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Spectropop - Digest Number 1225



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Jan & Dean backup
           From: Doug 
      2. Re: Changed titles
           From: Andrew Jones 
      3. Re: Left Banke's '70s LP
           From: JB 
      4. Re: Jan & Dean backup
           From: James Cassidy 
      5. Re: Bi and gay songs
           From: Steve Grant 
      6. Re: Poor quality pressings
           From: Andrew Jones 
      7. Re: Bi question......Not Jimmy & the Boys
           From: Mike McKay 
      8. Re: Rundgren on Wilson / Carla T. / Shatneresque
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: Grapefruit; Iveys
           From: Eddy 
     10. Re: Brian Wilson's last greatest song.....
           From: Paul Bryant 
     11. Man In The Bowler Hat
           From: Bryan 
     12. The Misunderstood
           From: Rat Pfink 
     13. Re: worst 45 pressing
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     14. Wilson, Wilco, Wayne, Weezer and Ben Folds.
           From: Peter Kearns 
     15. Apple books
           From: Bryan 
     16. Re: Words and melodies
           From: Paul Bryant 
     17. Re: Brian Wilson's influence
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     18. What About Jon Hendricks?
           From: Chris 
     19. Brian Wilson/Todd Rundgren
           From: Peter Kearns 
     20. Hello
           From: John Sellards 
     21. Re: Sally Go 'Round The Roses
           From: Dan Hughes 
     22. Shelley Fabares on CD
           From: Mick Patrick 
     23. Re: Jan & Dean backup
           From: Doc 
     24. Melodies Rule - The Words Just "Go On"
           From: Rex Strother 
     25. Re: The Saddest Story Ever Told
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 


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Message: 1 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 03:39:06 -0000 From: Doug Subject: Re: Jan & Dean backup Superoldies wrote: > I've never been able to find info of who the female vocal > partner is on Jan & Dean's rather strange tune "It's As Easy > As 1,2,3"...and even stranger than she has never been credited. > Anyone know? Jill Gibson, Jan's girlfriend at the time. Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:14:57 -0500 (EST) From: Andrew Jones Subject: Re: Changed titles Phil Chapman wrote re. Manfred Mann: > .....didn't they record the original version of "Semi-Detached, > Suburban Mr James", changed to "...Mr Jones" for the US cover? Manfred Mann did indeed record an early version of "Semi-Detached ...", however they changed "Jones" to "James" because original lead singer Paul Jones had just left the band. (I think - I know that Paul Jones was the motivation for the title change.) ACJ (no known relation to Paul) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 22:08:29 EST From: JB Subject: Re: Left Banke's '70s LP The same Left Banke album was released in the UK on the Bam Caruso label, perhaps the premier '80s psych-pop English reissue label. JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 21:40:10 -0500 From: James Cassidy Subject: Re: Jan & Dean backup Superoldies queried: > I've never been able to find info of who the female vocal > partner is on Jan & Dean's rather strange tune "It's As Easy > As 1,2,3"...and even stranger than she has never been credited. > Anyone know? I say: Unless I'm mistaken, it's Jill Gibson, Jan's girlfriend and the woman who "replaced" Michelle Phillips in the Mamas and the Papas temporarily. Jim Cassidy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:01:30 -0500 From: Steve Grant Subject: Re: Bi and gay songs And all the girls in the neighborhood Try to go out with David Watts They try their best but can't succeed For he is of pure and noble breed .... -- The Kinks, "David Watts" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:22:28 -0500 (EST) From: Andrew Jones Subject: Re: Poor quality pressings Billy G. Spradlin: Thank you for finally resolving one of the minor mysteries of my record-collecting life - why Mercury/Smash/Philips promo 45s always broke so darned easily. When I was a kid, I received a bunch of old promo 45s from said labels - within a few months, I had to throw most of them away because they'd either cracked too badly or just plain broke - and I knew I didn't treat them roughly at all. Now I know why they didn't last. ACJ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 01:24:44 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Bi question......Not Jimmy & the Boys Rich wrote: > Another Aussie song also by Jimmy & the Boys - "I'm not > like everyone else". J.D. Doyle replied: > Well, yes, it is an Aussie song, but it's not a bi or gay song. As someone besides me has no doubt pointed out, it's in fact a Kinks song...the B-side to "Sunny Afternoon." Are the lyrics posted actually what Jimmy and the Boys sing on their cover version? If so, they really mangled them. In many different spots they're miles away from what Dave Davies sings on the Kinks' original. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 23:49:56 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Rundgren on Wilson / Carla T. / Shatneresque Diane wrote: > Now, here's my toss on Brian Wilson's influence: How about Todd > Rundgren? His very melodic songs, his great harmonies, his > arrangements, with separate "movements". I don't know if Todd has > ever acknowledged a debt to Brian, but I feel Brian's stamp on Todd's > writing. Anyone else see this? Rundgren recorded a version of "Good Vibrations" on the "carbon copies" side of his 1976 "Faithful" album, in which he demonstrated his skills at studio mimicry. Also subjected to this treatment were "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago," "Rain," "Most Likely You Go Your Way And I'll Go Mine," "If Six Was Nine" and "Strawberry Fields Forever." from Liz Smith's column: > 'AND WHILE WE HAVE music on our mind, '60s pop diva Carla Thomas, > seen to great effect in the hit documentary "Only the Strong > Survive" (now on DVD), was pleased that 2004 pop diva Macy Gray > will portray her on NBC's "American Dreams". The two women might > even team up for some duets later this year. Carla's thrilled but > has one reservation. "I wish, on the show, that Macy had sang > something I'd written, like 'Gee Whiz'", she said. "Then, at > least, I'd get royalties!" ' Carla's daddy didn't raise no dummies! Roger Smith wrote: > If Shatner admitted the album was a joke, it wouldn't be quite as > funny. So whether or not he was serious when recording it, I think > it's best that he continues to defend it! Shatner's attempts to come to grips with the camp factor in his work fascinate me, as they address some very interesting questions of self-consciousness, in particular of the human defense mechanism which renders a person incapable of recognizing his own essential silliness. Shatner is, by now at least, clearly aware that his "singing" style (at least; many people view his regular acting technique in much the same way) is seen as the height of camp by a great many people. In fact he's even been happy to play up that angle when it suits him, yet it strikes me that he still doesn't understand exactly what it is about his style that tickle people so. The series of readings he did of lyrics nominated for Best Song (or Best Somethingorother) on MTV's Music Awards for several years running a few years back -- 2I Wanna Sex You Up," "You Could Have Been Mine," et al -- amply reveal this chasm of self-consciousness, in that they simultaneously achieve much of the strangeness of his original "singing" style as well as serve as a self-parody thereof. These latter-day readings don't measure up to his takes on "Lucy In The Sky" and "Mr. Tambourine Man" (nor of his less well-known yet equally bizarre TV takes of "Rocket Man," "Taxi" and "Why Can't A Woman Be More Like A Man"), yet they're still pretty screwy in their own right. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 08:56:32 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Grapefruit; Iveys Austin Roberts asked: > Was it Grapefruit that did "Maybe Tomorrow"? Austin, "Maybe Tomorrow" is by The Iveys. The Grapefruit did "Dear Delilah," which was their first 45 with Apple Publishing. There was no Apple label yet. And by the time there was, the relationship with Apple had soured so much that they went on to other pastures, in spite of the fact that both John and Paul had been actively involved in their career. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 01:29:41 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Brian Wilson's last greatest song..... Chris Ullman wrote: > another lost Brian Wilson "LP"/bootleg. The Andy Paley > Sessions from the mid 1990s features not only 20-25 > Brian songs, but also a set of vocals from Carl, possibly > the last he ever did. The record company ditched it as it > sounded "too sixties". This I do not understand - why would any record label turn down original material from Brian Wilson? Hasn't he long since become so revered record executives would love to issue anything he wants to do? pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 18:51:39 -0800 From: Bryan Subject: Man In The Bowler Hat Regarding the 'Man In The Bowler Hat' album by Stackridge, Mark Frumento wrote: > If/when there's room I'll post a track from 'Man in the Bowler Hat' > which sadly is out of print now. Actually, I'm not 100% sure it's out of print -- it was reissued by Edsel in 1996 and Amazon currently