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Spectropop - Digest Number 1349



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Keep On Singing
           From: Bill George 
      2. Re: Eleven of the best / Carl Hall
           From: Christian Gordon 
      3. Re: Eleven of the best: Lakeside
           From: Robert R. Radil 
      4. Davy Jones / hard-to-find gems
           From: Jim Shannon 
      5. Re: Arbors day
           From: Mikey 
      6. Re: Gerry and Pacemakers
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
      7. Re: Teacho Wiltshire, session players
           From: Al Kooper 
      8. Main Street by Gary Lewis
           From: Clark Besch 
      9. Re: "Sandy"
           From: David Coyle 
     10. Re: The Collector / fake Zombies
           From: David Coyle 
     11. Re: Arbors day
           From: Austin Roberts 
     12. Re: Arbors day
           From: Andrew C. Jones 
     14. Gene Hughes memorial and benefit
           From: Ed Salamon 
     15. Re: Lownly Crowde
           From: Alun Hill 
     16. <<<< Spectropop London Party >>>>
           From: S'pop Projects 
     17. New Yahoo Group - Beatlemania40
           From: Laura Pinto 
     18. Re: Teacho Wiltshire, session players
           From: Artie Butler 
     19. Re: Eleven of the best / Aldora Britton
           From: Martin Roberts 
     20. Re: Connie Francis - Lipstick
           From: Paul Bryant 
     21. Re: bogus Vogues
           From: Jake 
     22. Re: Arbors day
           From: Paul Richards 
     23. Re: Lownly Crowde
           From: John Berg 
     24. RIP Gene Hughes; Sandy Songs; Respectable; Happy together
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     25. Re: Al Kooper & The Surfer Girls
           From: Janet Bonica 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 01:07:52 EST From: Bill George Subject: Keep On Singing Austin: This holiday season, my parents surprised me with a very special gift. It was a CD containing musical performances from my sister and I when we were kids. One of the tracks was me singing along to Helen Reddy's single of Keep On Singin. I might have been six years old? It brought back a lot of memories. I can't say I still sound the same though. Ha! Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 21:31:12 -0500 From: Christian Gordon Subject: Re: Eleven of the best / Carl Hall Speaking of Carl Hall's association with Alan Gordon, he also sang lead on "Sad Girl" -- a smooth, soulful ballad, one of my personal AG favs. Carl could sure bring it. CG -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 14:03:28 -0000 From: Robert R. Radil Subject: Re: Eleven of the best: Lakeside Al Kooper wrote: > Lakeside - I Want To Hold Your Hand - (Solar 47954-A) I love soul > Beatles covers!!! This is a great arrangement you would never > expect. I'm cheating cause it's 70's, but you'll love it. I was working at WNHC, New Haven, CT when they played it. It had to be early 1980s. It was interesting. Devout Beatle fans may "thumbs down" it, but you have to be open-minded. Bob Radil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:03:59 -0000 From: Jim Shannon Subject: Davy Jones / hard-to-find gems I happened to be working with Country Paul during the time he interviewed Davy Jones (WHCN-FM) and can verify his position as "actor first and muscian second". In fact, he was playing in one of the dinner theatres that very same night. Still think "Wanna Be Free" was their "Yesterday", and used to sneak it in once in awhile on air. Always liked Davy's voice. Came across a hard-to-find gem from my pop archives the other night, Don Grady's "The Children of St. Monica". Nice vocals, and I believe it charted into the Top 20 in '66. Another forgotten gem that I still have in my collection, a georgous song called "Don't Let The Rain Fall Down On Me" by The Critters. Got small airplay in some markets and, of course, you'll never hear it anywhere these days. Jim Shannon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 17:17:22 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Arbors day Boy do I love The Arbors!!! I think "A Symphony For Susan" is one of the best songs of the '60s. Just total beauty from start to finish. Those classical piano 1/4 notes really make the song. And the guys' harmony is just breathtaking. Even The Lettermen, the MASTERS at this sort of record, couldn't do a better job on it than The Arbors did. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 02:07:45 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Gerry and Pacemakers Clark Besch wrote: > Jim, That great song is on Gerry & Pacemakers great Legendary Masters > Cd on Capitol. Deleted now, but likely to be found many places. > Could be a Collectibles reissue? Collectables (oldies.com) has it for $7.98 http://www.oldies.com/product/view.cfm/id/56292.html Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 11:29:25 EST From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Teacho Wiltshire, session players Artie Butler: > Piano & organ - Ernie Hayes, Moe Wechsler, Bert Keyes, Kelly Owens > Sax - Sam "The Man" Taylor, Big Al Sears, Sil Austin, Bill Rommel, > Georgie Auld, Seldon Powell Artie -- I feel compelled to make two small corrections to your considerable knowledgebase. On keyboards would that not be FRANK Owens instead of Kelly Owens? And on sax would that not be Bill Ramal as opposed to General Rommell ?? Al Kooper Studio Statistician -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:48:52 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Main Street by Gary Lewis Hi, I tried to find the 2 posts on this record, but couldn't, so I'll just comment. It was a great 45 in '68 after Gary got out of the army. In '66, the Astronuats did indeed do an excellent version of this James Griffin (Bread) co-written goodie. A couple of interesting things about it. One, KIMN in Denver charted both versions when they came out! Gary Lewis' version can be found in stereo on the somewhat rare Liberty LP, "Close Cover Before Playing". A really cool LP cover, because it is made just like a matchbook. The foldover top has a pic of Gary (not very hip-looking for 1968), and when you open the foldover top, it reveals a full LP-size photo of matchbook matches as they look inside a matchbook. A really cool idea, I thought. The LP also contains his hit "Rhythm of the Rain" as well as another Griffin-Z. Gordon song, "Apologize," as well as the writing team Proffer-Marmalzat on "Picture Postcard". One other thing on Snuff Garrett's produced "Main Street" production, the cool drum solo that starts the song on Gary's version is a dead-on perfect rendition of the later PAMS jingles intros to some of the "Rock Of" jingles!! Cool intro! Also, Gary performed this on the Sullivan show in a really cool clip. Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 07:17:11 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: "Sandy" "Sandy" by Ronny & The Daytonas was also covered by the Swinging Blue Jeans in 1966 -- their version appears on both "Hippy Hippy Shake: The Definitive Collection" (EMI), "Liverpool 63-68" (See For Miles) and "The Swinging Blue Jeans At Abbey Road" (EMI). Although the SBJ are best known as a driving Liverpool beat group, this is one of their poppier numbers, with strings and all that. The SBJ were one of those rare Merseybeat groups that were able to change with the times, verging on bubblegum by the late '60s. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 06:44:17 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: The Collector / fake Zombies Is the Bluebeats version of "The Collector" the same song as was recorded by the Everly Brothers on their "Two Yanks In England" LP? The LP was produced by several of the Hollies, and this song sounds so much like the Hollies, I would've thought it originally appeared on a Hollies record, as did "Fifi The Flea," another haunting track from said album. It's interesting to note that this "Collector" was written by former Cricket Sonny Curtis, who could write music that was as far removed from the Buddy Holly sound as one could imagine. My question about the many "fake" Zombies is this: When they appeared on TV shows, did they lip-synch to the "Odyssey And Oracle" tracks? And live, did they sound enough like the Zombies to fool anyone? I would think Colin Blunstone's vocals would be hard to reproduce. Screaming teens could have drowned out any shortcomings, but by 1968, and with the introspective style of the album, I would imagine people would be listening more than screaming. In some ways it's a shame that the Zombies didn't get back together to promote the album and the singles, once "Time Of The Season" took off. The "R.I.P." album, as heard on the "Zombies Heaven" boxed set, would have been an awesome followup if the original group had finished it. But it's the finality of their decision that makes the Zombies legends 30+ years after the fact. Had the Zombies carried on, perhaps overdoing themselves and making lackluster soft pop or progressive records in the '70s, and died an even slower death, would we be making such a big deal out of the Blunstone and Argent tour and album? I'll throw in my thanks for helping to break "Odyssey," Al. Were it not for this album, I might still not have a theme for my upcoming wedding ("This Will Be Our Year"). David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:31:10 EST From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Arbors day Phil Milstein asked: > Who were