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Spectropop - Digest Number 1243



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. "In The Rain"
           From: Ron Dante 
      2. Re: Louie Louie re-entry
           From: Phil Milstein 
      3. Re: Welcome to Ron Dante
           From: Laura 
      4. Re: Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East
           From: Ron Dante 
      5. Re: Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East
           From: Ron Dante 
      6. Re: Welcome the legendary Artie Butler!
           From: Glenn 
      7. Castanets
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      8. Re: Beatles For Sale
           From: Richard Hattersley 
      9. Re: Beatles For Sale
           From: Paul Bryant 
     10. Re: "In The Rain"
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     11. Re: Variations On A Theme Called Hanky Panky
           From: Joe Nelson 
     12. Re: Macca Bass/speeding up
           From: Michael Carpenter 
     13. Re: Progressive Northern Soul?
           From: Jake Tassell 
     14. Northern Soul Audio
           From: Jake Tassell 
     15. Castanets / Answer Songs
           From: Mick Patrick 
     16. Alvin Robinson / NY drummers
           From: Richard Williams 
     17. "Out In The Streets"
           From: Artie Butler 
     18. Good morning, Ms. Grangerrrr!
           From: James Cassidy 
     19. "Goin' Down" by Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds
           From: Artie Butler 
     20. Re: Rapper DJs' use of vinyl records
           From: James Botticelli 
     21. "Unique"?  Well ...
           From: Chris Schneider 
     22. Re: Scooby-Doo
           From: Austin Roberts 
     23. Pet Sounds mix whoopsies - I'm Waiting For The Day
           From: Watson Macblue 
     24. Too many messages but..
           From: Martin Roberts 
     25. Re: Brilliant Tracks With One Inept Ingredient
           From: Mike McKay 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:23:05 -0000 From: Ron Dante Subject: "In The Rain" Mick Patrick wrote: > Welcome to S'pop, Ron Dante - Detergent, Archie, Cuff Link, > etc, etc, etc, etc. Great to have you with us. > As a celebration, I've posted one of your great early solo > 45s to musica: "In The Rain", released on Musicor 1090 in > 1965. It was written by Rosenfeld, engineered by Brooks > Arthur, arranged by Bert Keyes, and produced by Stan Kahan > (aka Bob Elgin). How's that for an all star line-up?! > Do you remember the session, Ron? If so, what studio was > used? The backing vocals are sensational. Who were those > gals? Listen to the track here: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ That was a great session. Don't remember the studio name but it was in The American Hotel in NYC. Lots of Red Bird records done there and I remember my friend Jeff Barry married one of the girls who worked for the studio that year. Didn't know all the singers in the background but one was Jeanie Thomas. Ron Dante -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:26:12 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Louie Louie re-entry Joe Nelson wrote: > As a result of which, he copied the mistake intentionally > years later when re-recording the track for Gusto Records. I've heard one or two c.1964 cover versions that replicate the re-entry error, seemingly without awareness that it WAS an error. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:36:36 -0000 From: Laura Subject: Re: Welcome to Ron Dante Artie Butler wrote: > A personal welcome to Ron Dante. I know Ron real well. > He is a class act as a talent and as a person. > We made tons of music together. Hi, Artie, Ron and all, Here's exhibit "A" for you: Check out this page on Ron's site, called "Did You Know?" The very first image you'll see is a screenshot showing Ron as producer of a song on Disney's "Little Mermaid" TV show, and Artie Butler as its arranger! http://www.rondante.com/didyouknow.html Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:27:19 -0000 From: Ron Dante Subject: Re: Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East JJ wrote: > Wonder if u can add some info on the Eight Day, i.e. I've got > their BEAUTIFUL, Kapp 67 LP, incl their MASTERPIECE, "Building > with a steeple"; I've also got a 45 by The Village East, MGM > (late 66?), and they also do "Building.." == almost identical > backing, though diff voices + guitar, if i remember correctly.... > Since both this records are Prod by Feldman, Dante & Allen (arr > by RD), u might have some info, if Eight Day/Village East, were > actually a "proper" group, or not. The Eight Day were a real group of singers from Pittsburgh that my partner Gene Allan knew. I was the Village East. I think we used the same track for both groups. One of the singers formed Wild Cherry and won a grammy for Play That Funky Music White Boy years later. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 20:27:19 -0000 From: Ron Dante Subject: Re: Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East JJ wrote: > Wonder if u can add some info on the Eight Day, i.e. I've got > their BEAUTIFUL, Kapp 67 LP, incl their MASTERPIECE, "Building > with a steeple"; I've also got a 45 by The Village East, MGM > (late 66?), and they also do "Building.." == almost identical > backing, though diff voices + guitar, if i remember correctly.... > Since both this records are Prod by Feldman, Dante & Allen (arr > by RD), u might have some info, if Eight Day/Village East, were > actually a "proper" group, or not. The Eight Day were a real group of singers from Pittsburgh that my partner Gene Allan knew. I was the Village East. I think we used the same track for both groups. One of the singers formed Wild Cherry and won a grammy for Play That Funky Music White Boy years later. