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Spectropop - Digest Number 1188



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 26 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Rokes / Yardbirds
           From: S.J. Dibai 
      2. Re: Isley Meets Bacharach
           From: S.J. Dibai 
      3. Jim Croce
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. Re: Artie Wayne
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      5. Re: Aldon Music Staffers / Bacharach
           From: Artie Wayne 
      6. Re: The Ventures
           From: Mike Edwards 
      7. Re: Orpheus
           From: Mike Edwards 
      8. Notes and quotes
           From: Country Paul 
      9. Chanukah music
           From: Phil Milstein 
     10. Re: He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss)
           From: JD Doyle 
     11. Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King / Ruby & the Romantics
           From: Mick Patrick 
     12. Lloyd Price and Harold Logan
           From: Steveo 
     13. Re: Burt Bacharach - One Less Bell To Answer
           From: Marc Wielage 
     14. The Soul Club
           From: Will Stos 
     15. Re: Orpheus
           From: Orion 
     16. Re: Bad Lines / Beach Boys
           From: Steve Grant 
     17. Joey Heatherton on "The Jackie Gleason Show"
           From: John H 
     18. Re: Beatles' 1976 aborted reunion attempt?
           From: Eddy 
     19. Truly bad; Paul Hampton; Jim Pepper is Jim Pepper; more
           From: Country Paul 
     20. Re. Good and bad lyrics/ "uptight" / "Walk Away Renee"
           From: Richard Williams 
     21. Metro Soul Playlist 21st December
           From: Simon White 
     22. Re: Al Capps
           From: Bob 
     23. Re: Beatles' 1976 aborted reunion attempt?
           From: Andres 
     24. Re: Bad Lines/So Lonely
           From: Mike McKay 
     25. Re: Del Shannon
           From: Marc Wielage 
     26. Re: Rokes / Yardbirds
           From: Mike McKay 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 22:47:43 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Re: Rokes / Yardbirds Fred Clemens wrote: > Rather than spell it out here, follow the link to see who really > copied who: http://www.bobshannon.com/fred/letslive.html Fred, this rocks! You really did you homework. I bet that Garth Watt- Roy is the guy who co-wrote a song for The Hollies--"Magic Woman Touch," if memory serves. Thanks, S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 22:50:22 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Re: Isley Meets Bacharach Simon Bell: > Has anyone heard the new album - "Here I Am, Isley Meets > Bacharach"? It's a masterpiece produced & arranged by Burt, > with vocals from Ronald Isley of the Isley Brothers. He > does staggering versions of Alfie, In Between The Heartaches, > Make It Easy On Yourself, The Look of Love, Anyone Who Had A > Heart & others. Check out a couple of samples at Amazon: > http://tinyurl.com/3xvvv Mick Patrick: > I second that. The CD is magnificent, a must for Bacharach fans. > I was especially pleased to see, in amongst the uber-familiar > David/Bacharach titles you mention, Ronnie's versions of "In > Between The Heartaches" and "Windows Of The World". If only > La Warwick had looked after her voice like Ronnie Isley > obviously has. > > There are also two very recent Bacharach compositions on the CD: > "Count On Me" and "Love's (Still) The Answer", both written with > lyricist Tonio K. They're both excellent songs. > > A website is mentioned on the CD package. It might be worth a > gander: http://www.isleymeetsbacharach.com I saw this "Burt Bacharach Tribute On Ice" yesterday. Bacharach and a band (including a couple of mediocre singers) played and sang his songs while ice skaters skated to them. They played a video recording of Ron Isley singing "Here I Am," a song that Bacharach admitted to having forgotten about! Isley did a stunning job on it, and now I'm even more curious to hear the whole CD. S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 15:39:46 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Jim Croce Jim Croce! Now you're talking about a local boy from the Philly area. I saw him twice, once at the Spectrum in Philly and once at the Philly Folk Festival (got a Cd of that recently). I remember him doing some really bawdy material, definately not his Top 40 stuff. Met a guy once who had met Jim. Jim and his wife were living in some farm house that was plagued with bats. The landlord wouldn't do anything about it so Jim decided to take matter into his own hands. He got a hammer and a burlap bag, stunned the bats on their heads with the hammer and dumped them into the bag. When he had enough bats he drove them over to the landlord's place and let dumped the bag on the porch. I guess PETA wouldn't ask him to do a benefit for them if Jim were still around today. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 16:44:06 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Artie Wayne Artie Wayne, I just had to tell you how much I enjoyed your website. I highly recomend all our fellow S`pop members to check it out. Seeing your face with all those heavy hitters in the music business reminded me of Woody Allen's Zelig. You are everywhere! The whole group should read your bio, maybe some day if we're all lucky, you'll write a book? Happy and Healthy Holidays to All, That alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 16:50:31 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Aldon Music Staffers / Bacharach Steveo.........How ya' doin'? Around 1963 Burt Bacharach and Hal David had offices at Famous Music in the Brill building. When I was looking for some material for Joey Powers, Burt played me "Message to Martha", which I loved but I thought was too complex for the