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Spectropop - Digest Number 1198



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Today in history
           From: Country Paul 
      2. Re: Michael Brown
           From: Scott 
      3. Re: Peter Gallway
           From: C. Ponti 
      4. Re: Michael Brown / All This & WWII / Sgt Pepper Movie
           From: Jon Cook 
      5. Re: Debbie Campbell / Jimmie Cross / All This & WWII
           From: ACJ 
      6. Re: Gilbert O'Sullivan
           From: Albabe Gordon 
      7. Re: "uptight"
           From: Bill Craig 
      8. Re: Nina Simone question
           From: Steve Harvey 
      9. Re: I'll Be Back
           From: Justin McDevitt 
     10. Re: Patsy Cline
           From: Phil Milstein 
     11. Re: Michael Brown / The Cherry People
           From: Justin McDevitt 
     12. Re: US chart question
           From: Austin Powell 
     13. Re: Nina Simone - Peaches
           From: Dee 
     14. Re: Nina Simone question
           From: Simon White 
     15. Re: Nina Simone - Peaches
           From: Paul Bryant 
     16. Re: Tootie & the Bouquets
           From: Mick Patrick 
     17. Re: Beatles covers/"uptight"/Sixties geniuses/Harry Lookofsky
           From: Richard Williams 
     18. Ricky Ticky Ta Ta Ta, Johnny Cymbal, Jerome Brothers
           From: Martin Roberts 
     19. Re: Ed Cobb
           From: Tony Baylis 
     20. Re: Early 45s
           From: steveo 
     21. Re: Bobby Vee
           From: Bob 
     22. Re: Manhattans - Kiss And Say Goodbye
           From: beegleaw23185 
     23. Jerry Fuller
           From: steveo 
     24. Re: Lloyd Price and Harold Logan
           From: steveo 
     25. All This and World War II
           From: Watson Macblue 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 15:57:04 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Today in history 1963 Beatles release "I Want To Hold Your Hand"/"I Saw Her Standing There" 1964 Beatles' "I Feel Fine" single goes #1 & stays #1 for 3 weeks 1965 Paul McCartney is interviewed on pirate radio station Radio Caroline 1965 Barbra Streisand closes in "Funny Girl" on Broadway 1967 The BBC broadcasts "The Magical Mystery Tour" 1967 Dave Brubeck Quartet formally disbands 1968 Led Zeppelin's concert debut in Boston as opener for Vanilla Fudge Just keeping things in perspective, Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 16:53:56 EST From: Scott Subject: Re: Michael Brown > attempted Left Banke reunion...which like several others ended > in acrimony between Brown and Martin. So what's the source of their ongoing dislike for one another ??? Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 23:30:35 -0000 From: C. Ponti Subject: Re: Peter Gallway Me; > And you know that Gary Bonner got his start playing at the > Night Owl as part of The Magicians? They used to open for the > Spoonful, as did the Strangers with Kenny Altman and Peter Galway. David Heasman: > Ah, Peter Gallway. Made 3 good records as "Fifth Avenue Band", > "Ohio Knox" and himself. What happened to him I wonder. Peter has albums out in Japan on the Dreamsville label. He has a hardcore following, of which I am one. He is gifted writer and a fantastic and loyal friend! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 21:43:30 EST From: Jon Cook Subject: Re: Michael Brown / All This & WWII / Sgt Pepper Movie First, thanks very much to the Michael Brown info. I was surprised to read about the 2001 sessions. Everything I had heard had painted him as a voluntary shut-in with no interest in music. Nice to hear he's still active. On a semi-related note to "All This and World War II" - did I imagine this or is the 'Sgt Pepper' movie actually out on DVD now? Anybody else read that MOJO article on the making of this movie. Incredible story, especially the confidence everybody had in it... until it got into the theaters. But, I'll say this - the 'failures' from past years are much more interesting than today's (ie Justin Loves Kelly, or whatever that American Idol movie was called). Happy Holidays jon cook -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 23:07:40 -0500 (EST) From: ACJ Subject: Re: Debbie Campbell / Jimmie Cross / All This & WWII Mark T: Debbie Campbell had a minor US hit in the mid-1970s with "Please Tell Him I Said Hello" (previously a British hit for Dana). Do you perchance know if she's also the Debbie Dawn who recorded a bizarre country single called "Hands" that wound up on Rhino's "World's Worst Records Volume 2"? Country Paul: Jimmie Cross's "other" single, "Hey Little Girl," was released on the Charly 4-CD set "The Red Bird Story", but not since (that I know of). All This and World War II: If I remember right, this film actually started as a dream (literally) of a film executive; in the dream he saw old newsreel footage of WWII while hearing Beatles songs, and upon waking, realized that his generation was (a) the last to be directly affected by WWII and (b) the first to be directly affected by the Beatles. ACJ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 