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 21:03:31 -0000 From: Glenn Subject: Re: Welcome the legendary Artie Butler! Mick Patrick wrote: > Welcome to Spectropop the one and only Artie Butler, Brill > Building hero de-luxe! I'd like to join in welcoming you, Artie. You've been a major topic of discussion in S'Pop for a long time - in other words, we've been talking about you behind your back for years :) Of course, it's all been good! I know everybody has their favorite things by you. One of mine is definitely the song "Goin' Down" by Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds, which you co-wrote with Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter. This is unquestionably the most rockin' thing I've ever heard from Lambert & Potter, plus it has that wild and very atypical mid-section with the African-style percussion and jazzy flutes. So I've alway guessed that some of your contributions to the song may have been in those areas that Lambert & Potter had never ventured into before. Am I guessing right? Any particular memories or stories regarding the creation of this song? HJF&R have had some things on CD for years, but this is the one track I most wanted to come out on CD by them. In fact, it's one of my personal two or three most-wanted-on-CD tracks of anything by anybody! No false flattery intended here - it's the honest truth! It finally made it onto CD about a year and a half ago on a Japanese reissue of the first HJF&R album. I'm very happy! Thanks, Glenn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:19:17 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Castanets C. Ponti: > Your post echoes my comment to one of the moderators that some > posters on the web's Pop music sites are like Star Wars nerds. > There are those who were in the studios, performing the gigs etc, > and then there are those that weren't and want to discuss the > brand of castanets Phil used on "He's A Rebel"! Actually, I > wonder what they were.... Latin Percusssion, NJ Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 21:27:36 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Re: Beatles For Sale I love "I don't wanna Spoil the Party" as well. the intro to "What you're Doing" sounds to me like Roger Mcguinn may have used this as a template for Mr Tambourine Man's intro. I know he says Bach's Joy of mans desiring was an influence, but if you play both on a 12 string guitar, the notes are all the same just jumbled up. Having said that I would also agree that "for sale" is the weakest Beatle album (not including Yellow Sub). All the Lennon Mccartney tunes are great, but after Hard Days Night which was full of originals it's dissapointing to find tracks like "Mr Moonlight". For Me "Help" was a much better record. Richard http://www.wiz.to/richardsnow -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:29:11 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Beatles For Sale Steve Harvey wrote: > What?!?!?! You gotta be kidding! "I Don't Want To > Spoil the Party" is one of the best British Invasion > attempts at country/folk rock that ever was. Rosanne > Cash thought enough of it to do a cover as well. > "What You're Doing?" is terrific too Just goes to show. I consider myself a fairly major Beatles fan but every time I mention one of the three or four (out of how many?) I actually don't like, they set the rottweilers on me. So here's a piece of truly trivial Beatles info for you. On Live at the BBC, CD1, track 22 (Dear Wack), they do a request for someone who lives at 132 Perry Road, Sherwood, Nottingham. Well that's just round the corner from where I live now. So how about that. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:28:32 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: "In The Rain" Mick Patrick: > Welcome to S'pop, Ron Dante - Detergent, Archie, Cuff Link, > etc, etc, etc, etc. Great to have you with us. As a > celebration, I've posted one of your great early solo 45s to > musica: "In The Rain", released on Musicor 1090 in 1965. It > was written by Richard Rosenfeld, engineered by Brooks Arthur, > arranged by Bert Keyes, and produced by Stan Kahan (aka Bob > Elgin). How's that for an all star line-up?! Do you remember > the session, Ron? If so, what studio was used? The backing > vocals are sensational. Who were those gals? Ron Dante: > That was a great session. Don't remember the studio name but > it was in The American Hotel in NYC. Lots of Red Bird records > done there and I remember my friend Jeff Barry married one of > the girls who worked for the studio that year. Didn't know all > the singers in the background but one was Jeanie Thomas. Had to be Mirasound. No? And if it was Jeannie, it might have been Mikie and Ellie or maybe Lesley Miller and Toni Wine as well--that's my guess. The girl Jeff married was the sister of a fellow named Dean something or other who worked with Ron Frangipane. Next Alzheimer's patient please move to the keyboard. