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Spectropop - Digest Number 1212



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Brian Wilson's last great song
           From: Chris 
      2. Orgone Box
           From: Jules Normington 
      3. Re: Stereo 45s
           From: Paul Urbahns 
      4. Re: Stackridge
           From: sarah vaughn 
      5. Re: (Why) Brackets?
           From: Orion 
      6. Re: Troggs / parens
           From: Phil Milstein 
      7. Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence
           From: Mike McKay 
      8. Left Banke mea culpa
           From: Mike McKay 
      9. Herd song / Bi question
           From: JD Doyle 
     10. Re: (Why) Brackets
           From: Richard Williams 
     11. Brian Wilson at the Rose Bowl, and lots of catching up
           From: Country Paul 
     12. Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence
           From: Eddy 
     13. Re: Good morning little school girl
           From: Denis Gagnon 
     14. Re: Brian Wilson's last great song
           From: Paul Bryant 
     15. Lambert-Potter productions
           From: Nick Archer 
     16. Macarthur Park
           From: Paul Bryant 
     17. Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence
           From: Peter Kearns 
     18. Austin Roberts & Bazooka
           From: Tony Waitekus 
     19. Re: Time to get a loan
           From: Mark Frumento 
     20. Re: Stackridge
           From: Mark Frumento 
     21. The Hangmen's "What A Girl Can't Do"
           From: Bill George 
     22. Re:  Bi question
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     23. Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence / Come and Get it Lead Vocal
           From: Mark Frumento 
     24. Happy Birthday, Julie
           From: Country Paul 
     25. Re: Stalker Rock
           From: Bob Hanes 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 15:43:34 -0800 (PST) From: Chris Subject: Brian Wilson's last great song Question for Paul Bryant (mostly): Just out of curiosity, what do you think is the last Brian Wilson composition -- i.e., the most chronologically recent one -- worth listening to? Chris -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 11:29:53 +1100 From: Jules Normington Subject: Orgone Box Now, I've been reading these High Llamas posts with great interest as I admire them immensely...but I'd like to throw another hat into the ring (that's the legends-as-an-influence ring)...and this, by the way, is a hat that will fit MANY of you on this list. That hat belongs to The Orgone Box... If you don't know them, if you were to find a copy of their self-titled CD, you'd be blessed by a stunning album full of the most beautiful melodies, utterly gorgeous production (think George Martin, Phil Spector, Brian Wilson) providing a huge full sound, and an ever-present touch of psychedelia (think British pop-psych 1967 era). It's the melodies that over-ride everything else though. The Orgone Box is Rick Corcoran...and you could be excused for thinking he grew up on an exclusive diet the Beatles and the Beach Boys...it's engendered some amazing reviews, viz: ≥Glorious, pulsing psych-drenched power pop of the highest order; lyrically intelligent and driven by joyous energy and majestic melodies with more hooks than a lifetime subscription of Angler's weekly.≤ - Mick Dillingham from an interview with Rick in Bucketful of Brains #58 ≥...the CD is psychedelic as hell. It's also poppier 'n hell, with its big, lush waves of sound, irresistible hooks, and rolling harmonies...In fact, with his heliumated Lennonesque vocals, this may be the best marriage of pop and psych since 'Strawberry Fields Forever'.≤ - Toast Magazine ≥Above parody, beyond revival, Corcoran knew, and maybe still does, exactly what made the Beatles chord-progressions and lysergic- world special. And it shows! Well worth investigating!!≤ - Record Collector. ≥The results are absolutely mind-blowing when everything clicks, as it does on just about every track...Easily a contender for album of the year, I'd say.≤ - Goldmine ≥The collective result resembles a fantastic Baroque pop construct of Sgt. Pepper-y proportions, the kind of record that headphones were invented for.≤ - All Music Guide I hope a lot of you already know this album...but if not, boy have you got a treat awaiting. (It's on Minus Zero Records in the UK.) