The Spectropop Group Archives presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 1367



________________________________________________________________________
      
               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
________________________________________________________________________


There are 15 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop Update
           From: Martin Roberts 
      2. Re: DeShanonn/Gore sessions
           From: Alan Gordon 
      3. Re: Name Game
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      4. Just One Look - original?
           From: Phil C 
      5. Re: Jackie Shane
           From: Damien 
      6. New! Jeff Barry - The Official Fan Site
           From: Laura Pinto 
      7. Re: "Lama Rama Ding Dong"
           From: Mike McKay 
      8. Re: Doris Troy "Just One Look"
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      9. Re: Tradewinds
           From: Austin Roberts 
     10. Re:  BlueBeats/ Movies
           From: Chuck Limmer 
     11. Re: An era ends: Relic Rack closing
           From: Bill Craig 
     12. Smile; Mark Wirtz's new project
           From: Country Paul 
     13. Re: The Diplomats, Van McCoy and a Psychiatrist
           From: Art Longmire 
     14. Re: The Daughters Of Eve / Carl Bonafede
           From: Clark Besch 
     15. Re: Doris Troy "Just One Look" - original?
           From: Mick Patrick 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Message: 1 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 07:48:09 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop Update Linda Collins' "The Way You Like" on Time Records is playing as this week's Record of the Week on the home page. It's an obscure release from '61 first brought to my attention by Mick Patrick: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm >From next week onwards, a change to our usual schedule, inspired by silver-tongued wordsmith Phil C's revue of Jack Nitzsche's "Revolutionary Etude". Instead of having the Battle of the Nitzsches there will be a new feature, 'The Peoples Choice': a chosen-by-the-people, for-the-people kinda thing. So if you'd like to write a review of a Nitzsche-associated release, not available to buy on a legit CD and not previously featured, drop me a line offlist, or click the button on the homepage. Jack's radio interview continues with him chatting about producing Neil Young's "Expecting To Fly", comparisons to working in the recording studio with the Rolling Stones and what had gone before. Not to be missed: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/radio.htm Al Hazan and Jack's ROTW page has been tidied up. If you missed any of the tracks check out the page, the music is still available: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/ahjnrotw.htm Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 18:31:59 -0700 (MST) From: Alan Gordon Subject: Re: DeShanonn/Gore sessions Hi Jim, regarding the DeShannon, and Gore sessions and tapes... I was not at the DeShannon sessions, although I did stop by the Lesley Gore session, it was at Century Studios, owned by Brooks Arthur. I do not know what became of the tapes, but there are dedicated DeShannon, and Gore fans right here on S'pop who probably know the answers to your questions, and have copies of the songs you like. Thank you Jim for liking the songs. Best, That Alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 22:56:35 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Name Game Al Kooper: > Brute Force is Steve Friedlander > Tandyn Almer is Tandyn Almer Does anyone remember (or know) Rupert Holmes' real name? I remember him as a high school kid hanging around Sounds On Broadway. Nice young man, very good music education--I think his first instrument was oboe. He was just trying to get in the biz and could write little charts and sing and play and all that stuff until his Mom called him home for dinner. I have been trying to remember his real name for 25 years. I've been trying to remember my own name since 6PM, but I finally had to look at a business card. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 17:15:11 -0000 From: Phil C Subject: Just One Look - original? Mick: > lists the recording date of the "Just One Look" session as > March 5 1963, and the musicians as Napoleon "Snaggs" Allen > on guitar, Barney Richmond on bass, Bruno Carr on drums, and > Horace Ott on piano. Ah, the legendary Horace Ott! What a great feel he gave to everything he touched. The interplay between the keyboard and the bluebeat-flavoured guitar make this recording unique. > Her second Atlantic 45, "Tomorrow Is Another Day" b/w "What'Cha > Gonna Do About It", was cut at the same studio on July 29. Eric > Gale and Chauncey Westbrook replaced Snaggs Allen on guitar; > other than that, the other musicians were the same. Presumably Artie Ripp wasn't present for the later two cuts? The balance difference on these does change the feel, albeit subtly. > Here's what Doris had