artist. I idolized him and for the first [and last] time in my career I apologized for turning down a song. When I ran into him a few weeks later, in London, where he was acting as musical director for Marlena Deitrich, we had a drink and laughed about the incident. regards, Artie Wayne --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier uploading and sharing -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 02:04:05 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: The Ventures Michael Kelly writes: > And Ventures LPs? Well, they have released over eighty (count 'em, > 80!)LPs in the USA, over 150 LPs world-wide! They kept the same line- > up of four members for over 25 years! Their other claims to fame > include: > Six Gold LPs: > Walk, Don't Run -- 1960 > Telstar and the Lonely Bull -- 1963 > Golden Greats -- 1967 > Hawaii Five-0 -- 1969 > 10th Anniversary Album -- 1970 > Pops in Japan -- 1970 I like the Ventures and I know they made those tuition LPs that enabled many of our guitar heroes to become experts. But there is a limit. The six gold LPs listed above are pretty lame. Take "Telstar And The Lonely Bull" neither of the title tunes can hold a candle to the original versions by the Tornados and the Tijuana Brass. Other tracks such as "Apache", "Calcutta" and "Tequila" are also weak copies of the originals by Jorgan Ingman, Lawrence Welk (yeah, really) and the Champs. So what did we have? An instrumental hits LP for someone who couldn't be bothered to pick up the singles. It has always seemed to me that they were a rocker's version of Percy Faith and/or Billy Vaughn, releasing 2 or 3 LPs a year loaded with their versions of the hits of the day, without adding anything to them. But all is not lost as they did put out some good 45s. I'm going to compile a list and post it in the New Year. The "2,000lb Bee" will be among them because you won't find it on any of the LPs listed above. Michael Kelly also writes: > They have sold over 10 million LPs -- in the tiny country of Japan, > alone! That's not such a tiny country, though. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 01:55:53 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: Orpheus Mark T writes: > Question for the Orpheus fans, which there are obviously a few > on here: I have the double CD that came out in England years ago. > Is it missing any essential songs? I know it doesn't have a great > deal of the last album on Bell...... I know what you're saying, Mark. Are there are more songs that might justify the hype that has surrounded this group in recent postings? The hype is not justified by the tracks you have. I first heard "Can't Find The Time To Tell You" when I moved to Boston in 1993. It was one of the few non-standard oldies on WODS 103 FM, no doubt because they were a local group as were the Standells. It's a great song: very tuneful with nice harmonies. So good, that I trolled Commonwealth Avenue looking for albums by Orpheus to see if they had recorded some other good stuff. I found two, "Orpheus" and "Joyful". Both are pretty ordinary and in looking at the track lists now, I couldn't identify any of the tunes except "Me About You", which is totally eclipsed by the Turtles' version. I bought the Varese CD last year and it got one outing on my car CD player. There are a lot of harmonies but without strong songs, it's all pretty mundane. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 21:29:59 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Notes and quotes Birthdays, December 21st: Bobby Colomby of BS&T (1944), Patti Smith (1946), Peter Criss of Kiss (1947) and producer Alan Parsons (1948). I heard a very funny Christmas song - and a very good one too - called "Alan Parsons in a Winter Wonderland" on WFMU; I forget the artist, but it's on a single (can anyone tell me who and what, please?). I'll misquote this, but the bridge goes: "In the meadow we can build a snowman And pretend that he is Alan Parsons (something I don't remember about getting a booking on) Carson" (Sorry if that went over our worldwide friends' head - Johnny Carson was the legendary former host of the "Tonight" show, the leading late-night talkfest and an outlet for music performance as well. or am I being too obvious?) Marty: > I have the Rainy Day #45-8001 by The Flying Machine. Here's the info > per my copy: NIGHT OWL / BRIGHTEN YOUR NIGHT WITH MY DAY (Stock copy > with "Night Owl" shown as the "a" side) Both sides written by James > Taylor - A side arr by Trade Martin & Al Gorgoni - Prod. by Chip > Taylor & Gorgoni. B side arr. by Gorgoni - Prod by Taylor & Gorgoni. Thank you! Paul Bryant Re: Crooners: > Frankie [Vaughn] was major up to 1963.... ...Although "Judy" wasn't a ballad by any means; rather good record, even if he was "dragging" an oversized orchestra and chorus around the song with him. > [Re: crooners,] I shan't bore you with a list of > dreadful records, but Englebert Humperdinck is probably the chief > malefactor. Amen! > Not all crooning was bad - Tom Jones was pretty good in fact. And > classic 50s crooning can be wonderful - can't beat Perry Como.... Agreed - "Magic Moments" is sweet (I also like the Erasure version), "Wanted" is the epitome of the style,and the dude could rock out on stuff like "Tina Marie," although see the above comment about dragging too many other musicians along! Doug: > when a local newspaper writer tracked down Rick Evans in 1979 > for a "where are they now" type piece, Evans had this to say: "I'm > doing roots music," he laughed....I never liked tha> Simon and > Garfunkel shit me and Zager were doing in the first place." At least he knew. Dan, re: best lines, saying this isn't from a real song: > "I've been so miserable since you left me / It's almost like you're > here." Something like it is; I just don't remember what! Simon White Re: Worst Rhyme In A Song? > "It's on America's tortured brow > That Mickey Mouse has grown up a cow" Personally, I think this is a rather good one! Jules: > Gary Puckett and the Union Gap's "Young Girl" takes the prize > for the most non-PC, morally suspect or perhaps just plain > nave lyrics of all, si?...well of any HIT single, that is. Uh-hu - second to the ultimately morally reprehensible "You're Having My Baby" by that short guy who ought to know better. (But then again, he did it his way - which is also on my lyric sheet of the Jukebox >From Hell.) John Love: > I think that describing Ronnie [Spector] as a rock star at > all, let alone the first [Connie Francis, Brenda Lee, Darlene > Love (?)