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:34:53 EST From: Paul Urbahns Subject: Re: Stereo 45s Mike Callahan explained stereo 45s in one of his articles. The first stereo 45s were issued in the 50s with the first stereo albums. But the juke boxes were made for mono and few rcord buyers purchased them. So the companies went back to mono for singles. Then juke box companies covered to stereo but by the time they were in most locations they were filled with mono 45s. The 6 song stereo EPs (short versions of albums) were manufactured strictly for the juke box trade and was generally in stereo. The first all stereo 45 label I know of is the Hit Records sound- a-like label in Nashville that was pressing everything from January 1964 on in stereo. The singles were mastered by Columbia's Nashville Studio in Compatible which became the industry standard for a short while when Clive Davis eliminated mono Lps in the late 60s. Those Columbia Lps saying something to the effect also plays in mono were Compatible materings originally. Many Mercury albums which play stereo in mono sleeves are actually Compatible pressings and have both release numbers etched in the groves. My Mystic Moods "More Than Music" though in a mono sleeve is actually compatible mastered and plays stereo. For those who missed our earlier discussions a Compatible mastered album has the bass (frequencies below 500 cycles) in mono. Therefore they can be tracked by a mono needle which was not as sharp (had a bigger needle) than stereo needles. I have some Compatible stereo Atlantic 45s that were made from Mono tapes so they would track better on stereo turnatables. Paul Urbahns -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 17:40:34 -0800 (PST) From: sarah vaughn Subject: Re: Stackridge Mark Frumento wrote: > Stackridge released an amazing and yet totally unnoticed "reunion" > LP in 1999 called "Something for the Weekend." It's full of the > same melodic tendencies as their 1970s releases. James Warren, who > was probably the main proponent of their Beatles/Beach Boys sound, > was also in the 70s band Korgis... yet another example of a band > updating 60s sounds. I had no idea about this album. I'll have to check this out! I love the first two albums, and that's all I've ever heard from them. I've been lurking around for a while and never posted anything so it seems like it's approriate for my first post to be to thank you for informing me of this. First thing I must do is see who produced it, and if there's any songs about giant vegetables or hedgehogs on it. Happy new year everyone! Sarah 1969 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 20:58:37 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: (Why) Brackets? Gary Spector wrote: > As for the best answer (so far), I think Glenn has the answer that > makes the most sence (to me). I agree Gary except how do you explain songs that were written long before radio was around that carried the ( )? To me it is not something we will know for sure, but I will go along with Glenn's theory, at least since the production of records and the billboard/ Cashbox Hot 100, etc. Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 22:33:23 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Troggs / parens Artie Wayne wrote: > ......so 15 minutes before they were due to arrive, I picked up my > guitar and wrote "Somewhere my Girl is Waiting". Larry loved it > and recorded it a few weeks later. Although it was banned in the > UK [for being too suggestive] and never released in the U.S. it > gave me an open door to Larry from then on. Fantastic song! Although, with all due respect (and quite jokingly), it seems it was harder to get a cut on The Troggs that WASN'T banned than one that was! Speaking of Page's boys, does anyone know why the excellent "Troggs Archaeology" 2-CD set (which includes Artie's "Somewhere My Girl Is Waiting") was pulled off the market so quickly after its release in 1992? I mean, ya sneezed and ya missed it, and no store I tried could get it back in again. While I'm at it, here's a great lyric couplet, from I Can't Control Myself: You fill me so with this big temptation This kind of feeling could move a nation Richard Williams wrote: > During the sessions for "Happy Xmas (War Is Over)", John Lennon > pointed out the brackets in the song's title and said it was one > of those pop-music habits that he liked a lot. Good story. One of Richard Hell's song titles read, "(I Could Live With You) (In) Another World." Which was reduced to just "Another World" for the album version. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 00:20:29 -0500 From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence I wrote: > Badfinger had the last of their four major Top 40 hits, all of > which were very Beatles-sounding, in 1972. Peter Kearns replied: > This would fall in a slightly different category I would think. > I'm not convinced of how overtly Beatle-sounding Badfinger were. > Again, it's that 'influence' thing. The literal involvement of > McCartney/Harrison unavoidably gave them a Beatle 'bent' as it > were... Well, as Paul McCartney instructed Badfinger to virtually duplicate his demo of "Come and Get It" down to the smallest detail (assuring them that it would become a hit if they listened -- they did and it did), I think you'd have to stretch to say it's not Beatles-sounding. And I can't be the only one who hears similarities in Pete Ham's and Paul's voice (the irony was that it was Joey Moelland who looked so much like Paul!). Then as you allude to later, you have things such as the slide solo on "Day After Day" (played by Pete Ham and doubled by George Harrison, who produced the track). > and may well have been a double-edged sword when you consider > that Badfinger in a way were tainted by the Beatle presence and > could very well have flourished without them (and indeed had > already existed as the Iveys) in a way that someone like Mary > Hopkin could not. It's hard to say to what extent they were "tainted" by the association with The Beatles, but the reality is that the association was entirely limited to "Come and Get It" and the handful of tracks Harrison produced. There was no involvement whatsoever between them beyond this (despite their residence on the Apple label). Believe me, I love Badfinger, and wouldn't think of taking away from their accomplishments by labelling them as unduly influenced by The Beatles. The influence, I think, was unavoidable -- and in my personal view, when Badfinger tried to be a more traditional "heavy" group, leaving behind the virtues of melody, harmony, and songs with hooks, they were far less interesting. And let's remember that the original statement I was responding to was that having a sound with Beatles touches was an impediment to commercial success in the early 70s. I believe the examples I cited show this wasn't entirely the case. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 00:37:38 -0500 From: Mike McKay Subject: Left Banke mea culpa Thanks to those who pointed out my error in crediting Tom Feher with the lead vocal on "Ivy, Ivy" and "And Suddenly." I know better, and I should have been more careful. My apologies. Small consolation, but it's nice to know the big guys can screw up too. I happened to be thumbing through Dave Marsh's "The Heart of Rock and Soul" earlier today, and in his "Give Him a Great Big Kiss" entry, he calls Mary Ann Ganser the lead singer of the Shangri-las and makes Mary and Betty Weiss the "brunette twins" backing her up!! This only reinforces my belief that Marsh must have been a real geek growing up. Given what Mary Weiss did (and still does) to me both vocally and, er, "hormonally" -- well, I damn sure knew which one she was! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 05:45:36 -0000 From: JD Doyle Subject: Herd song / Bi question Hi, Can someone give me info about the song "Something Strange" by The Herd? I've read that its lyrics have bisexual or gay context to them. Can someone verify that to me, or, better yet, tell me how I can hear the track. The reason I want it is I'm doing research for a radio show. I produce a monthly show out of Houston called Queer Music Heritage. I think my February show will be on bisexuality in music...not bisexual artists, but songs actually lyrically about that. There are numerous recent songs to be found, but I'm having trouble finding many "older" ones. Surely folks didn't just start singing about this in the 90s. Any song ideas would be much appreciated. I don't know that anyone has tried to do a show on this, so I want to make it as good as possible. Thanks, JD Doyle http://www.queermusicheritage.com qmheritage@aol.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 09:27:32 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re: (Why) Brackets Come to think of it, the greatest parenthesized song title of all time must be Bacharach and David's "(Here I Go Again) Looking With My Eyes (Seeing With My Heart)", a wonderful 1965 single for Dionne Warwick. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 01:52:43 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Brian Wilson at the Rose Bowl, and lots of catching up Happy New Year to all - may 2004 be a year of health, happiness, peace, prosperity, satisfaction, good music, and all the items on your want list being found in mint condition on the original label for waaaay below market value! New Year's News: Today's Tournament of Roses Parade features Brian Wilson (the real one) and his wife (also real) riding in a '47 Ford woodie (not a real car, but a beautifully designed float in flowers). Poor Brian looked a little wooden, but you can't help think he was having at least a little bit of fun, fun, fun. Back to