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Spectropop - Digest Number 1241



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 27 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Tuff stuff
           From: Howard 
      2. Re: First Gears - The In Crowd
           From: Howard 
      3. Re:Long After Tonight Is All Over
           From: Howard 
      4. Welcome Ron Dante
           From: Mick Patrick 
      5. Re: Progressive Northern Soul?
           From: Howard 
      6. Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East
           From: JJ 
      7. Re: Long After Tonight Is All Over
           From: Ken Silverwood 
      8. If I Fell / Free As A Bird
           From: Peter Kearns 
      9. Re: Drummer on 4 Seasons' "Dawn"
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     10. McCartney Bass
           From: Peter Kearns 
     11. Re: Help album
           From: Peter Kearns 
     12. Re: How about brilliant tracks with ONE inept ingredient!
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     13. Re: Welcome to Ron Dante and thanks for remembering me.
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     14. The Butler Did It - S.O.S. (Heart In Distress)
           From: Mick Patrick 
     15. Re: You're Gonna Lose That Girl / Help album
           From: Peter Kearns 
     16. Re: British cover versions
           From: Frank 
     17. Re: Chiffons / Mousketeers
           From: Jimmy Crescitelli 
     18. Re: Welcome the legendary Artie Butler!
           From: Jonathan Singer 
     19. Re: British cover versions
           From: Fred Clemens 
     20. Re: Mousketeers
           From: Phil Hall 
     21. Re: Last Kiss
           From: Fred Clemens 
     22. Re: Austin Roberts
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     23. Re: Kestrels
           From: Rat Pfink 
     24. Re: Brilliant Tracks With One Inept Ingredient
           From: steveo 
     25. Re: the first mouseketeers
           From: Artie Butler 
     26. Re: British cover versions
           From: Fred Clemens 
     27. Re: our new Spectropoppers
           From: C. Ponti 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 06:07:41 EST From: Howard Subject: Re: Tuff stuff Artie Butler asked about Tuff sing-a-long flipsides: > I would be very interested in knowing what other 7" Tuff records > you speak of. Jules Normington: > mind you the later output contained some very fine northern soul > killers between '65 and '67....Bobby Treetop (where'd he get a > name like that???), Kendra Spotswood, E. Rodney Jones, the great > Vicki Anderson wandered in for one 45, Little Joe Romans, Jimmie > Raye...jeez, their hit rate for absolute (though-admittedly- > obscure-but-what-the-hell) classics post-Jaynetts would outdo > almost ANY other label...maybe even Motown included....' course I > don't want to step on too many toes with that call...but HEY! You're so right about Tuff's Nothern Soul pedigree. A highly collectable label here in the UK. Bobby Treetop & E. Rodney Jones were the same artist, with E.R.J's "R & B Time" sharing the same backing track as B.T's "Wait Till I Get To Know You" and wasn't "R & B Time (part2)" the instrumental of the top side? Howard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 06:13:40 EST From: Howard Subject: Re: First Gears - The In Crowd Tim: > "The In Crowd" by First Gear is available on the Castle label > 2CD "Jimmy Page and his heavy friends" (NEECD 486). The record > was produced by Shel Talmy and Jimmy Page contributed guitar > during his time as a session musician. Thanks Tim, (and others who replied to this post). Howard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 06:30:07 EST From: Howard Subject: Re:Long After Tonight Is All Over Ken Silverwood: > am a great lover of the above song since buying Jimmy Radcliffe's > recording of it back in 64/65. Since then I have found other > versions by Dusty Springfield, Irma Thomas, Paris Sisters & > recently Julie Rogers. I have a version on tape which I would > like to play to musica when the space comes available, as I don't > have a clue who the female singer is. Does anyone know of any > other versions? I suspect the 'uknown' female version you have on tape may be Christine Quaite, who's version came out on UK Stateside (as did Jimmy Radcliffe originally). I'm sure one of the American members will tell you what it's US release label was. (without me having to get into the loft to ckeck it out : - ) all the best.. Howard ps.. The Julie Rogers version must rate as one of the worst cover versions of all time!!!! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 11:40:00 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Welcome Ron Dante Welcome to S'pop, Ron Dante - Detergent, Archie, Cuff Link, etc, etc, etc, etc. Great to have you with us. As a celebration, I've posted one of your great early solo 45s to musica: "In The Rain", released on Musicor 1090 in 1965. It was written by Rosenfeld, engineered by Brooks Arthur, arranged by Bert Keyes, and produced by Stan Kahan (aka Bob Elgin). How's that for an all star line-up?! Do you remember the session, Ron? If so, what studio was used? The backing vocals are sensational. Who were those gals? Listen to the track here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 06:49:05 EST From: Howard Subject: Re: Progressive Northern Soul? Jimmy Botticelli: > Pardon a Yank's ignorance, but is that not what Northern Soul > is about to begin with? The discovery, airing, and label > destroying of rare soul records? Hey James, you're no more ignorant than the vast majority of music fans on both sides of the Atlantic when trying to define the complex world of northern soul and their followers : - ) I was once asked how "northern soul" was coined and other questions around it here's what I put together as an answer to him, I hope this goes some way to giving an uderstanding of the northern soul scene... The term originated from an article written by Soul scribe Dave Godin in the UK magazine 'Blues & Soul', when he commented that the people in the south (of England) seemed to have lost interest in soul music while in the north people were still 'keeping the faith', hence the term 'nothern soul' was born. In the sixties the Mod scene was born, this 'elitist' group adopted American soul music as their chosen sound, as the Mod culture lost favour in the south of England to be superceded by the next fashion trends, die hard northern (and the midlands) of england mods continued to follow the soul scene of the sixties, and clubs were popular with that 'scene' through the seventies with Mods evolving into northern/rare soul fans. The most famouse of these was THE TWISTED WHEEL CLUB in Manchester, which had evolved from an R&B club into a SOUL club that became legendary. Of course there were many more to spring up as others closed their doors, amongst the most well known club around the world 'THE WIGAN CASINO', both these clubs were to be found in Lancashire, a county in the NORTH of England. When asked what makes a soul record a northern soul record, then the problems arise! The original 'sound' was based around 4 beats to the bar pounding dance music (often refered to as 100mph dancers or 'Stompers') With obscure Detroit labels dominating the procedings, Motown, Ric Tic, Golden World and of course lots of smaller labels from that era. Later Chicago & Philadelphia records also became VERY popular. Then of course collectors searched the whole of the USA for obscure records that might fit the northen soul 'tag'. As you rightly point out in your mail, not all northern soul records were by black artists or in some cases not even by American artists. Many DJ's of the period looked out for records of a certain beat/ tempo/feel. and there are certainly some strange titles & artists that have 'found' there way onto the northern soul scene, causing many arguements between 'purists' who believe that only 'real soul' can be sung by black artists, and those that only were interested in the 'beat' and that they could dance to it (northern soul style!) Nowadays, northern soul is even more difficult to pigeon hole, as the scene has splintered into various factions, with R&B, 6T's Soul, 70's and even new records being accepted onto the scene. Thebottom line is one of exclusivity/rareness of the records being played, DJ's are still searching for that magical 60's dancer that no one else has heard of!!! I could go on forever without fully answering your question on northern soul, I still attend all nighters (venues that play 60's soul through the night till 6.00/7.00am) and I love the scene, producing the fanzine 'Soul Up North' gives me a great excuse to act like I did in the 60's & 70's along with many others around my age :-) .. with regard to your last statement: > .but is that not what Northern Soul is about to begin with? The > discovery, airing, and label destroying of rare soul records? I don't understand the term 'destroying' rare soul records.. could you explain what this is supposed to refer to?? cheers.. Howard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 12:17:12 -0000 From: JJ Subject: Ron Dante / Eight Day / Village East Hi Ron, Wonder if u can add some info on the Eight Day, i.e. ive got their BEAUTIFUL, Kapp 67 LP, incl their MASTERPIECE, "Building with a steeple"; ive also got a 45 by The Village East, MGM (late 66?), and they also do "Building.." == almost identical backing, though diff voices + guitar, if i remember correctly.... Since both this records are Prod by Feldman, Dante & Allen (arr by RD), u might have some info, if Eight Day/Village East, were actually a "proper" group, or not. Thanx in advance! JJ/Sweden -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 12:56:13 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Long After Tonight Is All Over Howard: > I suspect the 'uknown' female version (of "Long After Tonight Is > All Over") you have on tape may be Christine Quaite, who's version > came out on UK Stateside (as did Jimmy Radcliffe originally). I'm > sure one of the American members will tell you what it's US > release label was. (without me having to get into the loft to > ckeck it out : - ) > ps.. The Julie Rogers version must rate as one of the worst cover > versions of all time!!!! Many thanks for your response Howard, you could well be right, but we won't know for sure until you've heard it. Yeah, I'm not so fond of Julie's version as I am of the others. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:16:57 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: If I Fell / Free As A Bird > Another notable vocal is on the Beatles "If I Fell" > on which Paul McCartney has a high harmony to maintain > for the whole song - eventually his voice cracks, but > as they were really pushed for time they had to leave > it in. There are versions with and without the voice breakup. I believe this was only on the mono mix and only on the said mono mix for a certain issue/country. I'm not sure exactly. The final time Paul sings "was in vain" is the moment. The Beatles released recordings are a veritable minefield of these occurrences. They are everywhere. I still can't even tell the difference between the two versions of 'All You Need Is Love. But then I've never listened to them side by side either. All I can tell you is that when I heard 'Free As A Bird', I unexpectedly became weak at the knees and shed a tear. That record still amazes me. Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:22:52 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Drummer on 4 Seasons' "Dawn" Mike Edwards: > I was able to get a question in to the great arranger, > Charlie Calello and he says, without hesitation, that > Buddy Saltzman was the drummer on "Dawn". I dont remember who said this, but Saltzman was called the East Coast's version of Hal Blaine, a workhorse who was on many 60's-70's sessions in NYC. He played on the majority of the 4 Seasons recordings. > Didn't Buddy Saltzman also play on the Archies records? > The snare fills on "Feeling So Good" are awesome! I think Ron Dante or Jeff Barry mentioned him as their drummer. I still love the booming sound Bob Crewe gave him on many of his productions. I have always wondered if Saltzman played on Gene Pitney's "It Hurts To Be In Love" and the great B-side (co-written by Al Cooper) "Hawaii". Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:23:31 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: McCartney Bass Michael Carpenter wrote: > Maybe Macca had some intonation problems on his Hofners around > the middle of the neck. Owning a few of those over the years, > I wouldn't be surprised. In fact Band On The Run's bass, as > mentioned is another post Was Paul not using a Rickenbacker on 'Band On The Run'? I presumed it was but I might be wrong. Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:32:59 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: Re: Help album Paul Bryant wrote: > Absolutely not! Way I see it, A Hard Day's Night was a truly great > album (and all Lennon/McCartney songs). Beatles For Sale was the > backward step, a fairly listless beast and some mediocre songs > (What you're Doing, I don't want to spoil the party). Then Help! > was somewhat better I guess all the early ones had their weak tracks; 'Act Naturally', though a very well written song, seemed somewhat flippant on 'Help', but then we know that already. 'Beatles For Sale' seemed a more cohesive album to me. Though 'Help' had the landmark of 'Yesterday', it stuck out like a sore toe, somewhat demanding more dignified company. Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:41:34 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: How about brilliant tracks with ONE inept ingredient! > In Beach Boy obsessive fan circles there are lists of > records with noises left in - this happens even on Pet > Sounds (on the song Here Today). So Wendy is not an > isolated incident. > Another notable vocal is on the Beatles "If I Fell" > on which Paul McCartney has a high harmony to maintain > for the whole song - eventually his voice cracks, but > as they were really pushed for time they had to leave > it in. And you can only hear those mistakes only on the stereo mixes. On the mono mixes they were corrected. Like Motown, mono versions were carefully mixed and the stereo versions were quickly done, sometimes by a staff engineer. I have also wondered about monitoring equipment in 60's studios, and what volume they mixed down at. I have seen old photos where they had big Altec Lansing "Voice of The Theatre" speakers and others that looked like the P.A. speakers at your church or supermarket. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 10:55:41 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Welcome to Ron Dante and thanks for remembering me. I'd like to join in the cheers and welcome to our new member, the incomparable Ron Dante. (Are we knocking them dead or what-- Butler one day, Dante the next. I guess the only thing that could top that two day duo would be a note from Phil S.) Not only has Ron been an exceptional contributor to the world of music as a singer, but also as Barry Manilow's producer among a list of credits that I couldn't even begin to recite--and that would fill more pages than one of my typical war stories. Several years ago I was excited and amazed when attending the wonderful Broadway revival of "Guys and Dolls" to look at the Playbill and see that the FIRST name listed as the producer was Ron Dante--now that's a credit hard to top. I consider being noted in Ron's first post to S'pop personally special and meaningful. Following below are a couple of other things in response to the original post by one of Ron's biggest fans, Laura Pinto. Laura: > In today's Mr. Music column by Jerry Osborne, the single > "Variations on a Theme Called Hanky Panky" by the Definitive > Rock Choral is discussed. Mr. Osborne states that he came > across a "newsgroup posting" (meaning the Spectropop archives) > and quotes Mike Rashkow's recollections, which I found were > posted on 10/30/01....... > It was interesting for me to learn that Ron Dante was involved > with this recording. Now I need to hit eBay to look for a copy! Ron: > Hello. I was a member of this group which had some wonderful > studio singers as members. I didn't recall this session until I > saw Mike Rashkow's name and remembered him working closely with > Ellie Greenwich during those years. Hope he is well and still > making music. Thanks for remembering me. I am well physically and living near the Blue Ridge mountains in North Carolina after retiring from the advertising business. The only music I have made in many years has been on the golf course, but as many of us know, the dream dies hard and one never gives up hope. My happiest years were those few I spent in the studios of NYC--so if you're looking for any material... Once, after listening to a vocal I had done on a demo, (which EG and I were going to replace with your voice) you said, "hey, that's not so bad". Believe me, that was like hearing a personal blessing from the Pope or a "great shot" from Tiger Woods. Those few kind words have always meant a great deal to me. I think you were involved to some extent on almost every Definitive Rock Chorale record that Ellie and I did--as I remember it, we wanted you to do all the leads but some contractual difficulties prevented that. Besides, I think there was a law against one man having the leads on more than 5 out of the top 10 chart records at the same time. Among the things which you sang on for us were four spec jingles EG and I wrote for Jean Nate'. I still have those and still enjoy hearing them. I hope someday to share those with S'Pop via musica. Again, welcome to Ron Dante, "the voice of an era" and a very fine human being. Michael Rashkow -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 14:08:44 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: The Butler Did It - S.O.S. (Heart In Distress) Rashkovsky to Artie Butler: > While everyone knows about Sally Go Round The Roses, and his early > work with Neil Diamond, I'd like to call your attention to two of > my favs from that same period: > > "S.O.S. (Heart In Distress)" by Christine Cooper on Parkway circa > 1966. Listen to how he used orchestra bells (is that the same as > glockenspiel?) and (I think) Vinny Bell's guitar together--kind of > doubling bells in a manner of speaking--to suggest Morse code. It's > a great idea, beautifully executed, and one of my all time favorite > records. It is also the session where I met my former wife Mikie > Harris and Ellie Greenwich and Jeannie (Thomas) Fox when they came > in to do the background vocals. This great record is now available @ musica. Take a listen, y'all: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 13:46:39 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: Re: You're Gonna Lose That Girl / Help album Steveo wrote: > Honestly,(as Carl Wilson used to say all the time) "Your'e > Gonna Lose that Girl" is terribly out of tune vocally when > the track first comes in, but they pull up to it ... Indeed they do. But that's my point. They would've had to pull up to other songs as well till they got it right. Why let this one go? Maybe cause it was somewhat a throwaway? Let us ponder that at this very time the boys were itching for unconquered territory, as 'Yesterday' bore out. They could be forgiven for tiring of yet another well written (plus lyrically negative) singalong. In fact, to open a real can of worms, there are many reasons why, production-wise, 'Help', could be considered the most uninteresting (and ultimately the closure) of the pre-Rubber Soul albums. Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:35:00 +0200 From: Frank Subject: Re: British cover versions Bill Craig wrote: > Is The Kestrels version of "There's A Place" available on CD? Or > if not do you have it to play to Musica? It's probably my favorite > Beatle song if I had to pick one. I don't think I've ever heard it > covered. One of the at the time "popular in the clubs", British singer named Bobby Samson did a really good cover of "There's a Place". Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 09:36:32 EST From: Jimmy Crescitelli Subject: Re: Chiffons / Mousketeers Let me interject a special tribute to the Chiffons; a poster mentioned their transcendent vocals on "What Am I Gonna Do with You." Indeed! These were untrained high school girls whose level of professionalism and expertise are still remembered by people like us forty years later! The class and perfection they brought to all their work is a high point in rock and roll; they should truly be in the R&R Hall of Fame. Mousketeers... another poster wondered how the originals were doing. There are sites out there that track the gang, though I couldn't point to any specifics: I don't have any bookmarked. When I was a kid, I wanted Annette to be my big sister (along with Shelley Fabares), and I wanted to marry Darlene Gillespie! Ah well... ! Jimmy Crescitelli -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 06:39:00 -0800 (PST) From: Jonathan Singer Subject: Re: Welcome the legendary Artie Butler! ...and let's not forget Artie Butler's "Down Home Girl" which he co-wrote with Jerry Leiber and cut on Alvin "Shine" Robinson. --Jonathan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:48:46 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: British cover versions Bill Craig wrote: > Is The Kestrels version of "There's A Place" available on CD? Or if > not do you have it to play to Musica? It's probably my favorite > Beatle song if I had to pick one. I don't think I've ever heard it > covered. > Wasn't there a Brit band called The Measles who covered Paul Revere > and The Raiders' hits? Sorry if they've already been mentioned. The Kestrels song is on CD, along with 29 others. It's on a double CD which also features the Eagles ('60's Brit band), with 30 tracks of their own. It's available (SMASH HITS FROM THE EAGLES AND THE KESTRELS) as an import on Sequel NEECD 296. I got my copy via http://www.101cd.com for about $12.00 US, as I recall. I tried getting it domestically and came up empty. It features all of their Pye and Picadilly sides. It misses their earlier Donegal sides and their in between Decca sides, but it does feature a previously unreleased cover of the Mystics "Don't Take The Stars". "There's A Place" features Roger Greenaway on lead, as do most of the Kestrels songs. The flip side, "Little Star" (NOT the Elegants song), features Tony Burrows up front. I'll put "There's A Place" to musica (if there's room) via RealAudio, but I heartily recommend seeking out the CD for the rest of their sides. It includes a massive fact-filled story page on both groups. Looking over the track listing, other songs that could be considered covers or remakes include: "I Can't Say Goodbye" (the Fireflies) "Wolverton Mountain" (Claude King) "Love Me With All Your Heart" (the Ray Charles Singers) "Walk Right In" (the Rooftop Singers) "Sherry" (the Four Seasons) "Speedy Gonzales" (Pat Boone) "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" (the Shirelles) "Michael, Row The Boat Ashore" (the Highwaymen) "Rhythm Of The Rain" (the Cascades) "Please, Please Me" (the Beatles) "Walk Like A Man" (the Four Seasons) "When I Fall In Love" (the Lettermen) "Dance With Me" (the Drifters) Seems the Beatles and Four Seasons were a favorite of Roger. When he teamed up with Roger Cook to become David and Jonathan, they did "Michelle" (their hit), "Let's Hang On", and "Yesterday". Recognizable Eagles covers on the CD include "Telstar", "Pipeline", and "The Lonely Bull". Fred Clemens -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:55:35 -0000 From: Phil Hall Subject: Re: Mousketeers A site that briefly details the current status of the Mousketeers who appeared in episodes during the first four seasons can be found at: http://www.whosaliveandwhosdead.com/oemouse.htm If I find a more informative site; I'll post it. Phil Hall -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 15:59:46 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: Last Kiss Bob Rashkow wrote: > The faltering soprano in "Last Kiss"! How could I have forgotten?! > But after the first few cringes I accepted it as a manifestation of > how blue Wilson feels, kind of like a distorted high note starting to > crumble. Doesn't make the song, natch! It's Wilson's great voice > and his arrangement (Hot 100 charts weren't any help to me here) > that make it great. The faltering soprano didn't happen the earlier time around when Wilson recorded the song. I have his version on the Tamara label, which preceded the Josie release, and it's a distinctively different (and better, IMHO, despite the faltering soprano) than the latter release. I understand Wilson first released the song on the LeCam label, but I don't know if it's the same or different from any of the later issues. Anybody?? Fred Clemens -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 11:11:24 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Austin Roberts Hi all, Austin Roberts has asked me to drop a note and explain his current disappearance. He is in the process of moving his home and studio back to Nashville, and is simply overwhelmed wiht the process. He asked me to post this information along with his apologies for lack of reponse to some recent questions. Specifically he wanted me to express his delight being part of S'pop and in the kindness shown to him by the members. As soon as he has regained his footing he'll be back on-line and back in the high life again. scoobey dooby doo (temporarily) Mike Rashkow -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 11:11:22 -0500 From: Rat Pfink Subject: Re: Kestrels Bill Craig wrote: > Is The Kestrels version of "There's A Place" available on CD? It's available on a 2CD compilation called "Beat Beat Beat #1: The Mersey Sound & Other Mop Top Rarities 1962-63" on the Sequel label. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 08:36:13 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Re: Brilliant Tracks With One Inept Ingredient Mark wrote: > I have to thank my good friend, Outsiders guitarist Tom King, > for pointing this one out to me some time back. > It's in "Johnny B. Goode" by Chuck Berry, during the first > guitar solo: the piano player is supposed to hit a note on the > piano with the rest of the band, but he's off by a second and > it's very audible. Mark, That bizarre offbeat timing and rhythmic offset by blues pianist Johnnie Johnston, Chuck's piano player, is an invaluable part of my enjoyment on Chuck's records. There's nothing quite like it, and I'm sure certain artists like the Rolling Stones would agree. When Chuck jams on his lead, I love hearing Johnnie behind him playing triplets or whatever else he comes up with. It's so untrained and funky ... bluesish. And while we're at it ... Mike Stoller! ... you did an excellent job playing blues piano behind Elvis on some of his early hits ... reportedly on "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You, and some others. I appreciate you Mike ... very much! Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 12:04:58 EST From: Artie Butler Subject: Re: the first mouseketeers Regarding Mousketeer Cubby O'Brien, I believe he lives in New York. He was playing in the pit for the show "The Producers." He also works with Bernadette Peters. He has for quite a long time. He is a real good drummer, and a nice man as well. Artie Butler -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 26 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:08:13 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: British cover versions Bill Craig wrote: > Is The Kestrels version of "There's A Place" available on CD? Or if > not do you have it to play to Musica? It's probably my favorite > Beatle song if I had to pick one. I don't think I've ever heard it > covered. Like I said in a previous response, it is available on CD. I've just uploaded the song to Musica for you to preview. It was taken from the original 1963 Piccadilly 45, not the CD. (The song is included on the CD.) Fred Clemens -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 27 Date: Sun, 11 Jan 2004 17:39:15 -0000 From: C. Ponti Subject: Re: our new Spectropoppers John Fox wrote: > On a separate, more serious note, I loved the comment about Artie > Butler being asked the Shangri-Las middle names. If any of you ever > saw the Saturday Night Live routine where William Shatner attends a > Star Trek convention and gets bombarded with trivia questions from > Trekkie nerds about specific episodes, it was hysterical, but I hope we > show folks like Artie and Lloyd Thaxton some respect by not inundating > them with minutiae-related questions. John, Your post echoes my comment to one of the moderators that some posters on the web's Pop music sites are like Star Wars nerds.There are those who were in the studios, performing the gigs etc, and then there are those that weren't and want to discuss the brand of castanets Phil used on "He's A Rebel"! Actually, I wonder what they were.... C Ponti -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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