to say about it all: > "We used to do sessions for Juggy Murray at Sue. We showed him > 'Just One Look' but he thought it was too white (laughs). Presumably this is the Juggy Murray that made the fantastic "She Blew A Good Thing" by the Poets?? Incidentally, I have a rather left-field version of "Just One Look" by Andy & The Marglows, arranged by Garry Sherman, produced by Ed Silvers and featuring a somewhat incongruous barrel-house piano intro. It's the flip of "Symphony", a kind of second-generation "Some Kind Of Wonderful". The record has always been a mystery to me, until I searched the internet earlier today, and came up with the following from a biog of Terry Huff: "....As Andy and the Marglows, they [Terry and his brother Andy] recorded "Just One Look" for Liberty Records, who released it two weeks before the hit version by Doris Troy...." http://entertainment.msn.com/artist/?artist=198138 Unlikely, but it would seem that this is then the original version! Does anybody know the story of how they came to record and release it before Doris' own version? Both sides played to musica FYI. Phil C -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 17:27:56 -0000 From: Damien Subject: Re: Jackie Shane Jackie Shane was a frequent performer in the mid '60s at Toronto's Sapphire club, backed by Frank Motely's band. Openly gay, he was considered 'risque' at the time. "Any Other Way" was considered his lifestyle statement as well as his major single release. Rumours have circulated about his death, but I haven't seen a confirmation. Damien -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 15:05:45 -0000 From: Laura Pinto Subject: New! Jeff Barry - The Official Fan Site Hi fellow S'poppers, Do you like singing along with the Dixie Cups as they invite you to the "Chapel of Love?" How about with the Ronettes or Andy Kim, as they implore "Be My Baby?" (I'll bet you warble along with the chorus: "Be my ... be my baby" ... doncha?) Do you sigh at "Baby I Love You," cry at "Tell Laura I Love Her," smile with fond remembrance at "Sugar, Sugar?" What these and so many other tunes have in common is the genius of composer/producer Jeff Barry. Now, here's your chance to connect with the man himself! Just visit http://lpintop.tripod.com/jeffbarry/ to check out all that this talented giant in the music industry has accomplished over the decades! And while you're there, be sure to sign the guestbook and post a message on the message board -- Jeff will be visiting the board and responding to questions. Enjoy! Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 01:15:18 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: "Lama Rama Ding Dong" Fred Clemens wrote: > .....On my first visit, I'd seen > a copy of "Lama Rama Ding Dong" by the Edsels on the Dub label > for the hefty sum of $30! That was way out of my league, so it was > out of the question, and I'd already spent over $100 on about 50 > records. But after thinking about it when I got home, I made up > my mind to pick it up on my next visit (a week later). Owning one > "money record" shouldn't break me. I made the 45 minute trek the > following Saturday, with the Edsels record in mind, but when I got > there the record was gone! Not to make you feel even worse, Fred, but I feel compelled to tell this story. The Edsels were from my home town of Youngstown, Ohio. One of their members, Larry Green, ran a small mom and pop record store here called Discount Records for many years. I first discovered it in 1968. I can date this with certainty because "Wheels of Fire" by Cream had just been released, and my first visit to Larry's shop was the first time I laid eyes on it. I eagerly snapped it up, and was quite surprised when he charged me only $4.98 for it (as it was a double LP). I remember thinking, "Wow, this really IS Discount Records!" It came out on a subsequent visit that he didn't realize it was a double and charged me the single price! But Larry was a really good guy, and he let it slide. Anyway, more to the point of your post... I made many visits to Larry's shop throughout least the early 70s, and I clearly remember at one point going through an old box of 45s he had and encountering multiple copies of "Lama Rama Ding Dong". I didn't know much about doo-wop in those days, but I did know enough to find the spelling on the label curious. Only years later did I come to know the true story, and I've kicked myself ever since for not snagging some of those 45s. At that early juncture, I don't think the notion that records of that era could be a valuable commodity had really hit our part of the country yet. Obviously, it sure hadn't hit Larry! Larry and his partner Tony ran Tammy Records, which put out a ton of local stuff throughout the 60s and 70s (including sides by The Edsels' lead singer George Wydell, who's now retired but who entertained in the clubs here locally for many years). I've got a few of those somewhere in my collection...mostly soul, I believe. A version of The Edsels performs occasionally around town today, and they were on one of T.J. Lubinsky's PBS specials awhile back. But the camera never stood still or focused long enough on individual members for me to determine whether Larry was still among them. At least some of the backing guys, with a fleeting glance, looked old enough to be originals, though the guy singing lead was obviously much younger. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 23:05:03 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Doris Troy "Just One Look" Mick Patrick: > Doris Troy wrote "Just One Look" with her friend Gregory Carroll. > Let's hope the royalties helped pay some of her medical bills in > recent years. Gregory Caroll now lives in Boone, NC about 80 miles from me and sometimes speaks at Appalachian State College. According to a prof there, Mr. Carroll now owns his own mountain in that (very wealthy) area --Blowing Rock/Linville. The prof says that Carroll tells the kids at school "whatever you do, keep the publishing, that's where the money is". A check of his credits at BMI shows lots and lots of songs, but only "Just One Look" as a BMI award winner. IMHO, the key to Just One Look, besides the great bridge is Horace Ott's little piano riffs. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 23:29:15 EST From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Tradewinds Hey Phil, I worked with the Tradewinds in the late 60's,early 70's on some demos that John Hill (of Are you Ready fame) and I had written. They played on them and did all the backgrounds which made my life a whole lot easier. They sounded great and were easy to work with. Can't remember which NYC studio we used. Austin Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 11:40:17 -0700 From: Chuck Limmer Subject: Re: BlueBeats/ Movies Jim Shannon wrote: > ...Not ready to give up his beloved band, Griffen once again > changed the name of the group in early '69 to The Movies and > released another single but it failed to chart in major markets. > The Movies disbanded by mid '69 and faded into obscurity. Bill Craig: > I'm assuming these Movies were not the band from the > '70s who had a tune called "Dancing On Ice"? I think they were an > east coast band. Bill: Different group, I think. The '70s Movies were Michael Morgan, Peter Barnes, and Ted Medbury; that trio's self-titled debut, produced by Vini Poncia, was released on Arista (AL 4085) in 1976. No idea whathappened to the group or any of its members thereafter, but still have that LP of light, melodic pop-rock--their sole recording?--shelved among the vinyl. Chuck Limmer -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 20:21:22 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: An era ends: Relic Rack closing I recall the late '60s cruising scene on Main St. in Hackensack (right past The Relic Rack)on week-end nights as being something straight out of American Graffiti, so it made sense that the coolest record store was on the spot. Speaking of significant NJ record stores, does anyone remember Dumont Records? They had locations in both downtown Paterson and Passaic. A guy I knew named Ritchie Kaltz was the resident oldies expert at both. This was when a Doo-Wop '50s record was all of about ten years old. Bill Craig -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 15:29:54 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Smile; Mark Wirtz's new project Doug Richard, thanks for posting Richard Williams' stirring review of "Smile" in The Guardian. I envy all who were present; it must have been a momentous event. I can only hope that Brian Wilson, in his wisdom, will choose to bring it to the US, and particularly to the New York area or northeast area. Mark Wirtz graciously invites us to http://markwirtz0.tripod.com/mw/id41.html for his triumphant return to active music production. On the heels of reading the Wilson review comes this really neat track with many Beach Boys and Beatles overtones. I think this is a delicious piece of pop pie; Mark's closing line, "Warm best," aptly describes the track as well. I hear only one less-than-strong section, where the fade in to the second verse occurs; my personal taste would be to extend the pause and have a more dramatic crescendo, and also to give a bit more fullness behind Rob's vocal in the early parts of the second verse. Nonetheless, I think Mark and the associated gentlemen have created a song almost too good for what passes for music on pop radio these days, although it might be welcomed on "lite" radio (where it would singlehandedly elevate the format by at least 20%!) or "adult album alternative." Of course, it's precisely these limiting categories which have done so much to emasculate current American music radio. I'm three listens into it so far, and sure am happy. And the hook is staying with me. Bring on the album! (I'll also play this for my wife, a wonderful lady with absolutely no technical knowledge of music. She's my "mass appeal" barometer; she either likes it or doesn't, which is the way most of the rest of [less musically sophisticated] world hears music. I'll forward her unvarnished response.) By the way - Anthony and Tony Rivers? That's a bit like guitarist James Burton and his brother Jimmy! (And on the topic of nomenclature, Tandyn Almer and Tupper Saussy were real names; Mars Bonfire and Brute Force don't appear on their birth certificates, but they're cool handles, anyway!) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 22:23:54 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: The Diplomats, Van McCoy and a Psychiatrist Mark wrote: > If you haven't heard the (Diplomats') Arock singles, you're in > for a real treat. "Here's a Heart" is just incredible, a super > sublime soul ballad that grows on you with repeated listens. > Another of their Arock records, "Cards on the Table", is now > selling for silly money (triple figures) in the UK. Hello Mark, It's amazing what you can find out on the Spectropop board-I recorded "Here's a Heart" off of my favorite soul radio show onto a cassette back in the early 80's, but never knew the name of the group that sang it. Now I know-and you are certainly right, this song is a gorgeously sung ballad. Speaking of the Four Puzzles-I have a song by them on a CD called "Impressed: 24 Groups Inspired By the Impressions". The name of the song is "Especially For You, Baby". Is this the same group? This CD, which I'm pretty sure is on Ace/Kent, is outstanding, and also includes "Just Enough To Hurt Me" by the Astors, which you mentioned in an earlier post. Art Longmire -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 07:37:43 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: The Daughters Of Eve / Carl Bonafede S'pop Team wrote: > Attention girl group anoraks! Chicago's very own Daughters Of > Eve are the subject of the latest S'pop feature article. The > piece was put together by the group's drummer Debi Pomeroy and > girl group aficionado Mick Patrick. Take a look at this URL: > http://www.spectropop.com/DaughtersOfEve/index.htm Debi and Mick, I just want to say how much I enjoyed the Daughters of Eve music. Carl Bonafede, the Screamin Wildman, really got you gals around the midwest pretty good. I have a tape I gave Mick of an ad for a gig in Wichita (which I see you enjoyed very much!) and somewhere, I have an ad from the Omaha World Herald for the "All Girl Band" from Chicago! Woulda been great to hear you belt out "Hey Lover" back then. Really liked "Don't Waste my Time" a lot too. Sounds like you enjoyed having Carl as a manager? He had the Buckinghams and lost them during your tenure with him. I know James Holvay has some Wildman stories. Carl even recorded a song of James'. Is Carl still alive? Our Mr. Holvay also recorded the female group, Mousie & The Traps. Did you ever see them? How bout the great Luv'd Ones? The Daughters did great pop while the Luv'd Ones snarled. Both were great, I thought. Thanks for some few, but great sides in the best period of pop music! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 24 Feb 2004 20:22:37 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Doris Troy "Just One Look" - original? Phil Chapman on Doris Troy: > Presumably Artie Ripp wasn't present for the later two cuts? > The balance difference on these does change the feel, albeit > subtly. Actually, Artie Ripp is credited (Supervision) on Doris' "Tomorrow Is Another Day"/"What'cha Gonna Do About It" 45, as well as on "Just One Look". However, according to Doris he was not hands on. > Incidentally, I have a rather left-field version of "Just One > Look" by Andy & The Marglows, arranged by Garry Sherman, > produced by Ed Silvers and featuring a somewhat incongruous > barrel-house piano intro. It's the flip of "Symphony", a kind of > second-generation "Some Kind Of Wonderful". The record has > always been a mystery to me, until I searched the internet > earlier today, and came up with the following from a biog of > Terry Huff: > > "....As Andy and the Marglows, they [Terry and his brother Andy] > recorded "Just One Look" for Liberty Records, who released it two > weeks before the hit version by Doris Troy...." > http://entertainment.msn.com/artist/?artist=198138 > > Unlikely, but it would seem that this is then the original > version! Does anybody know the story of how they came to record > and release it before Doris' own version? Well yes, but the Doris Troy version had been in the can for some time before she got a company interested in releasing it. I would imagine that the Andy & the Marglows recording was the result of Doris' publishers doing their job - getting songs recorded. Doris was, after all, a jobbing songwriter. Her first success came early in 1960 when her composition "How About That" became a hit for Dee Clark. The Sapphires, Junior Lewis and Madeline Bell also recorded her compositions. I hear that Ahmet Ertegun, Dionne Warwick, Valerie Simpson and Cissy Houston were at Doris' funeral. Cissy sang. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.