lists it as being available. Try this link: http://tinyurl.com/ypnkb Bryan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 20:54:25 -0500 From: Rat Pfink Subject: The Misunderstood Art Longmire wrote: > Thanks for the information, I never knew that the Misunderstood > material was licensed through Apple. I have been trying to get all > the Misunderstood's English tracks for years without success... There are two CDs by The Misunderstood currently available: "Before the Dream Faded" and "The Legendary Goldstar Album/ Golden Glass", both on the Cherry Red label. RP -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 10:18:25 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: worst 45 pressing I think the worst sounding but one of the greatest early rock recordings is Gary U.S. Bonds'"Quarter To Three" - I have it on original 45, on a vinyl LP and Rhino CD and they all sound like it was recorded with the microphone stuck in a closet or under a blanket! > Another Doug Richard brought to my attention years ago was the > Ides of March "You Wouldn't Listen". I have 1 clean copy and 6 > that look mint and play like crap. I have the Parrot 45 - mine was scratched up before I bought it, but I played it a lot until Sundazed re-issued it on their "Ideology" CD. Strangely, it was recorded at the same studio that the New Colony 6 recorded "I Confess" and my original Centaur 45 has more "punch" than than any CD reissue. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 12:17:14 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: Wilson, Wilco, Wayne, Weezer and Ben Folds. Ruby wrote: > I definitely agree with this comment about Fountains of Wayne. > Wilco I have a bit more respect for, and can hear an influence of > Brian Wilson in. What about Weezer? Correct me if I'm wrong, but are Weezer the guys that did some quite raw sounding stuff a number of years back, recorded at home on 8-tracks etc? If so, I was impressed with their melodic sensibility. I preferred it to their newer stuff. They kinda conjured up the Ben Folds Five for me. Ben Folds, now there's a talented guy that writes some great songs. I hear Beatles and Beach Boys (and Billy) all over his stuff. I'm not going too far off topic am I?? Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 06 Jan 2004 19:00:20 -0800 From: Bryan Subject: Apple books Mark Frumento wrote: > Though it's old news to some "Those Were the Days" by Stefan > Granados (who also compiled the CD) is a great book about Apple. Absolutely wonderful book ...sad stories about Apple, though. I just received another book about Apple -- "The Longest Cocktail Party: An Insider's Diary of The Beatles, Their Million-Dollar 'Apple' Empire and Its Wild Rise and Fall" by Richard Dilello -- for Christmas. Any opinions on it? Bryan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 01:31:33 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Words and melodies Austin Roberts: > ........but I stand by my feeling that melody must catch and > hold the listener's attention in order for most songs to endure > the memory test. Rashkovsky replied: > What about Jobim's "One Note Samba"? Or "Subterranean Homesick Blues"? pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 10:26:36 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Brian Wilson's influence Diane wrote: > Now, here's my toss on Brian Wilson's influence: How about Todd > Rundgren? His very melodic songs, his great harmonies, his > arrangements, with separate "movements". I don't know if Todd has > ever acknowledged a debt to Brian, but I feel Brian's stamp on > Todd's writing. Anyone else see this? Todd cut a nice cover of "Good Vibrations" back in 1975-6 on his "Faithful" album. Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 03:10:44 -0800 (GMT-08:00) From: Chris Subject: What About Jon Hendricks? Mike Rashkow: > What about Jobim's "One Note Samba?" What, indeed? And what about too-little-acknowledged lyricist Jon Hendricks, who wrote the English words for "One Note Samba"? Hendricks is, among other things, a masterful lyricist. I fell in love with the Lambert, Hendricks & Ross "Sing A Song of Basie" at an early age, and one of the many reasons for loving that album was -- and is -- Hendricks' verbal gymnastics in those witty words he wrote for all the "instrumental" parts. That recent book "Reading Lyrics" (authors: Robert Kimball, Robert Gottlieb) is very much worth reading -- BUT one of my chief complaints is the absence of any Hendricks lyrics. Could have used some Dan Hicks and some Bob Dorough and some Leiber & Stoller, too. Chris -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 12:08:31 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: Brian Wilson/Todd Rundgren Diane wrote: > Now, here's my toss on Brian Wilson's influence: How about > Todd Rundgren? His very melodic songs, his great harmonies, > his arrangements, with separate "movements". I don't know > if Todd has ever acknowledged a debt to Brian, but I feel > Brian's stamp on Todd's writing. Anyone else see this? Absolutely! Todd's banks of vocal harmonies is pure Beach Boys. And his 1972 album 'Something Anything' is filled with nugget after nugget of 60s influenced gems. I really don't understand why this largely unsung album is sinfully overlooked and not included on the greatest albums lists. Peter. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 13:25:02 -0000 From: John Sellards Subject: Hello I've been lurking here for a while, and just wanted to say hello to all. I am both a graphic designer (I did the recent Skeeter Davis CD on Taragon, among many others for them) and a record hound (a mono collector, by the way) who is really enjoying the friendly communication and large amount of knowledge in this group. This is really rather like a big family reunion for a bunch of people who have never met, isn't it? John Sellards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 14:06:59 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Sally Go 'Round The Roses Carl asks: > Ok, was this the pressing or just bad mastering? "Sally Go Round > the Roses" by the Jaynetts. Tuff Records was right! How could a > song that sounded this bad on 45 ever make the top 10? I remember reading somewhere (Burt Bacharach column perhaps, or maybe even Walter Winchell, when the song was a hit) that there was an electronics problem with the audio board that recorded it. A burned- out capacitor or some such, that gave the song the fuzzy-buzz sound. Better equipment would probably have kept the song from becoming a hit! ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 20:07:25 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Shelley Fabares on CD Watson Macblue: > Incidentally, whatever happened to I Know That You'll Be There, > recorded by Shelley Fabares with The Fantastic Baggys? I've > been expecting to see it on CD sometime over the last few years, > but no show. Grumble. "I Know You'll Be There" by Shelley Fabares IS out on CD. It's track 26 (of 60) on "Chapel Of Love and other great girl group gems" (Castle Pulse PBXCD 353) - three CDs for less than 10 of our British pounds. Find her sitting prettily between Marcie Blane's "Bobby Did" and "Smart Boy" by Marilyn Britton. Now can I get back to my chicken korma please. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 10:42:33 -0500 From: Doc Subject: Re: Jan & Dean backup > I've never been able to find info of who the female vocal > partner is on Jan & Dean's rather strange tune "It's As Easy > As 1,2,3"...and even stranger than she has never been credited. Jill Gibson, who is a photographer who took Mama Michele's place in the Mamas and Papa's briefly. Also Jan's main squeeze for many years. Doc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 08:47:18 -0700 From: Rex Strother Subject: Melodies Rule - The Words Just "Go On" Rodney Rawlings: > Those who dispute the dominance of melody often say words and music > are equally important, and in a sense this is true. Bad lyrics can > kill the appeal and worth of a good tune (but perhaps not of a great > tune). But all their reasonings seem based on the premise that the > relation between the two elements is symmetrical. This is false. I think in current popular songwriting - it is the melody that is prominent. Of course, there are exceptions - but the hooks can keep nonsense or cliche lyrics popular as ever. If you doubt it - check out the lyric to "My Heart Will Go On" from TITANIC. Cliche, boring, and outright inept in places ("Love is when I loved you" - what the hell does that mean? "Distance and spaces between us" - both DISTANCE and SPACES?). The list goes "on and on" - I'm sure anyone on list could have done as well with a dictionary page tacked to a dart board. Here's a song that sailed strictly on Celine Dion's (and Kate Winslet's) lungs. Rex -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Wed, 07 Jan 2004 20:02:04 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: The Saddest Story Ever Told Simon: > All too technical for me. But what I do know - to my cost - is > that if you cue up a styrene 45 by winding it backwards it 'burns' > the record and ruins it. And I didn't know this until I did it on > a 45 I'd paid 160.00 for. And I don't want to talk about it. Sad to hear that story! Most turntables at Discos and Radio Stations have heavy tone arms with worn needles. I stay away from DJ promo copies of singles on E-bay for that reason. Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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