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Spectropop - Digest Number 1299



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Pop Music On TV This Week
           From: Mark Hill 
      2. Re: Vocal treatments of Instrumentals
           From: Ken Silverwood 
      3. Re: Vocal treatments of instrumentals
           From: steveo 
      4. Re: Los Bravos sing Ed Rambeau
           From: Ed Rambeau 
      5. Re: worst singing
           From: superoldies 
      6. Gary Stites?
           From: superoldies 
      7. Re: Los Bravos sing Ed Rambeau
           From: Ed Rambeau 
      8. Re: Songs that quote others
           From: Steve Harvey 
      9. Aaron Schroeder
           From: Al Kooper 
     10. Bass players
           From: Dan Hughes 
     11. Colours / Bad Day At Black Rock, Baby
           From: Mark Hill 
     12. Elvis & Abba
           From: Mark Hill 
     13. Fake Skipping Records
           From: Mark Hill 
     14. The Beatle Myth
           From: John Clemente 
     15. Re: Mary Hopkin
           From: ACJ 
     16. Stickers
           From: ACJ 
     17. Re: lo fi
           From: Phil Milstein 
     18. Re: Vocal treatments of Instrumentals
           From: James Botticelli 
     19. Re: Beatles Bands
           From: James Botticelli 
     20. Re: Songs that "quote" others
           From: James Botticelli 
     21. Re: Jimmie Cross
           From: Phil Milstein 
     22. A rather special Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update
           From: Martin Roberts 
     23. Re: Portrait of Ed Rambeau
           From: Ed Rambeau 
     24. Re: How Neato
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     25. Varispeed/Lloyd Thaxton
           From: Alan V. Karr 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 14:38:57 -0500 From: Mark Hill Subject: Pop Music On TV This Week On TRIO Monday at 8am and 1pm is LAUGH-IN with guests SONNY AND CHER. This is the uncut 1 hour episode. This is followed on Tuesday 8am and1pm with guests SONNY (alone) and Barbara Feldon. *_*_* I thought this also might be of interest to the group. It's not just HEAVY METAL- there are POP connections, too: Coming up tonight (Sunday) on the TRIO network is the premiere of new series, PARKING LOT. 9pm and 12am Sunday with new episodes every weeknight at 9pm and 12pm. Check your local listings. These are documentaries, in which we visit the music fans in parking lots at rock concerts. Like: a Cher concert, Motorhead concert, Yanni, Phish, Christina Aguilara, Fleetwood Mac, Dixie Chicks and The White Stripes. It could be a hoot. This is by the director of the famous 1980's documentary film HEAVY METAL PARKING LOT. Which *NOTE* is being shown following at 9:30pm and 12:30am. (And 6 more showings on Sunday 02/01) This is a great short film. Looking at fans in the parking lot at a Judas Priest concert. Funny and insightful. Kind of like SPINAL TAP- only this is real! The first follow up to HM PARKING LOT was NEIL DIAMOND PARKING LOT. In which they interviewed Diamond fans 10 years later, in the same stadium parking lot as the JUDAS PRIEST concert. Which has recently been torn down. Whether this will be on Trio remains to be seen. Find out more about HEAVY METAL PARKING LOT and the TRIO showings here: http://www.heavymetalparkinglot.net/ http://www.triotv.com/parking_lot/ http://www.planetkrulik.com/hmpl.htm This one is good, well-illustrated: http://www.leisuresuit.net/Webzine/articles/heavymetal_parkinglot.shtml "Dr. Mark" Hill * The Doctor Of Pop Culture -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 01:22:07 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Vocal treatments of Instrumentals Frank wrote: > Actor James Darren released vocal versions of two > Duane Eddy instrumentals - "Because They're Young" and > "Gidget Goes Hawaiian" ,both on Colpix singles, etc... Frank: > "Because They're Young", written by Don Costa, Aaron > Schroeder and Ernest Gold, had a middle section that > was really pretty. I discovered this by looking at a > lead sheet of the song. This middle part is not heard > on the Duane Eddy version. Also the lead sheet had > words, and now I know who recorded it. I assume that > Aaron wrote the words, since the other 2 men are more > or less strictly musicians. Yeh I think it goes, " See the happy couples walking hand in hand, Now at last theyre all alone, They touch, they kiss and with each kiss, they remind us of the joy's we've known." I only know this as I have it on a Pye Golden Guinea LP "Honey Hit Parade" presented by Kent Walton. Why guinea? cos it cost 21 shillings Why Honey? I think it was a hair spray. Who Kent Walton? Erstwhile wrestling commentator. Dimble-limble ay, dimble-limble i, dimble-limble oo, dindy-i-o Ken On The West Coast. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 18:09:14 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Re: Vocal treatments of instrumentals Mikey wrote: > I also might add that The Lettermen had a nice hit > in 1965 with their EXCELLENT version of "Theme From > A Summer Place" done in their stunning three part > vocal style. The record sounds great even today. Mikey, The Lettermen's record "summer Place" is a genius sound and production! Scored by Jimmie Haskell. Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:17:31 EST From: Ed Rambeau Subject: Re: Los Bravos sing Ed Rambeau > I was both a lyrics and melody man. Often times I even wrote > both. There is a Los Bravos song I wrote complete lyrics to > while in Cannes at the music festival in 19 blah, blah, blah. > I can't even remember the name of it. Eddy: > Ed, Would that be Make it Last on the Bring a Little Lovin' album? Eddy, That's it, Eddy. Thanks. See that....2 Ed's are better than one. I couldn't remember that title to save my life. Do you have that track? I lost it in my recent computer crash. Would love to get it back. Ed Rambeau -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 02:23:45 -0000 From: superoldies Subject: Re: worst singing I personally never cared for Claudine Longet, and this could start another topic...most out of tune record. I recently heard the Four Sonics charter "You Don't Have To Say You Love Me"....whoa! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 02:25:49 -0000 From: superoldies Subject: Gary Stites? Since I started my station in November, I've had 3 listeners write in & ask about Gary Stites' whereabouts. Can't find anything on the web about him except he went into horse racing. Anyone have anything to add? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:53:47 EST From: Ed Rambeau Subject: Re: Los Bravos sing Ed Rambeau Mike Edwards: > Hi Ed, The Los Bravos song you wrote was "Make It Last" (Parrott > 3020, 1968), which was released as the b-side of their last US hit, > "Bring A Little Lovin'". Ed Responds: Thanks, Mike...but someone else beat you to the punch and informed me. But I want to thank you for that nice fan club plug and for all the work you and the others you mentioned did on the site. I know I've thanked you in person, but would like to take this opportunity to thank you publically. It was a great pleasure meeting you at the Old Time Radio convention and once again...thanks so much for the ride home. Bud Rehak sends his best to you as well. I gave him the info you requested and unfortunately he's doing a great deal of traveling from NY to his hometown of Hazleton, PA as a result of an elderly uncle who he is caring for. I'm sure he'll get to it as soon as he can. Ed Rambeau -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 19:28:30 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Songs that quote others Paul Bryant wrote: > Any other people who quote themselves on their own records? Come to think of it there were three self-quotes on the Beach Boys MIU album. One was a lift from "Hawaii" for "Kona Coast". I'll have to listen to it again to get the other two. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:31:13 EST From: Al Kooper Subject: Aaron Schroeder > "Because They're Young", written by Don Costa, Aaron > Schroeder and Ernest Gold, had a middle section that > was really pretty. I discovered this by looking at a > lead sheet of the song. This middle part is not heard > on the Duane Eddy version. Also the lead sheet had > words, and now I know who recorded it. I assume that > Aaron wrote the words, since the other 2 men are more > or less strictly musicians. Aaron was a lyricist exclusively. I worked for him for many years. He is now deep in Alzheimers, but his wife Abby takes excellent care of him. I was amazed to see them both show up at one of my live shows recently. I was quite flattered. They were early supporters and not only of me: Randy Newman, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Radcliffe, Joey Brooks, Barbara Jean English, Barry White & Gene Pitney all benefitted from Schroeder's mentoring. Al Kooper -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:37:51 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Bass players Paul Bryant sez: > Some time ago Bill Wyman was trying to get some kind of songwriter > credit for various early Jagger/Richards songs because he said his > bass playing helped make the records hits... Which recalls a riddle told to me by (Yardbirds drummer) Jim McCarty: What's the difference between a drummer and a bass player? Answer: The bass player thinks he's a musician. ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:22:11 -0500 From: Mark Hill Subject: Colours / Bad Day At Black Rock, Baby > Colours.... The first LP is great Beatles-styled psych-pop // > still not widely recognized so you can still pick it up cheaply. Got my vinyl copy the first season I started hitting yard sales for records, c.1980. I'm sure I only paid a quarter for it. I have seen it as a CD-R bootleg, but not a real reissue. Will have to follow that tip to the COLLECTORS CHOICE catalog. And the killer lead off... "Bad Day At Black Rock, Baby." One that has an eerie sound. Falling not to far from the, CRABBY APPLETON- "Go Back" tree. Once heard, not soon forgotten. >From the LP cover notes... "Where they move through six sharps from 6/8 to 4/8 to 3/8 then 5/4 and even 5/8, changing rhythms with the quick ease of even the most wigged-out classic composer." Exploring the LP a bit... It's got one of those great inner sleeves with other (Dot/Paramount) albums pictured... that captures a sense of the time (c.68)... MISSION IMPOSSIBLE sdtk, GREG MORRIS (of Mission Impossible)- For You, There's a Whole LALO SCHIFFRIN Goin' On (<- Whatta title!), ODD COUPLE- Sdtk, KEN CURTIS (Festus from "Gunsmoke")- Calls Out, Two Sides Of LEONARD NIMOY, THE SPLIT LEVEL- s/t (Never heard of 'em)... alongside these from another time and place... THE MILLS BROTHERS, COUNT BASIE, BILLY VAUGHN, BONNIE GUITAR, "Era: The 30's/Recreated by FRANKIE CARLE", LIBERACE- The Love Album (!) I love these type of inner sleeves. Gone are the days. Have spent as much time looking at these inner sleeves while listening to an album as the actual cover. PS- Listers...? "Bad Day At Black Rock" "Songs w. Same Title As A Movies/But Not Otherwise Related." "Dr. Mark" Hill * The Doctor Of Pop Culture -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:32:45 -0500 From: Mark Hill Subject: Elvis & Abba > Elvis Costello, we might as well mention the sour allusion to > "Dancing Queen" in Costello's "When I Was Cruel No. 2." Don't know that one, but I heard Elvis himself (on TV) speak of the piano break in "Oliver's Army", being inspired by "Dancing Queen." "Dr. Mark" Hill * The Doctor Of Pop Culture -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:13:39 -0500 From: Mark Hill Subject: Fake Skipping Records > WHILE THE RECORD GOES AROUND//gimmick of reproducing a faulty record Kind of like: CURTIS LEE- "Pretty Little Angel Eyes" (07/61) and THE BEATLES- "Tell Me Why" (c.64) sound like syncopated, stuck/skipping records at the beginning of each. // Oh, no! One more list to start. More, please... "Dr. Mark" Hill * The Doctor Of Pop Culture -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:44:38 -0500 From: John Clemente Subject: The Beatle Myth Hello All, The heat is on concerning this British Invasion thing! I must agree with Doc Rock about the Beatle myth. Growing up in the Bronx during the early and mid-sixties, the British Invasion simply meant a new sound entering the American music spectrum. There are several points that are often hammered by artists and fans alike and I think are not entirely true. First, since I am a part of the Northern New Jersey group harmony scene, I often hear from a lot of people who are "died in the wool" 50s group harmony fans that The Beatles killed vocal groups, therefore they hated the British Invasion. Many New York vocal groups singing what I guess in retrospect would be considered an older style in 1963 were more popular on their own turf than they were nationally, so maybe it seemed to THEM that The Beatles killed their careers, especially some of the male white groups. There was sentiment as early as 1961 that older group harmony was disappearing, hence the whole NY revival- reissue thing going on in the early 60s and the rise of The Time Capsule Show on Fordham's WFUV in NY in March of '63, almost a year before the British Invasion. What we now call doo-wopp was a dying style nationally by 1963. Actually, it was never a nationally dominant style either. What I would consider youth-oriented music didn't start dominating the