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:30:14 -0500 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Variations On A Theme Called Hanky Panky Ron Dante: > Hello. I was a member of (the Definitive Rock Chorale) which had > some wonderful studio singers as members. I didn't recall this > session until I saw Mike Rashkow's name and remembered him working > closely with Ellie Greenwich during those years. Hope he is well > and still making music. Ron, Glad to finally get to confirm this. About a year or so ago I emailed you and you said you didn't remember the project. I was trying to confirm that was indeed your legendary and distinctive voice singing lead on "Mirrors Of Your Mind", the DRC's single before "Variations...". If you still have the CD I sent to you, great: if not, email me offlist with your webmaster's addy and I'll hook him up with a nice compact MP3 file. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2004 09:07:20 +1100 From: Michael Carpenter Subject: Re: Macca Bass/speeding up Hey gang.. I wrote: > Maybe Macca had some intonation problems on his Hofners around > the middle of the neck. Owning a few of those over the years, > I wouldn't be surprised. In fact Band On The Run's bass, as > mentioned is another post Then Peter wrote: > Was Paul not using a Rickenbacker on 'Band On The Run'? I presumed > it was but I might be wrong. Of course, The Rickenbacker was being used almost exclusively post 65..sorry to not make that point clearer. My points were that it's amazing how dodgy his Hofners were in spots, and how he even his Ricky's had some interesting tunings. For somebody with obviously a great ear as Macca has, it always surprised me that such out of tune-ness of the bass was left on record. Having said that, always great tone though.. Just thought of another one.. Don't Let Me Down is quite bass pitchy.. and that's his first Hofner.. I'm really enjoying this thread. And it's amazing how many of these interesting 'mistakes' are the things we hang out for in old records. Over the weekend i was thinking about it a bit, and 2 of my favourites are 2 big hits that speed up, pretty dramatically. Honky Tonk Woman is a good 10-15 bpm faster than it's classic intro by the time it reaches the first chorus. i LOVE listening to that, and i wouldn't want it any other way. And the outro to The Bitch Is Back from Elton just takes off. Again, it works because the vibe of the song is just building and building, and the outro is such a fantastic release. 2 other quick things.. Free As A bird by the Threetles brings tears to my eyes. I reckon it's some of the best 'Beatles' harmony singing.. a wonderful track. As for mono mixes being the 'real' mixes. I've always been surprised in all the re-issueing of old stuff that mono mixes aren't more prevalent. I was so glad on the Motown singles box sets and Beatles singles and EP box sets to hear the mono versions. For trainspotters like us here on S'pop who know the stereo mixes were almost always quickly knocked off by house engineers, there's something unsatisfying about only having access to the stereo versions... like we're only getting part of the vision. Especially surprised the Beatles haven't made more use of the mono mixes in re-issues, especially as the first real bonofide stereo mix wasn't really made until 1969. MC -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 22:15:48 -0000 From: Jake Tassell Subject: Re: Progressive Northern Soul? Howard: > I don't understand the term 'destroying' rare soul records.. > could you explain what this is supposed to refer to?? Jimmy B: > Howard...from what I understand, Brits would come to America > seeking lost soul rekkids in warehouses, basements of rotting > old soul record shops in third-rate cities, ship's ballast, in > short, anywhere there were records to be found and even more > desirable if you got filthy dirty diggin' through damp moldy > stacks. Then, the story goes, a product known as Vymura was > applied to the labels of the rekkids to remove them so that > turntable sniffers couldn't identify and seek out the rekkid > being played, thereby giving the DJ the exclusivity cachet. The record would then turn up as a 'cover up', with a made up artiste name (usually Bobby-something-or-other). There are also stories of records actually being destroyed to preserve their rarity. A practise which marks the thin-line between fandom and psychopathy, IMO. Jake -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 22:32:58 -0000 From: Jake Tassell Subject: Northern Soul Audio Anyone interested in Northern Soul should check out Nick Rennies audio site: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/nick.rennie/ There's a lot of really breathtaking stuff in there Jake -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 22:43:53 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Castanets / Answer Songs C. Ponti: > Your post echoes my comment to one of the moderators that some > posters on the web's Pop music sites are like Star Wars nerds. > There are those who were in the studios, performing the gigs etc, > and then there are those that weren't and want to discuss the > brand of castanets Phil used on "He's A Rebel"! Actually, I > wonder what they were.... But there are no castanets on "He's A Rebel". Signed, A. Nerd The S'pop Team: > New @ S'pop Recommends - "Midnight Cryin' Time". Budget conscious > S'poppers might already be aware of the great value for money > offered by the Castle Pulse logo's themed 3 CD sets. Their latest > release, subtitled "Teen Angst Classics From The Rock 'n' Roll > Era", is