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Spectropop - Digest Number 1450



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 26 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Accuracy of Top 40 Playlists
           From: Ed Salamon 
      2. Re: Gary Chester
           From: Hal Muskat 
      3. Re: Billy Abbott's Jewels
           From: Gary Myers 
      4. The Young Rascals
           From: Mikey 
      5. Re: Tex & The Chex
           From: Hal Muskat 
      6. Re: Accuracy of Top 40 Playlists
           From: Jim Shannon 
      7. Re: Long Islanders
           From: Steven Prazak 
      8. Maggie Thrett
           From: Mike McKay 
      9. Re: Rick Nelson - "Your Kind Of Loving"
           From: Fred Clemens 
     10. Re: Queens acts
           From: Phil X. Milstein 
     11. Re: do-be-do-be-doo
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Re: Long Island acts
           From: Gregg Lopez 
     13. Re: Tandyn Almer
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     14. Re: Song Hits
           From: Gary Myers 
     15. re: Long Island rockers
           From: Larry Lapka 
     16. Re: the price of love
           From: Kingsley Abbot 
     17. re: Patio Lantern (Vinton)
           From: Javed Jafri 
     18. Re: Your Kind Of Loving
           From: Steve Harvey 
     19. Re: Bobby Vinton v. Buddy Greco
           From: Rodney Rawlings 
     20. Re: Rick's Rarities
           From: Doug Richard 
     21. "S.O.S." / Long Islanders
           From: James Botticelli 
     22. Re: The Embassy label
           From: Scott Charbonneau 
     23. Re: Song Hits / Long Island (City) / Goody's / price of rex
           From: Phil X. Milstein 
     24. Re: Rick's Rarities
           From: James Botticelli 
     25. Re: do-be-do-be-doo
           From: Joe Nelson 
     26. Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart & Jack Keller
           From: Austin Roberts 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:14:53 -0000 From: Ed Salamon Subject: Re: Accuracy of Top 40 Playlists Jim Shannon: > I'm sure these playlists could have been manipulated by zealous > music directors with one eye on Cashbox and the other on Arbitron. Right you are Jim. If anything, playlists were better indicators of what was played, rather than what was sold. Sales "research" was pretty unreliable until Soundscan. Most stores spent little time keeping accurate track of single sales for the benefit of stations who called them (we in radio really valued those that tried - thanks 30+ years later to Leedle and Rich Cline at NRM, Paul at Record Rama, Dolores and Don at Stedefords). Store reports could often be influenced by a 25 box of stock 45s. You will note that most charts add "and the opinion of the station", which in itself was enough to negate all of the above. That said, playlists were such an unreliable indicator of even what was actually played, because of "paper adds", that today at least two companies make an industry out of monitoring stations airplay to determine accurate airplay. Ed "my playlists were always accurate" Salamon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:23:25 -0700 From: Hal Muskat Subject: Re: Gary Chester Dennis Diken: > Hello Hal, I am a major fan of Gary Chester. Please let me know > of efforts to get the man into the Hall Of Fame. Thanks Dennis. This effort is barely off the ground. We just keep talking Gary up to folks who might assist. We need to identify the folks who make the recommendations and selections and have good folks like you and our friends write letters to them. If these folks could just see his credit list from the back of New Breed, they'd be astounded and would wonder what took themselves so long. cheers, Hal -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 09:39:57 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Billy Abbott's Jewels > ...did a little research a few years ago and found Abbott's son. > Abbott is deceased and his real last name was Vaughn. Adding a bit to my own info: I have a phone # and address in Pensauken, NJ for Abbott's son, but IIRC, that info changed once during a period of only a few months, and I had the impression that it might be very changeable. Abbott (Vaughn) died many years ago - quite young - and I thought I had the year, along with a few other things, but I haven't found anything in the first couple of places I looked. Also, (not sure of this) I think the "Jewels" may have been just a name to use on the record and not a working group. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 13:59:25 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: The Young Rascals My cousin's band used to open up for The Rascals. My cousin says that live, The Rascals were UNTOUCHABLE. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 10:06:58 -0700 From: Hal Muskat Subject: Re: Tex & The Chex Hi Phil, Alan, The name Chex came from the fact that this was an inter-racial, multi enthnic group. I believe one of the guys was Puerto Rican, Tex is Black and the other three were Jewish, Italian and Irish - at least in 1962 - 63. A very Brooklyn band. Or so says my chromosome depleted memory. Where is Rod "Tex" Bristow? cheers, Hal -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 18:24:10 -0000 From: Jim Shannon Subject: Re: Accuracy of Top 40 Playlists Mike McKay wrote: > I worked at a 500-watt daytimer in 1971 (which nevertheless gave the > big, established Top 40 station in town a run for its money for a > time). We were independently owned, and no one in management knew or > cared anything about the music we played. I can recall any number of > records we kept on our local survey for several weeks after they'd > stiffed nationally, just 'cause we really liked 'em! "That's Fine" > by Brownsville Station and "Give Up Your Guns" by The Buoys are two > that come to mind from that summer. Mike: Similiar situation in my market, where the underdog but creative station would give the smaller labels and singles a little better chance by keeping on the playlist. Two songs from the spring of '68- "Mrs Bluebird" by Eternity's Children and "Sit with Guru" from the Strawberry Alarmclock. JIm Shannon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 16:01:15 -0400 From: Steven Prazak Subject: Re: Long Islanders ...lest we neglect the oft-neglected Barnaby Bye; two sweet 'n' syrupy pop elpees for Atlantic including both Alessi Brothers and Illusion drummer Mike Ricciardella. Steven Prazak Atlanta, GA -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:57:17 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Maggie Thrett Al Kooper wrote: > Include adjacent Queens (the borough, not the people) and ya get KISS, > Run DMC, Steve Katz, Harvey Brooks, James Brown (St. Albans-dweller) > Maggie Thrett... Wow, there's a name from out of the past! In high school I worked at a movie theatre that showed "Three in the Attic" for an extended run. I got to know the film (and its fine soundtrack by Chad and Jeremy) quite well. Maggie played the very long-haired hippie chick, one of three who try to screw the life out of Christopher Jones in retaliation for his trifling. (Death, where is thy sting? Especially when one of the others was Yvette Mimieux!). I didn't realize Maggie had any kind of a musical career. What's the scoop, Al? Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 22:53:02 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: Rick Nelson - "Your Kind Of Loving" S.J. Dibai wrote: > Hello, Spectropoppers! I was watching an "Ed Sullivan" clip that I > taped just to get Rick Nelson doing his groovy 1966 (?) record "Your > Kind Of Loving." It seems like he's miming to a recording, so I'm > assuming that what I hear there is what I would hear on the 45. I've > been looking for a while now to see if this track is available on > CD, but I haven't found it yet. Does anyone know of a CD release? I'm fairly certain that the performance was live, as most Sullivan performances were, to my knowledge. On that same broadcast, he also sang the flip side, "Fire Breathing Dragon", appearing without his band. Both performances were at least close if they were in deed done live. I do have a OZZIE AND HARRIET episode where he also performs "Your Kind Of Loving" at the end of the program. That IS different from the record. Fred Clemens -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 16:00:20 +0000 From: Phil X. Milstein Subject: Re: Queens acts Al Kooper wrote: > Include adjacent Queens (the borough, not the people) and ya get KISS, > Run DMC, Steve Katz, Harvey Brooks, James Brown (St. Albans-dweller) > Maggie Thrett, The Rockin' Chairs, Paul Harris and.... Not to mention Simon, and Garfunkel, Los Ramones y Las Shangri-Las. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 05:42:58 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: do-be-do-be-doo Karen Andrew wrote: > It's funny that Frank Sinatra did not like "Strangers in the Night". > That was one of his most famous songs, at least in his later years. > But, I just think it was a sexy, sort of magical song, especially if > you let your thoughts wonder while listening to it. Well, we all > have our likes and dislikes, heh? "That's Life" does it for me! Depending on what month it is, y'know? My, myyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 16:25:11 -0700 From: Gregg Lopez Subject: Re: Long Island acts I recall reading Sterling Morrison refer to the Velvet Underground, jokingly I think, as 'a tight Long Island bar band'. By 1969, 03 /4 of the band was from L.I. If one wants to groove on the L.I. scene of the '60s, then dig into the output of Pickwick records during Lou Reed's tenure. One cut in particular stands out -- from the 'Soundsville!' LP -- an amazing Curtis Mayfield homage called 'First Impression' by The Hi-Lifes, which I'd like to post to musica when there's space. As a serious music fan growing up on L.I., I had to take the LIRR to the city, so as never again to witness the blank expression of a Sam Goody clerk at the mall when asking for '96 Tears'. Other famous L.I. acts: Blue Oyster Cult, Foghat and Public Enemy. GL -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 12:07:02 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: Tandyn Almer Andrew Weiner wrote: > I got curious about Tandyn Almer after I discovered the Ballroom's > version of You Turned Me Around, the greatest hit The Association > never had. ... But I wonder how many more great songs he might > have written if he hadn't been busy inventing bongs. I guess his song, then, should be retitled "Along Comes Mary Jane". Or does it already have that connotation? Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 23:15:43 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Song Hits Phil M. provided link: > http://www.aspma.com/temp/SongHits; Phil, I tried the link, got a kind of index page (with an alien saying I got the wrong address, or something like that), tried site search, but did not find a Donnie Brooks article. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 05:45:33 -0700 (PDT) From: Larry Lapka Subject: re: Long Island rockers Dear All: I guess you could lump Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island together, although in my original post I was just thinking about the Island. Am I dreaming, or do Boyce and Hart (one or the other) have roots on Long Island, too? I am pretty sure that others related to The Monkees' success had Long Island roots, including Diane Hildebrand and Neil Sedaka -- growing up in South Jamaica, Queens in the mid to late 1960s and early 1970s, I knew Neil's nephew. Also, doesn't Don Kirshner have Island roots? For obvious reason, I did not list Mariah Carey. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 17:49:19 +0100 From: Kingsley Abbot Subject: Re: the price of love Ah!!! The memories of prices of British records! For what it's worth I'll put in my twopenneth ... In 1962 I'd say that singles were 6s 3d -- they went to 6s 8d (3 for a pound) circa late '63 ish. Full-price albums were 32s 6d, with budget ones (eg Ace of Glubs, etc.) at about 21s 6d, and imports (Transat in Lisle street -- oh happy days!) at 42s 6d. (For non-British members: 20s = one pound then.) My memory is that Woolwoths' Embassy range was exactly half-price, at 3s 4d -- anyone confirm? This lower price was also roughly the price of deleted discs, if you could find them at the time, tho they could also be cheaper -- I recall finding a big batch of US singles in the Holloway Road for 2s 6d. Can some kind US member of a certain age give US equivalents of the time?? Kingsley (happily pedantic) Abbott P.S. For obscure girl groups, I love the Inspirations' version of 'What Am I Gonna Do With You (Hey Baby)'. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 22:10:03 -0700 From: Javed Jafri Subject: re: Patio Lantern (Vinton) Clark Besch wrote: > Along the Vinton topic, was listening to Kim Mitchell's "Patio > Lantern" from the '80s the other day and realized he says something > about his first date and listening to "Roses are Red". Actually Cark, the "Patio Lantern" lyrics reference another Bobby Vinton song, "Blue on Blue", not "Roses are Red" Here's the lyric: Dancing to an old song Bobby Vinton's Blue on Blue Heartache on Heartache -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 20:46:33 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Your Kind Of Loving S.J. Dibai wrote: > I was watching an "Ed Sullivan" clip that I taped just to get Rick > Nelson doing his groovy 1966 (?) record "Your Kind Of Loving." The Knickerbockers did a version, too. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 22:41:51 -0000 From: Rodney Rawlings Subject: Re: Bobby Vinton v. Buddy Greco S.J. Dibai wrote: > Thanks for sharing Buddy Greco's version of "Mr. Lonely." ... > Greco's delivery is assured and professional, but where's the > vulnerability? The raw emotion? The strained falsetto, adding that > extra layer of pathos?? I'll take Bobby Vinton's version any day. I've never heard Greco's version, but I love the Vinton version for the exact reasons you do. I should mention here that this is NOT the song I was seeking in the other thread about "I am the lonely man, that's me." I still hope someone can come through for me on that. Rodney Rawlings -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 09:19:52 -0000 From: Doug Richard Subject: Re: Rick's Rarities S.J. Dibai wrote: > I was watching an "Ed Sullivan" clip that I taped just to get Rick > Nelson doing his groovy 1966 (?) record "Your Kind Of Loving." Both "Your Kind Of Loving" and its flip, "Fire Breathing Dragon", are on the new Ace CD "Rick's Rarities". Here's a link: http://www.acerecords.co.uk/gotrt/feb04/cdchd995.html Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 22 Apr 2004 15:09:07 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: "S.O.S." / Long Islanders Simon White wrote: > "Hey hey, I'm sending, > Out an S.O.S." from Maine to Mexico?....greatest non-Motown Motown rekkid ever. Gregg Lopez wrote: > Other famous L.I. acts: Blue Oyster Cult, Foghat and Public Enemy. Was Vanilla Fudge mentioned? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 16:47:44 -0000 From: Scott Charbonneau Subject: Re: The Embassy label Howard (collector of obscure British cover versions!!): > And would anybody be interested in hearing more on Woolies' Embassy > label? Didn't the Jaybirds, who would later become better known as Ten Years After, release a few 7" on the label? And wasn't there a compilation LP here in the US crica '64 or '65, put out by 20th Century Fox, entitled The Original Liverpool Beat? Believe this was a collection of various Embassy releases. Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 12:30:59 +0000 From: Phil X. Milstein Subject: Re: Song Hits / Long Island (City) / Goody's / price of rex Gary Myers wrote: > Phil, I tried the link, got a kind of index page (with an alien > saying I got the wrong address, or something like that), tried site > search, but did not find a Donnie Brooks article. My mistake -- one little misplaced semi-colon, and the whole damn thing breaks down! The correct link is: http://www.aspma.com/temp/SongHits The issue is cover-dated February, 1962. > I recall reading Sterling Morrison refer to the Velvet Underground, > jokingly I think, as 'a tight Long Island bar band'. By 1969, 03 /4 of > the band was from L.I. If one wants to groove on the L.I. scene of the > '60s, then dig into the output of Pickwick records during Lou Reed's > tenure. Pickwick was not in Long Island but rather Long Island City, which, I'm not mistaken, is the most westerly neighborhood of Queens, and visible from Manhattan. > As a serious music fan growing up on L.I., I had to take the LIRR to > the city, so as never again to witness the blank expression of a Sam > Goody clerk at the mall when asking for '96 Tears'. I knew someone who worked at a Goody's, in Jersey, at the time The Allman Brothers were at their peak popularity. Whenever someone would ask him where to find "Eat A Peach," he'd feign mishearing and lead the kid to the Edith Piaf section. > Other famous L.I. acts: Blue Oyster Cult, Foghat and Public Enemy. Foghat?! I always thought they were English. Maybe I'm confusing them with Humble Pie. Kingsley Abbot wrote: > Can some kind US member of a certain age give US equivalents of the > time? I recall singles, during late '60s/early '70s, as having been 69 cents, with LPs at $3.99. To get a leg up on the competition, a store might occasionally mark their albums down to $3.79, or even, when they REALLY wanted to sock it to 'em, $3.69. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 13:27:33 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Rick's Rarities S.J. Dibai wrote: > I was watching an "Ed Sullivan" clip that I taped just to get Rick > Nelson doing his groovy 1966 (?) record "Your Kind Of Loving." Doug Richard: > Both "Your Kind Of Loving" and its flip, "Fire Breathing Dragon", > are on the new Ace CD "Rick's Rarities". Here's a link: > http://www.acerecords.co.uk/gotrt/feb04/cdchd995.html Speaking of Rick Rarities...... "On The Flip Side" OST made for ABC-TV, scored by Burt Bacharach & Hal David, starring Rick Nelson & Joanie Sommers: "The story of a young big beat singer named Carlos O'Connor (Rick Nelson) who finds himself at 21, at the dangerous edge of being a has- been. His bookings have fallen to about zero, his recording contract cancelled, and, worst of all, the fan clubs have dropped him in favor of newer attractions The Hors D'Oeuvres and The West Berlin Nein. To save him from onrushing obscurity there materializes divine intervention in the form of four young hipsters from inside the Pearly Gates, a quartet headed by Angie (Joanie Sommers). Carlos needs their help, they decide. Didn't they do as much for Frankie in '53? They go AWOL from Big Pearly, as they call it, and transform themselves into a swinging group called The Celestials as a backing group for the solitary Carlos. Chaos of course ensues. From the top of the Pan Am Building, as they await Carlos' arrival in NYC , to his hotel, to the Way Out Inn in Greenwich Village, to a bankruptcy-riddled boutique called Juanita's Place, to the Cafe Pot, finally to a record company presided over by a foppish Edwardian, 23. Carlos re-emerges with a hit record and is once again on top. The songs are pure Bacharach & David--which is about as pure as you get these days. Whatever 'firsts' or 'lasts' the show can claim, the writing of completely contemporary songs for an original television production is certainly a 'first'. The songs are intricately woven into the plot. But as the Edwardian record producer says "enough polite"! Listen to these nuts and they'll have you down on MacDougal Street looking for Juanita's Place."....Liners -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 12:23:58 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: do-be-do-be-doo Karen Andrew wrote: > It's funny that Frank Sinatra did not like "Strangers in the Night". > That was one of his most famous songs, at least in his later years. > But, I just think it was a sexy, sort of magical song, especially if > you let your thoughts wonder while listening to it. Well, we all > have our likes and dislikes, heh? Clark Besch: > "That's Life" does it for me! Depending on what month it is, y'know? Jimmy Bowen, who produced both songs, once told an interviewer that the only song he produced on Frank that he'd ever seen the Chairman of the Board perform live was "That's Life". Bowen singled out SITN as a specific example that Frank DIDN'T sing. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 26 Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2004 13:36:51 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart & Jack Keller > Am I dreaming, or do Boyce and Hart (one or the other) have roots > on Long Island, too? I am pretty sure that others related to The > Monkees' success had Long Island roots Tommy Boyce was from Charlottesville, Va., but lived in NYC during the time he was working with Curtis Lee (they wrote Pretty Little Angel Eyes and Under The Moon Of Love for Curtis) and I'm sure he lived there before and after awhile. Bobby Hart is from Phoenix or Tuscon Arizona (I forget which one) and worked in NYC awhile too. He and Boyce did most of their work together in LA. Jack Keller, who also worked with the Monkees in LA is from Brooklyn. I have had the pleasure of working with all three (Oscar nomination with Hart) and they are all terrific talents. Tommy Boyce is greatly missed by those who knew him and also by those who new his work. Best, Austin Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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