nationals until 1961. If vocal groups wanted to stay current, they were morphing into sounding like Detroit's Temps, Volumes, and Reflections; NYCs Four Seasons, Manhattans and Randy & The Rainbows. "Denise" is an especially good example because 50s fans refers to it as a late doo-wopp. It isn't. Listen to the chord structure. It sounds like a Buddy Holly song, the same person who influenced (gasp!) The Beatles. With all due respect to them, I have heard members of groups like the Shirelles and Cleftones, who made their marks in the 1950s and early 60s, site Beatlemania as their downfall. Have you ever heard The Cleftones' 1964 single on Ware Records, "He's Forgotten You"? WE should forget it. What were their producers thinking? Product like THAT is what killed The Cleftones. The Shirelles last BIG, BIG hit was "Foolish Little Girl" which was popular in the spring of '63, nine months prior to Beatlemania. If anything killed The Shirelles career as hitmakers, it was their discovery that they were being deceived by Florence Greenberg. There was no way Greenberg was going to promote them after that. They had also had their run, 60-63. The Supremes, another group cited for the demise of The Shirelles' career only had 64-67 before every other single started to slip from the Top 40, the same time lapse. Also, the late Alan Betrock hit the nail on the head when he said it was easier and potentially more lucrative to push solo artists like Dionne Warwick. Just check the WABC and WMCA charts on the Web, which will give all the NYC playlists. (You don't even have to leave the house!) The Cash Box charts are also interesting during the time period between mid-63 and mid-64, as they seemed more "hip" than Billboard. The NYC charts amaze me because it explains how beat up copies of records which we now regard as rare keep popping up at yard sales in NY/NJ. The girl-group thing was REALLY big in NYC in 1963 and 1964. Records also hung on longer then, so you would hear a record from '62 on the radio often in '64. And what about soul-oriented music, in my opinion, starting in '59 with songs like Barrett Strong's "Money" and The Falcons' "You're So Fine". Or the sounds of New Orleans? Chris Kenner, Barbara George, Lee Dorsey, The Dixie Cups, all between 1961 and 65. What about the Beach Boys? Their sound kicked in in 1961 and (actually) never left! Soul and Rock instrumentals like Duane Eddy and The Ventures, edging people on to learn to play guitars, three to four years before The Beatles. I could go on and on, but....you get the picture. Okay, start throwing the stones! Regards, John Clemente -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 22:56:01 -0500 (EST) From: ACJ Subject: Re: Mary Hopkin It's great to see some nice things being said about Mary Hopkin for a change. I had her "Post Card" album when I was a kid, and I loved it, but could only play it when certain family members were out of the room - those members who sneered at her as "Mary Poppins." ACJ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 23:03:13 -0500 (EST) From: ACJ Subject: Stickers Phil Milstein: No, I never used to save those stickers "back in the day"; but I do now, especially when I find an old LP that's still in its plastic wrap. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 23:18:51 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: lo fi Joe Nelson wrote: > That whole record fits the bill in my book. Something about > poor sound quality has always made records stand out for me. I think poor sound quality draws the listener in closer to the music (not necessarily literally), and forces him or her to listen more intently. The first time I heard Daniel Johnston, for instance, I practically had to crawl inside the damn speakers, but it was worth getting my clothes dirty for. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 00:10:58 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Vocal treatments of Instrumentals Mikey wrote: > I also might add that The Lettermen had a nice hit in 1965 with their > EXCELLENT version of "Theme From A Summer Place" done in their stunning > three part vocal style. Has anyone heard Bette Midler and Barry Manilow harmonizing on 'Slow Boat To China'? Barry sings Everly stylee below the melody line. A surefire spectropop pleaser. jb/past manilow hater -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 00:04:07 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Beatles Bands Al Kooper wrote: > In case any of you missed