catching up: Steve Crump, re: Mina: > Il Cielo In Una Stanza was released in the USA on the Time label > and made the charts 1961. The label lists the song as "This World > We Love In", but is the Italian language version. ...and it was a small hit in the US; it's the only record of hers I knew of before the discussion here. Martin Roberts: > The featured song on Al Hazan's page is another obscure 60s female > vocalist: Lee-Anne with the self-composed "Never" on Ann records: > http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/ahjnrotw.htm Well, the first 8 seconds sound great; the rest won't play for me. Any tips, please? Mark T: > I don't really think there is much recorded in the last 25 or so > years that I would constitute as being good....I learned in a > sociology class in high school that matters of taste can never be > argued. Then I won't argue, just differ in my opinion that there has been lots of really good stuff; most of it just doesn't show up on commercial radio. But check any site that distributes music and has reasonably-sized samples, such as www.cdbaby.com, and you'll find dozens of new and recent albums worth owning, many by artist-owned companies, with quite a few paying homage to "our" genres. As a starting point, I'd commend you to my friend Alice Bierhorst's "Oxygen," found there or at her own website: http://www.alicebierhorst.com And on a more mainstream note, find 1993's superb debut album by October Project (Epic), with the remarkably distinctive lead voice of Mary Fahl and some of the best writing and vocal interplay of the 1990's. Not a clinker in the bunch. If you like great orchestrated pop, beautiful melodies, and a nod to Fairport Convention, find this CD; you won't regret it. Peggy Lee's name came up, and I was wondering if "Sing A Rainbow," from the original Disney movie "Lady & The Tramp," originally on a Decca 45, was available anywhere on a CD? (My 45 plays like Rice Krispies!) Will Stos: > I just stumbled across a site called http://the.soulclub.org which > has hundreds of really hard-to-find tunes available for your > listening pleasure. Indeed - but two notes: (1) the files have the extension ".ram" which I haven't encountered before; and (2) artists are filed by first name or, in the case of groups starting with "The..." under the letter T. But yes, Will, what a find! Now, if you've never heard it, go to "T" and check out The Dontells' "In Your Heart You Know I'm Right" (VeeJay, 1964). Musical question of this post: what is the original inspiration for this title? And answering an earlier question, Jim Cassidy and TD correctly identified "Mmm-dap, mmm-dap, mmm-wa-wa-wa" as "Baby Talk" by Jan & Dean. Congratulations - your diploma from the College of Musical Knowledge is lost in the mail somewhere! :-) Literature Dept.: C. Ponti: > For those who feel, as I do, that the business aspects of the music > industry are indisputably wed with the artistic, I would recommend > reading HITMEN by Dannen and another book, OFF THE CHARTS. And for a nuts-and-bolts guide to navigating the industry's treacherous shoals, I suggest "Confessions of a Record Producer" by "Moses Avalon," an admitted nom-de-plume. He offers a step-by-step how-to, including the categories of people who have to be "stroked," etc. No names are given, but it's a handy tool if you want to either crash the majors or start your own artist-based label. Barnes & Noble stocks it in the US. Justin McDevitt: > It's good to see some postings on this group regarding Ruby and The > Romantics. My favorite song by this wonderful harmony group is When > You're Young And In Love. May I throw in a nod to my personal fave, the doo-wop inspired "Moonlight and Memories." Mike McKay re: Godfrey Daniel; > ...The thing of it is, the singing and the arrangements are > EXCELLENT -- and outside of a component of humor that seems > naturally occurring in doo wop music, they're played perfectly > straight. That is, there's no element of exaggerated parody > such as you find with Sha-Na-Na. These guys were serious about > what they were doing....