the individual members? Phil, There were two sets of brothers, of which two were twins. I believe Charlie Callelo did the arrangements. This was circa 1973 or 4. I don't remember their names, only their terrific attitudes. Also, I put some overdrive (ala fuzz) on a bassoon, which pissed the bassoonist off. Austin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 10:13:17 -0500 (EST) From: Andrew C. Jones Subject: Re: Arbors day Austin: Were you involved with the Arbors' Date single "The Letter" b/w "Most of All," or their "Isn't Life Strange" medley? ACJ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:42:23 -0000 From: Ed Salamon Subject: Gene Hughes memorial and benefit Gene's memorial service Monday was packed. Country singer Ed Bruce sang. Tuesday's Rockin' At The Trap benefit was a huge success. Gary Talley (Box Tops), Joe Stampley, Buzz Cason, Dickey Lee, Spectropper Austin Roberts (said his first performance in 25 years -- I hope the great audience response encourages Austin to do more), Clifford Curry, Ray Peterson, T. Graham Brown, Freddie Weller, James Griffin (Bread), Bruce Channel -- I'm probably missing someone -- all well backed by Steve Jarrell and The Sons Of The Beach celebrated Gene's life. The night opened with a great film produced by Spectropopper Skip Woolwine, which combined photos of Gene and Gene's live performance that Skip shot last year at a benefit for Ray Peterson. Gene will be honored in Guy Gilcrest's comic strip, Nancy, on February 26 (if I recall the date correctly). The original art was presented to Gene's wife at the benefit. Ed Salamon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2004 23:40:00 -0000 From: Alun Hill Subject: Re: Lownly Crowde Harvey Williams wrote: > I've not been able to find out anything about the "band", but the disc itself > was produced by Tom Wilson, the subject of much discussion 'round > here not too long ago. The flip is an instrumental version of the same > song. Maybe I'll upload that too if there's any interest. Hi, Count me in -- I'd love to hear the instro version of this track. Glad you posted it. It has been on my want list to hear since forever! Did they do anything else? Cheers, AH -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 21:13:10 -0000 From: S'pop Projects Subject: <<<< Spectropop London Party >>>> Dear Members, The Spectropop Team and the Actionettes invite you all to a PARTY to be held in London on Saturday March 27th. There will be no entrance fee but anyone wishing to attend MUST have their name on the official guest list. More details will be announced shortly. In the meantime, to add your name to the guest list, respond to this message, or email projects@spectropop.com See some of you there. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 17:34:13 -0000 From: Laura Pinto Subject: New Yahoo Group - Beatlemania40 Hi fellow S'poppers, You're all invited to join the brand-new Yahoo Group, Beatlemania 40. Created in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Beatles' assault on America and the world, Beatlemania 40 will be devoted to discussions about the Fab Four and related topics (i.e., Beatle relatives!) only. Please go to http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Beatlemania40/ and click on the link to join this new group where we can discuss everything about the Fab Four, from our 1964 memories to present-day CD and video releases. Hope to see you Beatle fans join us! Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 12:40:35 EST From: Artie Butler Subject: Re: Teacho Wiltshire, session players Hi Al, No it was Kelly Owens on piano. Frank was on the scene a little later. Kelly was a piano player and a good B3 player as well. As far as the spelling on Bill Ramal, I am sure you are right. Thanks, Artie Butler -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 00:18:35 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Re: Eleven of the best / Aldora Britton Al Kooper poured his praise on Aldora Britton's first Decca 45, 'No Cookies In My Bag' and asked "Anybody else onboard here?" I must confess that I don't know this record. But from two years earlier, "Am I Ever Gonna See My Baby Again" (Columbia 44375 '67) is always there or thereabouts in my own top eleven. Its 'soul credentials' are supplied by songwriters R.Bailey-R.Clark -J.Northern. A tear-jerking, BIG soul ballad carried by a voice that drags every ounce of emotion from the lyric. It may come as a surprise that the producers are the Jerome Brothers with John Abbott arranging but it shouldn't. More known for their 'pop' productions but a fair few of their records posses the honesty and intensity associated with the best 'soul' records. I'd also suggest looking out for a one-off release on (20th Century 6610 '66) "For Your Love I'll Die" by Sammy Turner. Two years after his brief time at Motown it's as if the Jeromes (co-writers along with Frank Amodeo, as well as the producers) were attempting to have the 'Motown-sound' hit that Motown never achieved. Pity they 'failed', but a smashing record nonetheless. Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 06:08:06 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Connie Francis - Lipstick Dear all, As Country Paul was discussing Lipstick on your Collar I wondered if Spoppers knew that the late Dennis Potter used that title for a major British TV series, circa 1990 I think. He did a kind of trilogy of tv series which featured period music, the first being Pennies From Heaven, which was later inappropriately remade as a Steve Martin vehicle - that was the 30s and featured great British dance band stuff. Then came The Singing Detective, I believe that's also being/been remade, and that was 40s music. Finally "Lipstick on your Collar", starring the youthful Ewan MacGregor and featuring many late 50s hits all mimed zestfully by the characters in the drama. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 15:10:45 -0000 From: Jake Subject: Re: bogus Vogues David Coyle: > P.S. I heard that in one instance where the "fake" > Zombies were on tour, one fan said that the lead > singer didn't look anything like they remembered from > the album cover or the magazines, and was told that > the original lead singer had died in a car crash. So > who's that bloke touring with Rod Argent now? The bloke currently posing as lead singer with the Zombies *is* the lead singer, Colin Blunstone. Reporting from recent gigs of this tour indicates that he is better than ever. Jake -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 13:44:35 EST From: Paul Richards Subject: Re: Arbors day Totally agree with you Mikey, The Arbors were brilliant. 'Symphony for Susan' is such a great track. I've got a UK version by The King Brothers from '66 on Page One which is also pretty fantastic but The Arbors version beats all. The Arbors voices will be known to most people by the 'Green Giant' 70's ads. Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 14:28:48 EST From: John Berg Subject: Re: Lownly Crowde I suspect "The Lownly Crowde" was yet another studio-only aggregation, but would love to be proven wrong by someone in the know. In the meantime, thanks to Harvey for playing this recording! John Berg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 16:56:35 EST From: Bob Rashkow Subject: RIP Gene Hughes; Sandy Songs; Respectable; Happy together "Now we can tell him goodbye......" Wish I'd been there. A toast to you, Gene Hughes, and your wonderful voice. Correct me if I'm wrong, anyone. Johnny Crawford covered Larry Hall's "Sandy". But Dion's "Sandy" and Ronny & The Daytonas' "Sandy" are 2 completely different tunes, right? According to Whitburn's Top Pop if I'm not mistaken. Not, of course, to be confused with "Sandy" from Grease--but that's not a S'pop era tune. Thank you Fred Clemens for clearing up the info on "Respectable" and for teaching me a new thing. Didn't know those oh-so-talented Isleys did the original. Seems like they inspired dozens of remakes! My take on the "How is the weather...?" at the end of "Happy Together" back in '67 was that rain or shine, snowstorm or tornado, we're in love. Well, after all...I was eleven, gimme a break! ! ! Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2004 22:26:02 -0000 From: Janet Bonica Subject: Re: Al Kooper & The Surfer Girls Mick Patrick: > Hey Al, what can you tell us about the Surfer Girls? As far as > I know this outfit released just one record, "One Boy Tells > Another" (Columbia 43001, 1964), written by yourself with Bob > Brass and Irwin Levine. Steve Venet produced the track and Denny > Randell was the arranger. What great label copy! And what a way > cool record. Were the Surfer Girls perhaps another group in > disguise? We girl group anoraks neeeeeeeeed to know such things. The Surfer Girls were a Staten Island duo from New Dorp H.S. comprised of Lorraine Bonica on lead (my cousin) and Janice Bartholomew. They were originally called the Durettes. When Columbia signed them on, the record comany changed the name of the group and added a third voice. Unfortunately, Lorraine passed away about 15 years ago. I don't know anything about Janice. I think I heard that she moved to Florida. I still have their publicity shot from Columbia Records. Draggin' Wagon was the "A" side. Fellow Staten Islanders Vito Picone (of the Elegants "Little Star") and Ron Dante may remember more about the group. Janet Bonica -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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