it, theres an album called Faith Hope & > Love by Kings X on Atlantic, About 9 years old I think. This is the > best pseudo Beatle album I ever heard because it supposes what The > Beatles might've sounded like in the 90's. I'll send ya your money > back if ya dont like it! Does it top Utopia's 'Deface The Music'? JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 00:08:26 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Songs that "quote" others Doug Richard wrote: > Of course "You Got A Lot Of Nerve To Say You Are My Friend" was the > first verse of his previous hit "Positively 4th Street" I distinctly dismember our own Phil Milstein playing this on the radio. And thinking that THIS was truly Dylan's best ever rekkid.. jb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 02:03:58 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Jimmie Cross Now playing at musica, "The Ballad Of James Bong," by Jimmie Cross, the follow-up to his "I Want My Baby Back" hit. This one is Tollie 9044, writing credit is to Botkin-Garfield-Cross-Price-Cole, with the first two names listed as producers. It plays sort of as a cut-in without any actual cut-ins. I'd kind of turned my nose up at it here a few weeks back, but it's really not half-bad, and has some amusing satirical references. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 17:53:31 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: A rather special Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update Oh you lucky people... The first part of a full an extremely rare interview with Jack Nitzsche is ready to hear on http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/radio.htm and it makes for fabulous listening. In this first part, Jack discusses his early beginnings in Michigan, working at Specialty Records, copying for H.B. Barnum, his respect for Leiber & Stoller and admiration for arranger Stan Applebaum. You'll kick yourself if you miss it! Another treat in store is at http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/ahjnrotw.htm in the form of an unreleased backing track recorded at Gold Star by some of the cream of the West Coast session musicians with backing vocals by, Gracia Nitzsche, Clydie King, Jackie Ward and Suzy Tallman on an Al Hazan written and produced track with arrangement by Jack Nitzsche. Oh yes and a riotous piece of piano playing by the guy that DIDN'T write "This Diamond Ring"! Carol Kaye, a good friend to Spectropop and Jack Nitzsche's site, reviews the track and the times in which it was recorded. In all this excitement I nearly forgot The Record of the Week on http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm This week it's Bobby Jason with "Venus" on Chancellor. Next week, the choice is between two records that were on my wants list for a long, long time: Dorothy Berry, "The Girl Who Stopped The Duke Of Earl" and Bobby Crawford, "Mrs Smith Please Wake Up Joan". Enjoy! Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:21:59 EST From: Ed Rambeau Subject: Re: Portrait of Ed Rambeau Julio writes: > Ed, I've been looking at the photos of your web page, and you > look amazingly great, younger than me (and you are the same > age than my father). You must have a magic portrait in your attic. Yeah, but you should see the portrait in the attic. Thanks, tho. Ed Rambeau -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2004 21:53:31 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: How Neato I wrote: > They played and recorded together over the years in a > number of bands including the group Old And The Way Should have read: "Old And In The Way" Sorry. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2004 03:46:15 -0000 From: Alan V. Karr Subject: Varispeed/Lloyd Thaxton ...of course DC5 Over & Over was sped up- check out the harmonica solo. Done accidently on purpose. Joe Meek was a firm believer that no record could not benefit from the extra zest given by speeding up the performance a tad. Lloyd Thaxton-at the age of 5 I was a regular viewer on Saturday afternoon/evenings I seem to recall it being on WPIX TV Ch. 11 in NY. Used to love a bit of schtick I remember where a record was stopped and all the dancers had to freeze - true? Lloyd's pic at the center of the cover of the Beau Brummels' San Fran sessions CD box set (apparently interviewing the drummer) brought back the memories. Regards, Alan V. Karr -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

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