its jazzy > credits music was where I acquired my taste for vocalese? I have a Rhino compilation with TV tunes on it. Sounds like an original version with vocals by Jud Canlon's Rhythmaires. Written by score godfather Lionel Newman, with lyrics by Dobie creator Max Shulman. The compilation is on vinyl, so I have to transfer it to CD first. If none of the others S'poppers fill in, I'm gonna burn it and play it to musica (although this could take some time). Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 17:55:36 -0000 From: Will Stos Subject: Reading music Here's a question for some experts: I've read a lot of profiles on session singers who cut demos, only to have other performers cover them faithfully and have hits (ie. the Chiffons over-dubbing Little Eva on "One Fine Day," or Valerie Simpson cutting records for Diana Ross' early solo material). Was this very common? Also, was this done with performers who couldn't sight-read music, or read music altogether? Does anyone know of performers who can only learn by ear? Will : ) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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