20:08:36 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: Re: Gilbert O'Sullivan Stuart Miller said: > Well, my claim to knowing what it was about was because he was > telling the world about it in endless interviews when the record > was released. Hey Stuart sir. My comment was in regards to the people that thought the song was about pedophilia... of which I completely defended Mr. O'Sullivan. It may have been about whatsisname's daughter, but was it "impure?" More Stuart: > I'm not entirely sure (being British and therefore culturally > constipated) whether you're being serious or not here. I strongly > suspect you are not, but just on the off chance that you are, then > I have to rush to the defense of an artist I thought was one of > the most boring and dullest performers ever to emerge from anywhere. I'm assuming I'm the constipated one here, Stuart. You're "defending" an artist you thought was "...the most boring and dullest performers ever to emerge from anywhere?" Anyway. I like a lot of O'Sullivan's stuff. ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 04:22:44 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: "uptight" Bill Craig: > "Oh you know it isn't right to put yourself uptight > By thinkin about the things he's done before" > Obviously used in the negative sense. David Heasman: > Likewise "I'm not lookin' to uptighten you" from "All I really > Want to Do" 1964. Dave, I was going to include this in my post also but according to the Dylan lyrics the line is: I'm not looking to fight with you, frighten you or tighten you" But it sure did sound like The Byrds sang it as "uptighten", which would work actually better than Dylan's original. Bill Craig -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 21:20:58 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Nina Simone question Paul Bryant wrote: > Nina screams out "what do they call me? My name is PEACHES!!!" > So - what's the significance of the name Peaches?? To my > (British) ears it sounds very strange, but I kind of think I'm > missing something Americans would understand straight away... Actually Paul, being an American Nina fan doesn't help anymore than being a Brit one. I always thought she picked the name as a kind of joke. Not exactly the type of character you'd think would go by the name Peaches considering how rough Nina made her out to be. However, it could be along the lines of A Boy Named Sue. The name is the reason for all that rage. Always loved Nina's cover of "Don't Pay Them Any Mind", "The Man With the Horn" and "This Is All I Ask". -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 23:27:29 -0700 From: Justin McDevitt Subject: Re: I'll Be Back ACJ asked: > Speaking of non-copycat Beatles covers: did anyone do their "I'll > Be Back" in waltz time, the way John & Paul originally wrote it? > I heard the Beatles' waltz version on "Anthology 2" and thought > it was lots better than the released version. ACJ, I don't imagine that another group recorded the waltz version of this track. However, in 1968, my cousin Frank who had just completed boot camp with the Marine Corp at the infamous Paris Island training facility sent me a compilation Lp which among its tracks included The Moby Grape's 805, as well as the Buckinghams singing I'll Be Back. Justin McDevitt -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 00:33:52 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Patsy Cline Phil Hall wrote: > This tune may be slightly off-subject, but in the mid-1950's > I had 2 uncles who were country artists with their own weekly > radio show in Huntsville, Alabama. For those who don't remember, > it was a different world back then; a world where Elvis Presley > could just hop off a bus at the end of a tour and walk home. > Anyway, they knew a few lesser Nashville stars and had picked > up a demo 45 by Patsy Cline called "If You Don't Believe I'm > Leaving, Just Count The Days I'm Gone". I'm almost positive it > was on the black Mercury label. I later found out that it was > a cover of an Eddie Marshall tune. > I'd love to get my hands on a copy of it, but the president of > the Patsy Cline Fan Club assures me that Patsy never recorded > such a song, and claimed to have verification from Patsy's > husband as well. I KNOW she recorded the song; it just may not > have been released. One of my uncles also distinctly remembers > the record, although he has no idea what happened to his copy of > it. > Does anyone have or remember this song? I sure don't, but Margaret Jones's bio of Patsy offers a few clues that help me arrive at one possible scenario. Back in Virginia, before her success, Cline cut a number of songwriter demos at one or more of the local studios. According to Jones, after the success of "Walking After Midnight" (or perhaps it was after her death, I can't recall) some of those recordings were spirited out of one of those studios by Cline's husband Charlie Dick, their contents never to publicly surface. The possibility that "If You Don't Believe ..." might've been among them would depend on Dick's verification having been in error (either inadvertently or willfully); on Cline's version of the song having been a songwriter demo rather than a cover; and on that demo having somehow made its way into your uncles' hands, and then back out again. All a bit far-fetched, I'll admit, but perhaps not entirely out of the question. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2003 23:48:17 -0700 From: Justin McDevitt Subject: Re: Michael Brown / The Cherry People Austin Roberts asked: > Was Mike Brown involved with the Cherry People? Austin, I don't know if Mike Brown was involved with the Cherry People. I have an Lp by this group from 1968 and can take a look. For clarification, are you referring to the same Cherry People some or all of whose members were also members of The Hangmen, a Washington D.C. area based group from 1965-66? Justin McDevitt -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 08:39:48 -0000 From: Austin Powell Subject: Re: US chart question PB wrote: > in the UK, because in the 1950s and for most of the 1960s there > was only one state monopoly broadcaster, the BBC, there was no > such thing as a Most Played on Radio chart, and I believe there > was never a Most Jukebox Plays chart either. There was a "juke box plays" chart for many years in the UK...It was printed weekly in a newspaper called "World's Fair" which was aimed at juke box operators, funfair operators and the like.... Whilst many of the music papers were still only printing Top 40s, "World's Fair" printed a Top 100..... (The far, far less talented) Austin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 01:40:29 -0800 (PST) From: Dee Subject: Re: Nina Simone - Peaches > My name is PEACHES!!!" So - what's the significance of the name > Peaches?? To my (British) ears it sounds very strange, but I kind > of think I'm missing something Americans would understand straight > away... Believe it or not, I used to wonder the same thing (though I'm American), and just four or so years ago I had the chance-of-a- lifetime conversation with Dr. Simone and actually asked her this very question . . . after discussing my admiration for the song at ample length to sway her into thinking I wasn't a total idiot. Her reply was, "Honey, does Peaches sound like a killer's name to you? They MADE her angry, she wasn't BORN like that!" So "Peaches" was just meant to convey that this character was once as full of sweetness and light as any child. Dee -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 10:04:29 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Nina Simone question Paul Bryant wrote: > So - what's the significance of the name Peaches?? To my (British) > ears it sounds very strange, but I kind of think I'm missing > something Americans would understand straight away... Interesting question. Jackie Wilson shouts out the name on his "Whispers Getting Louder" too. Simon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 05:00:15 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Nina Simone - Peaches I asked: > ... "...My name is PEACHES!!!" So - what's the significance of the > name Peaches?? To my (British) ears it sounds very strange, but I > kind of think I'm missing something Americans would understand > straight away... Dee: > Believe it or not, I used to wonder the same thing (though I'm > American), and just four or so years ago I had the chance-of-a- > lifetime conversation with Dr. Simone and actually asked her this > very question . . . after discussing my admiration for the song at > ample length to sway her into thinking I wasn't a total idiot. > > Her reply was, "Honey, does Peaches sound like a killer's name to > you? They MADE her angry, she wasn't BORN like that!" > > So "Peaches" was just meant to convey that this character was once > as full of sweetness and light as any child. Man alive, Spectropop rules! Talk about straight from the horse's mouth! Many many thanks - not often we get definitive answers to our questions! pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 14:18:38 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Tootie & the Bouquets Jimmy Crescitelli: > I listened (in my car!) to Touch the Wall of Sound, Volume 2, > which contains the aforementioned group's "The Conqueror". I > read about them on Will Stos' fabulous girl groups site, but... > does anyone think the lead sounds like Little Eva? Could Tootie > & her Bouquets be Eva and the Cookies? The phrasing, > pronunciation... that sounds like Eva to me. How right you are! It does sound remarkably like not only Little Eva but also the Cookies. I've posted the track to musica: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ What does anyone else think? Little Eva? Or Memorex? Alas, Eva is dead, so we can't ask her. Maybe John Clemente could ask one or other of the Cookies for us? All you short guys be sure to listen, this one's for you. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 14:59:13 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re: Beatles covers/"uptight"/Sixties geniuses/Harry Lookofsky 1. Late entries for great Beatles covers: Roy Redmond's "Good Day Sunshine", J.J.Barnes' "Day Tripper" and two versions of "I've Just Seen a Face", by the Dillards and Holly Cole. 2. Interesting comments on "uptight". The question now puzzling amateurs lexicographers must be, how and why did it reverse its original (negative) meaning so briefly (circa '66, cf Stevie Wonder and Andy Warhol) before reverting? 3. I second Paul Bryant's defence of Bob Dylan's performances of his own songs without reservation, but I question his selection of Lennon, McCartney, Dylan and Wilson as the four geniuses of Sixties music. Was there no black writer or performer fit to be considered their equal? Not Smokey Robinson, Curtis Mayfield or James Brown? If you listen to the music that's around today, Brown had as much influence as anyone, with the possible exception of Dylan. And personally, much as I loved the Beatles, I'd put Holland-Dozier- Holland up there with Lennon and McCartney. 4. Harry Lookofksy (the father of the Left Banke's Michael Brown) is a familiar name from Sixties and Seventies album covers, but I bet he never did a better day's work than his solo on Gil Evans's "Zee Zee", from the album Where Flamingos Fly (A&M, 1981). The tune is a sort of blues based on a Basque dance in 5/4, and Lookofsky plays a tenor violin, apparently tuned an octave lower than the regular model. And a happy new year to all those members whose erudition and enthusiasm keeps introducing me (and no doubt many others) to wonderful stuff I'd somehow missed. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 15:20:02 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Ricky Ticky Ta Ta Ta, Johnny Cymbal, Jerome Brothers Hello Austin, I have your second 45 on Philips, "Ricky Ticky Ta Ta Ta". It's what I'd describe as a bright, breezy and bouncy piece of late 60s pop, very popular with many of the 'poppers on the site. It's not just the "shanga lang" chorus that puts me in mind of the early Bay City Rollers and Rubettes, I wonder if they were listening?! Playing now at musica to let the people decide: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ You're credited as writer of both sides, how did your connection with the Jeromes come about? Did you turn up at their door with sheaves of songs and say, "Go on, make me a star", or did they spot you? And what was it like working with them? The site really does have some incredibly knowledgeable people on it but the input from folk such as yourself, Mike, Alan, Artie, Al, James, Carol etc etc who actually made the records is a major factor in Spectropop being so special. Thanks for sharing your comments on Johnny Cymbal, good to hear of his sense of humour. There can't be many who hear Mr. Bassman without a grin on their face. Martin (The other Mr.) Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 15:44:25 -0000 From: Tony Baylis Subject: Re: Ed Cobb I feel it most important that we should never forget that Ed Cobb, along with Lincoln Mayorga, gave us the Piltdown Men. Great instrumentals even if they did come along as instrumentals were falling out of favour. Brontosaurus Stomp, MacDonald's Cave, Piltdown Rides Again and the Great Imposter still provide much pleasure fourty years (Ouch!) after their release ... Tony Baylis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 08:06:06 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Re: Early 45s Bill Craig wrote: > Here's a few recollections and questions about 45 releases in > the late '50s and early '60s. What were the contributing factors > to whether a record was released with a picture sleeve or without > one? Was it all a function of the budget alloted for the paticular > record? Did all 45's put out by major labels have a picture sleeve > put together for it and some retail outlets got these while other > stores were shipped the records in plain paper sleeves? Were there > some small labels that never put out picture sleeves because they > just couldn't afford them? Also I remember a time when some > supermarket chains sold 45s (I'm not sure about LPs). Was this rare > or fairly widespread? I remember the first non-childrens record I > bought was "I'll Wait For You" by Frankie Avalon. (No picture > sleeve) I was 7 years old and I bought it in an Acme market on a > highway somewhere near the Jersey shore. I'm not even sure I'd ever > heard the song I was just anxious as Marshall Crenshaw says "To be > a part of that Rock and Roll thing". I knew it would be the start > of a magical journey. (Does Frankie even qualify as R&R?) Bill, Nice to say hello to you again.As far as I can tell from my memory, picture sleeves were issued universally, if it was deemed for the artist. I think a picture sleeve was released if the record company had the money, and also if the artist was popular enough to merit one. Picture sleeves were a god way to promote the artists's likeness and I.D... Paul Anka had no picture sleeve for Diana, his first release for ABC-Paramount..however, realizing that Paul was a hit, they subsequently put him on picture sleeves. I think it helped bolster his career. Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 15:20:15 -0000 From: Bob Subject: Re: Bobby Vee Country Paul wrote: > S.J. Dibai, thanks for the "At The Drive-In" review. Uneven > as it seems, I'd still like to have seen it, just for the > history value. Gee, I'd always liked Bobby Vee.... S.J. Dibai: > Country Paul, good to hear from you, and you're welcome. > Don't get me wrong: I've always liked Bobby Vee, too, and I > own a good deal of his work. I just thought that he didn't > sound good on "At The Drive In". Either his voice just hasn't > held up or he's another artist who tries too hard to sound like > he's still 17 instead of just flowing with the sands of time. > Take Paul Anka--his voice doesn't sound anything like it did in > his teen idol phase, but I saw him on TV a couple of years ago > and he sounded great. S.J. There is an explanation for Bobby Vee's vocals sounding like they did. He did the show prior to an operation that he had to have performed on his throat. There were a couple of problem areas in his throat that I won't get into here, but they had to be addressed, and they were taken care of by a surgeon in Nashville who regularly does these types of procedures on singers. He now sounds more like his old self thanks to that procedure. Bob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 16:12:14 -0000 From: beegleaw23185 Subject: Re: Manhattans - Kiss And Say Goodbye Phil Milstein says: > I imagine it won't be for many more years still until I'm able to > listen to "Kiss And Say Goodbye" with anything near objectivity." Whilst not exactly overenamoured of the song myself, I do find that it is far more palatable when one listens to the X-Rated Version. This has a far longer spoken intro, and alters the meaning of the song considerably. It starts off with the 'lady' being called 'the Baddest Bitch' he's ever known, and accuses her of beating him up for the two years they have been sleeping together .. in fact he has been at the hospital so much the staff know him very well. I don't know if it was released as a regular single, but it does exist as a DJ copy .. Columbia AS 263 (ZSP 162527), is in Mono and the lable copy does state 'Warning. Not Recommended For Airplay'. Of course, with the junk played today, I guess this is quite tame, but in 1976 I believe it safe to say a few eyebrows would have been raised ... The B side is also Rated X - I Kinda Missed You. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 07:49:30 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Jerry Fuller Austin Roberts wrote: > Jerry Fuller, the great writer and producer,was also a good > singer and loved Pucket's voice because he could write the > kind of songs that he (Jerry) liked to sing (big ballads), > consequently, many great records, most of which Jerry wrote > and produced. Met Jerry Fuller in his office in Hollywood years ago. He was a wonderful person to talk to, very personable. Besides, he said I sang good! lol Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 07:46:59 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Re: Lloyd Price and Harold Logan Dave, I've been doing some research on Harold Logan. It appears from what i can find, that Logan was a songwirter out of West Virginia originally, met Price somehow before the Korean war. Price then went into the army, came out and resumed his relationship with Logan. However, Price and Logan moved to Washington D.C at this time. I feel that Logan probably contributed to some song material, but that Price was the main man musically. If anyone has any info on their writing partner ship, I'd be interested in hearing about it. I'm also interested in where and how Price met Logan. Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2003 08:43:04 -0800 (PST) From: Watson Macblue Subject: All This and World War II I have actually seen this masterpiece of Deranged Cinema - once. The BBC (or Channel 4 - anyway, someone who should have known better) actually transmitted it in the earlyish 90s. Imagine a cross between the Bee Gees' Sergeant Pepper and Triumph of the Will; older British Spectropoppers might think that the editor of All Our Yesterdays (remember?) has been at the pills again. The largest part of the production budget must have been the rights payments to Pathe, as it's all documentary footage, cut in a cool, hip (aaargh!!! NOOOOOOOOOOO!!! Yuk!!) way to Beatles tunes sung by anyone who could be persuaded, bribed or blackmailed into taking part on one of the weirdest, phoniest, dumbest offshoots of Beatlemania. I can remember raising a weary smile to "Here Comes The Sun King" cut to footage of Pearl Harbor, but I'm strange that way. I remember someone once saying that telling Bryan Ferry you had a copy of his ATAWW2 version of She's Leaving Home would earn you a face similar to the one you get by telling someone I Have The Negatives. Do your mind a favor, fellas. Give this one a miss. God, I feel all strange now ... Watson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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