[D]oes anyone know more about this > thoroughly enjoyable album? Wish I did, Mike; we used to play them occasionally at WHCN (a progressive rock station). They may have been the best neo-doo-wop act until Little Isidore & The Inquisitors came along - and LI&theI's played live! LI's CD's are also excellent: http://www.littleisidore.com has more info. For a good review of this now-disbanded group's live show, click on "Isidorian Historian" and then "Third Wave." (I heard a third-hand rumor that they might reform; hope it's true.) Mark Frumento: > Another interesting little LP from Bosstown is Chamaeleon Church. > The band's main distinction was that Chevy Chase ranked among its > members (don't laugh, he's actually quite good and even > contributes a credible pop vocal on one song). I would never > compare CC to Orpheus but the LP has a nice baroque pop sound with > fairly accomplished songs. The beautiful "Camelia Is Changing" from that album is, in my opinion, the lead track. Well worth finding, either 45 or LP version. Incidentally, although based in Boston (with Mr. Chase being from Pawtucket, RI) and on MGM, they were not marketed as part of the Bosstown Sound hype, despite the Chevy Chase narrative quoted by Tom about this group posing as Orpheus. Scott Swanson: > I do know of 4 Wilbury-related Del Shannon recordings, though: > 1. Hot Love (with Lynne, Petty & Harrison) > 2. Lost In A Memory (with Lynne & Petty) > 3. I Got You (The Bird's Song) (with Lynne & Petty) > 4. Walk Away (with Lynne & Petty) Where are these available, please? Peter Kearns: > In that case, since we're on the topic of Beatle covers, here's > one I did of Across The Universe recently. See what you think: > http://www.peterkearns.net/listen.htm Nice re-conception, Peter; will listen to more at your site when I'm more awake. Ah, to slumber, perchance to dream, Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:43:18 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence Mike McKay: > It's hard to say to what extent they were "tainted" by the > association with The Beatles, but the reality is that the > association was entirely limited to "Come and Get It" and the > handful of tracks Harrison produced. There was no involvement > whatsoever between them beyond this (despite their residence > on the Apple label). Mike, Although you're absolutely correct in your statement, I think you're underestimating the influence of "just being on Apple" was at the time. I remember buying several records just because they were on Apple. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 07:30:19 -0500 From: Denis Gagnon Subject: Re: Good morning little school girl Perhaps because it sounded more rock n' roll than bluesy, my favorite version of this song was recorded by a relatively unknown British group (at least on this side of the pond), Ian & the Zodiacs. Denis Gagnon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 04:31:54 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Brian Wilson's last great song Chris wrote: > Question for Paul Bryant (mostly): Just out of curiosity, what > do you think is the last Brian Wilson composition -- i.e., the > most chronologically recent one -- worth listening to? Two answers - a gorgeous sad ballad called She Says that She Needs Me released on the last BW solo album "Imagination" in 1998. However I discovered that that song was composed in the mid-60s. So the real answer is "Water Builds Up" which is absolutely wonderful - it's just a pop song, not a masterpiece like God only Knows or Cabinessence, but it's just great - and alas yet to be officially released as it's on Sweet Insanity & therefore dates to around 1992 I think. Sweet Insanity is I think still unreleased because it's mired in some Eugene Landy legal morass. (Remember the joke bootleg title for some unreleased Beach Boys material - "Landylocked"!) If you're trying to get me to say that Brian hasn't written many good songs lately, then yes, it's very true. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 06:33:07 -0600 From: Nick Archer Subject: Lambert-Potter productions As long as we're in the Lambert-Potter mode, I have two singles that I'd love to get more information about. One is "This Heart" by Gene Redding on Haven Records, and the other is "If That's The Way You Want It" by Diamond Head on Dunhill. Both are written by and produced by Lambert-Potter. Does anyone know the story of these records? Also, how about Chris Hodge's "I'm On My Way"? A record with a unique sound. Nick Archer Nashville TN -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 04:40:25 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Macarthur Park Dear Poppers, I found a "Top 100 Worst Songs Ever" list on some web page or other, and I confess I was surprised to see that beating all the usual dreck like "Agadoo" or "Long haired Lover from Liverpool" to the No 1 position was, yes, Jimmy Webb's 7 minute epic from 1968, as sung by Richard Harris. As for me, it's actually one of my all time favourite 60s records, and I was always disappointed that Jimmy Webb's later stuff never came anywhere near it. But now I'm wondering - whaat do Spectropoppers think of this record? Am I the only person who still plays it for pleasure? Does it now make people cringe and run away? "Between the parted pages and were pressed In love's hot, fevered iron