the latest addition to the S'pop Recommends section. > Mike Edwards is your reviewer: > http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/index2003.htm#MidnightCryinTime And talking of answer records, "Midnight Cryin' Time" is a good source of those too: Ginger & the Snaps "I'm No Runaround" (Dion "Runaround Sue") Esau Isaac "Poison Pen" (Marvelettes "Please Mr Postman") Jimmy Cross "I Want My Baby Back" (Shangri-Las "Leader Of The Pack") Bobby Comstock "Your Boyfriend's Back" (Angels "My Boyfriend's Back") Hey la (HA!), Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 22:43:49 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Alvin Robinson / NY drummers 1. Welcome to Artie Butler, and a question: did you arrange "Fever" for Alvin Robinson (the B-side of "Down Home Girl")? It's one of my favourite records. If you did, do you remember who played on it? Particularly the vibes and trumpet, but also string bass and drums. I saw Robinson playing guitar with the Ikettes on tour in the UK in '64 or '65. What a talent he had. 2. Great to get information about New York session drummers of the '60s. We know a lot more about Earl Palmer and Hal Blaine in LA, Benny Benjamin, Pistol Allen and Uriel Jones in Detroit, Al Duncan and Maurice White in Chicago and Al Jackson Jr in Memphis than we do about Panama Francis, Gary Chester, Buddy Salzmann, Herbie Lovell and Bill Lavorgna in NYC. More please from anyone with memories to relate! Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:44:02 EST From: Artie Butler Subject: "Out In The Streets" Hi Phil, Thanks for sending me the song "Out In The Streets". Wow! I have not heard it in ages. I must confess I do not remember the actual session after all this time. Whatever is in the orchestration I did out of pure instinct, as did all of us way back then. When we made these records, who ever thought that almost 40 years later they would be around. It is so nice to know that our work is still out there, and nice to hear that somehow it touched people. After all, isn't that what music is supposed to do? As far as asking why the percussion player did not play until the end of the record, I can only assume that perhaps he could not find a place to park, and he got there as soon as he could. In this case, the end of the record. (only fooling) Best regards, Artie Butler -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:06:28 -0500 From: James Cassidy Subject: Good morning, Ms. Grangerrrr! The recent posting of Gerri Granger's "Just Tell Him, etc." to Musica reminded me of her many TV appearances back in the day. In addition to being a fine singer, she was a charming and attractive guest, although more of a Vegas circuit act than a pop/rock singer. When I Googled her name to find her present whereabouts, I came up with the following from an organization called "Salute America" that gives awards to Americans for "extra effort". Ms. Granger is a founder and board member, alongside the omnipresent Carol Connors, oddly enough. Here's the bio for her: "Ms. Granger is presently an English teacher in New Jersey working with prison inmates to provide them a new start. Ms. Granger is a singer and entertainer. She appeared on the Johnny Carson show over 45 times, the Mike Douglas Show, Steve Allen Show, and the Ed Sullivan Show. She toured the world with Sammy Davis, Jr. as his opening act. She has appear in Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe with Redd Foxx, Joey Bishop, Totie Fields, and others. She has recorded for 20th Century Fox, headlined at the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, worked at the Apollo, and opened for the legendary Sam Cooke." Mick Patrick, can you tell us how many former Spectropop-era female singers later pursued teaching careers? Something tells me it's a large percentage, closely followed by nursing. Jim Cassidy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:49:57 EST From: Artie Butler Subject: "Goin' Down" by Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds Hi Glenn, Thanks for your kind words regarding "Goin' Down." I remember writing it and being very excited about it getting recorded. I have not heard it in years, so I can't comment on the record. I just remember liking it. I have gotten many letters over the years about the song. Thanks for writing. Regards, Artie Butler -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:53:31 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Rapper DJs' use of vinyl records Paul Bryant wrote: > Everything a band does to perform is done to look cool. No? > You wouldn't say that if you'd ever seen the Pogues live. Were they cool? or its antithesis? I guess I'm an iconoclast at heart. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 14:45:50 -0800 (PST) From: Chris Schneider Subject: "Unique"? Well ... steveo: > ... Incidentally, that one part you mention where Paul's voice > cracks on some versions ... on the word "vain" ... the > interval of vocal harmony is unique. A major seventh in the > vocal? Strange then and strange now -- you will never hear it > elsewhere. Just another unique "Beatleism." What, never? Well, *hardly* ever ... Of course, the question is whether "a major seventh in the vocal" means a single voice making the leap of a major seventh, which is the way I initially understood it, or multiple voices singing a major-seventh chord. An example of the first can be heard in the Sondheim song "Anyone Can Whistle," which I referred to a while back, at the word "all" in the phrase "It's all so simple." Listen to Jackie Cain on her 1982 "Sondheim" album, Barbara Cook on the "Sings Mostly Sondheim" album (2001), or Anita Ellis on "Look To The Rainbow" (2003). An example of the latter, and one that's a little closer to Spectropop territory, is the Beach Boys version of "Walk On By" that's on the reissued "Friends"-"20/20" combo. The word "cry," in "I break down and cry" -- which is their "fade out" phrase -- is a major-seventh G chord, with the F-sharp on top. I'm sure that many other examples can be found. (Anyone care to name 'em?) Those just happen to be the two that occurred to me. Chris -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 18:12:38 EST From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Scooby-Doo Bob wrote: > Who recorded the Scooby-Doo theme song, notable particularly > for the tune--Austin Roberts did you work at all on this? > Was it just Hanna-Barbera studio singers--and who penned it? Guy: > The Scooby Doo theme was written by David Mook, who worked > mainly in the TV and advertising field but whose name I've > seen on one or two pop records, and Ben Raleigh whose name > will be well known to those Spectropoppers with an eye for > the small print. I'd sure be interested in finding out who > sang on it - I've always thought it sounds exactly like the > 1910 Fruitgum Company. David Mook was also involved in the > Banana Splits records alongside such recently mentioned names > as Irwin Levine and Jimmy Radcliffe. I wrote some of the original songs and sang all the leads. The Bgd. group was Sue Steward, Mike Stull and myself. David Mook was a cool guy to deal with. I did a few things with him. Also did one (I think, just one) vocal for a Fruitgum cut and wrote one song for them. Since One is the loneliest number, they must not have liked my vocal or my song much. Austin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:14:04 -0800 (PST) From: Watson Macblue Subject: Pet Sounds mix whoopsies - I'm Waiting For The Day The chat on Here Today and the bad edit in Wouldn't It Be Nice are neither the only nor the worst mix horrors on Pet Sounds. The one that gets me every time (to the extent of spoiling the track for me) is at the end of I'm Waiting For The Day. Listen carefully when Brian sings the phrase "when you can love again" for the last time. This was obviously punched in directly over a previous take; when Brian reaches the end of the second syllable of "again", the punch-in ends abruptly, and the tail of the earlier take leaps out for a split second. The engineer should have wiped at least till the end of the next measure before punching out - it's not as though there's something else nearby on the same track (surely?) that needed to be preserved. An engineer who dropped a stitch that big these days could reasonably expect a spell in the Re-Education Camps. It's one of the things that gets fixed in the stereo mix (which, let me say immediately, I otherwise loathe - the stereo Sloop John B and You Still Believe In Me are unlistenable in my book). Watson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 23:13:39 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Too many messages but.. Surely the list at present will tax even Country Paul's ability to 'catch-up' there is just so much going on. The last look at the membership list 1210 and it appears each and everyone is writing at least two messages a day. Now the list is positively alive with many of my 'pop hero's' chatting away and sharing such enthralling stories, simply too much for this star struck English boy to cope with! Well almost too much, how about Paul Bryant's boast of living around the corner from 132 Perry Rd!!! Thanks to James Holvay for the gen on the Taylor Brothers but what about that co-writing credit on Abel And Kane? Was my assumption right? "I'll put your record on a big label you give me a cut on the take". :-) Terrific to have Artie Butler, Ron Dante, LLoyd Thaxton....on the list but feel you're gonna have to go some to match Mike Rashkow's hilarious Sam Chalpin story! But no thanks Mike I'll manage without hearing the record. :-) Congratulations to our moderators for keeping up with the m essages and finding the time to put up the new articles from Mike, Phil's amusing piece on Kim Fowley's CD, Peter's empathy shown towards Bobby Hatfield, Laura's piece on her pal, Ron Dante and....Oh yes, helping to maintain the exceedingly high standards of Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop! Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 18:22:41 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Brilliant Tracks With One Inept Ingredient Mark wrote: > in "Johnny B. Goode" by Chuck Berry, during the first guitar solo: > the piano player is supposed to hit a note on the piano with the > rest of the band, but he's off by a second and it's very audible. And there's the very last note of the guitar solo midway through "Roll Over Beethoven," when Chuck somehow hits an open string that's very much NOT a part of the chord of the moment. I'd have to sit down and figure out exactly what is going on at that juncture, but it definitely hurts. Luckily, it's over so quickly that it doesn't really detract from what I think is perhaps Chuck's greatest song and finest moment on record. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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