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Spectropop - Digest Number 1191



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 19 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. My biog ?
           From: Artie Wayne 
      2. Re: Ruby and the Romantics
           From: Mikey 
      3. Re: A Rock N' Roll mystery ?
           From: Steveo 
      4. Re: The Ventures
           From: Austin Roberts 
      5. Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King
           From: Austin Roberts 
      6. Re: US Chart Question, Still Unanswered
           From: Bill Brown 
      7. Re: Gilbert O'Sullivan
           From: Stuart Miller 
      8. re-interpretation of a hit
           From: Albabe Gordon 
      9. Re: Burt Bacharach
           From: Albabe Gordon 
     10. Re: Beatles Covers
           From: S.J. Dibai 
     11. Re: Ruby and the Romantics
           From: S.J. Dibai 
     12. The Orlons As Backup Singers
           From: S.J. Dibai 
     13. Re: Burt Bacharach / Trini Lopez
           From: Mick Patrick 
     14. Re: Poets and more O'Sullivan
           From: Mark Frumento 
     15. Ventures originals
           From: Doc Rock 
     16. Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King / Ruby & the Romantics
           From: Mick Patrick 
     17. Re: wicked Beatles covers
           From: Stewart Mason 
     18. Re: Burt Bacharach / Trini Lopez "Made In Paris"
           From: Don Charles 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 08:08:10 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: My biog ? That Alan........thank you for all the nice things you said about my website. I was given an advance to write my biography in 1969 ........but I gave it back when I realized I'd never get to spend it if I wrote about everything I knew!! Now it's 34 years later..... and over the next week I'm going over my decades of notes and pull out a new chapter or two that hopefully will catch the attention of a book publisher in the coming year. Wishing you the happiest of holidays, regards Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 15:36:24 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Ruby and the Romantics Justin McDevitt: > It's good to see some postings on this group regarding Ruby and > The Romantics. My favorite song by this wonderful harmony group > is When You're Young And In Love. Although I enjoy the > Marvellettes early 1967 version of this track, R and The R's > slower, softer treatment really brings out the essence of the > lyrics, without that Motown edge. Speaking of Ruby, a lot of people don't know that Ruby and her group did the very first version of "Hurting Each Other". The Carpenters heard it and covered it. mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 08:53:24 -0800 (PST) From: Steveo Subject: Re: A Rock N' Roll mystery ? Denis Gagnon: > So, one of the record (45') that he made me hear, was "Wait a > minute" by the Vogues.... Denis, The Vogues recorded in America on the label CO & CE Records, a label formed by Herb Cohen out of Pennsylvania. Quality Records of Canada released a lot of records from America such as "It's My Party" (Leslie Gore on Mercury), etc. I am currently researching your information, 'cause I am interested also. Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:29:12 EST From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: The Ventures For some reason I thought Jorgan Ingmann (?) wrote it and recorded it in his garage, thus being the first to record it. Could be wrong; won't be the first time. Best, Austin Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:39:17 EST From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King As I remember it (but my memory is wounded), Clydie and Vanetta Fields were in the Blossoms in 1972 when they sang backgrounds on my record of Somethings Wrong With Me. Like I said, my memory ain't what it used to be. Austin Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 11:54:06 -0800 (PST) From: Bill Brown Subject: Re: US Chart Question, Still Unanswered Paul Bryant: > I posed a question but got no answer - so I would like to try again. > We were discussing crooners and someone pointed out that a > particular croon has been a real big hit in the Adult Contemporary > chart, but not on the Billboard/Cashbox pop chart. In Britain we do > not have these different charts (or didn't in the 60s/70s anyway). > So I was puzzled - is it true that a record could sell enough to be > in the top 20 pop chart, but because it was not a pop song (say it > was a country song, or an "adult contemporary" croon tune) it would > be excluded from the Billboard/Cashbox chart? This might be something that you should write to Billboard directly, because any answer we might have would only be speculation. They would know for sure. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:14:36 -0000 From: Stuart Miller Subject: Re: Gilbert O'Sullivan Albabe gordon wrote: > Besides, the point that I was discussing is that some people > think they know what the song "Claire" is about. How can > anyone besides G. O. know what G. O. means? Well, my claim to knowing what it was about was because he was telling the world about it in endless interviews when the record was released. > As soon as he stopped writing dirty songs, he dropped out of > sight. I'm not entirely sure (being British and therefore culturally constipated) whether you're being serious or not here. I strongly suspect you are not, but just on the off chance that you are, then I have to rush to the defence of an artist I thought was one of the most boring and dullest performers ever to emerge from anywhere. He got invloved in a long and serious legal dispute with Gordon Mills which took many years to resolve. He won millions of pounds or even more millions of dollars. If you're nice to him, he might lend you $10! Stuart Miller -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 12:17:36 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: re-interpretation of a hit I know this is a '70s interpretation of a '60s tune, but I thought I'd throw it out there anyway. Did someone already mention Earth, Wind and Fire's, "Got To Get You Into My Life?" If not, consider it wholeheartedly mentioned. I think this is one of the most incredible "interpretations" of a previous hit. Great arrangement, great vocals. best dishes, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 12:46:18 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: Re: Burt Bacharach Mick Patrick said: > Here's a poser for all you Bacharach experts. What was the > first record on which Burt was credited as producer? No prizes > for the correct answer, except my admiration. > > Still waiting for a correct answer. What? no Bacharach experts > out there? :-) I know you asked specifically for "Production" credit, Mick, but in light of that title's many different definitions, I'll take a few guesses in terms of Burt being the main creative guy on a certain record... Could it be "The Blob" by The Five Blobs (9/58)? I'm not sure there are Production credits on that single. Or... the earliest record I have with his credit is "Baby It's You" by The Shirelles (12/61). He received "Arrangement" credit on that one, Produced by Luther Dixon. And one of my faves: "Make It Easy On Yourself" by Jerry Butler ( 6/62) has no production credit but does have an "Arranged" credit for Burt. Or maybe it's an early Dionne Warwick song, like something from the album with "Don't Make Me Over" (11/62) which is an actual Production credit for Burt and Hal David. mazaroba, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:58:09 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Re: Beatles Covers Chris wrote: > Possible topic for a new thread: non-copycat cover versions of > Beatles tunes which work on their *own* terms. Okay, how about The Buckinghams' rendition of "I Call Your Name"? Lively, great harmonies and arrangement with horns and piano. A cool interpretation, though I still prefer The Beatles' version. Lou Christie's version of "If I Fell" from the LIGHTNIN' STRIKES LP is also very good. A pure adult pop arrangement, with strings and horns, with Lou crooning (yeah, that's right, crooning) and no falsetto. He alters some of the lyrics, which changes the meaning of the song somewhat, but it's still good. Australia's Rolling Stones, better known as The Masters Apprentices, did a funky, groovy midtempo cover of "I Feel Fine," injecting it with even more R&B than the Beatles could have imagined. Honorable mention: The Cyrkle's version of "I'm Happy Just To Dance With You," done in a dreamy arrangement with twangy sitar and all. It makes for interesting listening, but the problem is that you can't, er, DANCE to it! This should be a great thread. S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:59:39 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Re: Ruby and the Romantics Justin McDevitt wrote: > It's good to see some postings on this group regarding Ruby and > The Romantics. Speaking of which, anyone here familiar with The Tymes' obscure 1964 single "The Magic Of Our Summer Love"? This is a direct rip-off of Ruby & the Romantics' sound if I've ever heard one. But it's damn good! S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 21:01:50 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: The Orlons As Backup Singers Hello, Spectropoppers! I've read that The Orlons did some session singing before making their own records. Does anyone know of any specific recordings they sang on? For example, it sounds suspiciously like them on Bobby Rydell's "Good Time Baby." Thanks, S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 22:15:25 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Burt Bacharach / Trini Lopez Me: > Here's a poser for all you Bacharach experts. What was the first > record on which Burt was credited as producer? No prizes for the > correct answer, except my admiration. Phil Milstein: > Lou Johnson? Not correct. Bacharach's first credited production is earlier. > Speaking of Burt & Hal, I caught a movie on TCM last night, "Made > In Paris," starring Ann-Margret at her prime (c.'66?), that > featured a Bacharach-David title theme, sung by Trini Lopez. > Despite making it a practice to try and catch every pre-accident > A-M flick, I'd never heard of this one before, and wonder if the > song is well-known, released on record, covered, etc. Bacharach rocks, yes? This fantastic track was released on Reprise 0435 in January 1966. It bubbled under the Billboard Hot 100 at #113. For the record, it was "Arranged & Conducted by Burt Bacharach for Don Costa Productions, Inc". To my knowledge Trini's is the only version of this song. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 21:39:36 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Poets and more O'Sullivan Albabe Gordon wrote: > And would it be better said here, if I were to try to dazzle > anyone with my reading habits, by quoting Yeates, or G. B. Shaw > or maybe Joyce? I love Ulysses... but you can't dance to it. Well it would be a first around here. But actually Joyce and Yeats were quite musical in their approach. Joyce after all, from what I understand, was a decent singer. > Besides, the point that I was discussing is that some people > think they know what the song "Claire" is about. How can > anyone besides G. O. know what G. O. means? Shwew! This is stretching something! In some cases song lyrics can be pretty straight forward. In this case I think they are. Maybe I missed something? LOL! > And when asked, a lot of poets answered that they weren't sure > about what their own words mean. Really? Joyce was pretty clear about what he wrote. He certainly could explain the Anna Livia Plurabella section of Finegans Wake. Perhaps it's the French that can't explain what they wrote. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 16:45:07 -0500 From: Doc Rock Subject: Ventures originals >From the book Liberty Records: BOB BOGLE: Yeah, a lot of times we'd write these songs. Now, we had to come up with so much material, it was almost like a factory! Today, one LP by an artist might be pushed for months and months. We were turning out these LP and songs, we'd work on the melodies, the chords, and the arrangements in rehearsals. And we just wouldn't have titles for them! We'd do an LP, we'd be working on what we called "Original #1," "Original #2," and "Original #3," and so on. The producers and everyone would say, "We gotta have titles for these songs!" So, we'd answer, "We're workin' on it, we're thinkin'!" What we did was get help from people, suggestions from people like the secretaries around Liberty. They would help us name songs. I don't even know where half of those titles came from! Someone would suggest a title and someone else would say, "Yeah, that kinda fits," and we'd say "Yeah, sure, fine, whatever, put it down!" Doc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 22:01:44 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King / Ruby & the Romantics Tony Leong: > I agree about the fine quality of those 2 Ruby and the Romantic > songs "Does He Really Care For Me" and "Your Baby Doesn't Love > You Anymore"--excellent cuts they are Mick. > > I have always wondered--Do the Blossoms back Clydie King on > "The Thrill Is Gone" from 1965?? I've just listened to "The Thrill Is Gone" on headphones. To my ears, it doesn't sound like the Blossoms on back-ups. Mike McKay: > Am I correct in assuming that the first of the two Ruby tracks > you mention is the same song that was subsequently covered (with > an appropriate sex change) by The Searchers? If so, it's a great > one. It would be cool to hear the original. Yep, same song. The Seachers' version is excellent. Of course, Ruby & the Romantics' is the original and the best. Trust me. Mikey: > Speaking of Ruby, a lot of people don't know that Ruby and her > group did the very first version of "Hurting Each Other". The > Carpenters heard it and covered it. Not correct, I'm afraid. Ruby & the Romantics' version of "Hurting Each Other" (A & M 1042, 1969) was preceded by Jimmy Clanton's rendition (Mala 500, 1965). Can anyone tell me if Ruby and her boys' recording is available on CD? Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:44:02 -0800 (PST) From: Stewart Mason Subject: Re: wicked Beatles covers Paul Bryant wrote: > "Well, the standard meaning of the word "wicked" was > inverted by hip-hop vernacular (good-bad, not evil, > you might say)." Ah, but folks from Boston were using the term wicked in a similar manner decades before hip-hop was invented...although I'm still not entirely sure I can quite parse the meaning of the variant "wicked pissa." Phil M. is entirely right that Ed Cobb's "Dirty Water," which he once claimed was written after a couple of guys tried to mug him and his girlfriend in Kenmore Square, has been thoroughly adopted by the locals, especially Red Sox fans. Personally, I'm waiting for Phil's own "Ciao Allston" to claim its place in the annals of Townie Rock. Re Beatles covers that work: Wes Montgomery's last few albums had several Beatles covers that mostly didn't particularly work, but his CTI Records labelmate (and anointed sucessor) George Benson's THE OTHER SIDE OF ABBEY ROAD is surprisingly good. Even better is Booker T and the MGs' McLEMORE AVENUE, which is also a full-album cover of ABBEY ROAD. (Both albums also reference that famous cover photo on their own sleeves.) S -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2003 22:10:05 -0000 From: Don Charles Subject: Re: Burt Bacharach / Trini Lopez "Made In Paris" I love this record! It practically shouts the '60s! I first heard it on Rhino's Burt Bacharach boxed set, and I've been in love with it ever since. A stereo mix is what I'd like to hear. Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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