Like a striped pair of pants" - makes perfect sense to me! pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 13:49:40 -0000 From: Peter Kearns Subject: Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence Mike McKay wrote: > Well, as Paul McCartney instructed Badfinger to virtually duplicate > his demo of "Come and Get It" down to the smallest detail (assuring > them that it would become a hit if they listened -- they did and it > did), I think you'd have to stretch to say it's not Beatles- > sounding. That's what I mean. I may not have been clear. The "Come And Get It" duplication stripped them, in that instance, of their personality which otherwise would've been more unique; as indeed it was on the other three tracks; Harrison's contribution notwithstanding. > It's hard to say to what extent they were "tainted" by the > association with The Beatles. To the extent of "Come And Get It" I would think. But hey! You can't argue with success right? :-) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 07:08:25 -0800 From: Tony Waitekus Subject: Austin Roberts & Bazooka Hey Austin, Last week I was in a record store in Plainfield, IL (near Chicago) that is going out of business and is selling everything they have, including shelves of records in their basement. As I was going through the basement stacks, I can across about 20 copies of "Boo On You" by Bazooka on Bang records. You're listed as the writer, and after listening to it, I think you may also be "Bazooka". Are you? Cool fun record. Tony Waitekus Davenport, IA -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 15:28:32 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Time to get a loan Jeff Lemlich wrote: > I was waiting for some loan company to rewrite "Alone" by Heart > as... (drumroll)... "how do I get you a loan"... Or The Beach Boys'... "Time to Get Alone" "time to get a loan ...." -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 15:39:43 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Stackridge sarah vaughn wrote: > First thing I must do is see who produced it, and if there's > any songs about giant vegetables or hedgehogs on it. No but there are songs about Vegans, Wildebeestes, drinking and driving and grooving along on the highway on a Monday morning once! "Something for the Weekend" is a wonderful record but it is mostly a James Warren produced affair. I happen to like his pop sensibilities (mostly influenced by Brian Wilson and the Beatles) but maybe not quite as quirky as the first few LPs. For the most part though it's so strangely sounds like the band recorded it in the early 70s. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 10:56:32 EST From: Bill George Subject: The Hangmen's "What A Girl Can't Do" Can this be played to musica? Sounds great! Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 16:06:49 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Bi question JD Doyle : > I think my February show will be on bisexuality in music...not > bisexual artists, but songs actually lyrically about that. There > are numerous recent songs to be found, but I'm having trouble > finding many "older" ones. Surely folks didn't just start singing > about this in the 90s. Any song ideas would be much appreciated. JD, The first song that comes to mind is "Another Love" by Stories on Kama Sutra. I'm not sure if it's been reissued. Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 16:06:22 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Badfinger / Beatles influence / Come and Get it Lead Vocal Mike McKay wrote: > And I can't be the only one who hears similarities in Pete Ham's > and Paul's voice (the irony was that it was Joey Moelland who > looked so much like Paul!). You may be alone in this as Tom Evans sang the lead on "Come and Get It." Tom definitely sounded a bit like McCartney as evidenced on his other vocals like "Maybe Tomorrow." Aside from this though Pete Ham sounds nothing like McCarntey to me. His voice is way too low. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:29:00 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Happy Birthday, Julie Relating to recent discussions, today (January 2nd) is Julius Larosa's birthday (born 1930). Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Fri, 02 Jan 2004 09:52:53 -0800 (PST) From: Bob Hanes Subject: Re: Stalker Rock The #1 candidate for inclusion in this genre would have to be Brian Wilson's -(unrelease) Lazy Lizzie! What an incredibly creepy song! But, sorta funny in that naive BW sort of way. Have y'all heard it? The Right Reverend Bob, dumb angel chapel, Church of the Harmonic Overdub -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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