....] is going a bit far. Ronnie was part of a group > that burned brightly very briefly [only one top ten hit > remember].... But despite the lesser success than her Philles labelmates, she maintained her presence and rose to be "the" identifiable icon of the era and style. Few folks off this list would recognize Darlene Love or one of the Crystals in their original hitmaking days; most know - or know of - Ronnie. (See Paul Bryant's comment on my comment about long-lasting and low-but-long-charting records.) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 21:55:17 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Chanukah music Yesterday's Boston Globe had an article entitled "Band Redefines Sounds Of Hanukkah," about a local group that is currently marketing an album mostly of Chanukah songs. I'll be happy to provide the text of that article to Larry Lapka, or to anyone else who writes me about it offline. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 05:13:54 -0000 From: JD Doyle Subject: Re: He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss) Phil Milstein wrote: > Another one for the He Hit Me list: > The Cookies: Chains oh, but Phil, those "are not the kind that you can see"....:) JD Doyle -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 08:20:27 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Darlene Love / Clydie King / Ruby & the Romantics Joe Somsky: > Hope to see you all at the Darlene Love Solid Gold Christmas > Show, Symphony Space, Broadway at 95th Street, Manhattan, 8pm > Friday December 19th. Hey Joe, how was the show? Blow by blow, please. :-) Art Longmire: > Also picked up the "Phil's Spectre" CD, and wanted to single out > the song "Missin' My Baby" by Clydie King-that song is just the > ultimate in greatness. I have a later record that she did on > Lizard Records but it's nowhere near as outstanding-I need to > hear more of her earlier recordings. You can't go wrong with Clydie's singles for the Imperial label, Art. All three are magnificently Spectorized to the max, courtesy producers Jerry Riopell(e) and Marshall Leib. Unfortunately, they are very expensive items, due to their popularity on the Northern Soul scene. Expect one of them to be included on "Phil's Spectre, Vol 2". > ..."Hey There Lonely Boy", (which I still think RULES over > the redo as "Hey There, Lonely Girl"). It was really esoteric > and I'm sure NO ONE knows this. > except a few weenies...It was actually Ruby & The Romantics. > They did the original. To all who like Clydie's "Missin' My Baby", might I recommend two equally marvellous tracks by Ruby & the Romantics: "Does He Really Care For Me" and "Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore" - excellent songs, gorgeously smooth vocals and Righteous Brothers- style productions. Did you know that Darlene Love (or Wright, as she was then known) made her recording debut singing background on a Clydie King record back in 1957? Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 14:43:59 -0800 (PST) From: Steveo Subject: Lloyd Price and Harold Logan I would like to know how much truth there is in the story that Mr. Lloyd Price agreed to share writing royalties with his subsequently murdered (1969) business manager Harold Logan. Someone said that Mr. Logan really had no part in the co-composing of Lloyd's songs. I wonder if anyone has any info on this. Steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 01:03:12 -0800 From: Marc Wielage Subject: Re: Burt Bacharach - One Less Bell To Answer Geoff Kaiser: > Does anyone know if anyone recorded "One Less Bell to Answer" > before the Fifth Dimension, perhaps with Burt Bacharach's > involvement? My notes on this song say: The 5th Dimension's third-biggest pop hit, featuring lead singer Marilyn McCoo, and produced by Bones Howe. Originally recorded as obscure singles by Keely Smith in 1967, and by Rosemary Clooney in 1968. In the spring of 1970, The 5th Dimension performed this song "live" on an episode of the hit ABC-TV spy series IT TAKES A THIEF, where the last note of the song triggered a hidden bomb. This was their second hit with the word "Bell" in the title; the first was 'Wedding Bell Blues' from 1970. Songwriter Burt Bacharach later revealed in interviews that the hit was inspired by a remark by his then-girlfriend Angie Dickinson, who was living with him in London in late 1967. As they were in the process of moving back to America and leaving their apartment for good, the doorbell rang and Angie quipped, "well, that'll be one less bell to answer once we're gone." --Marc W. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 05:17:04 -0000 From: Will Stos Subject: The Soul Club Hi Spectropoppers, I just stumbled across a site called http://the.soulclub.org which has hundreds of really hard-to-find tunes available for your listening pleasure. Does anybody know who runs this? I'm amazed at all the songs listed and found some songs, like the Bonnets' "Ya Gotta Take A Chance" that I've been looking for forever. I did a search of the archives but didn't see it mentioned in any other postings. Can someone provide a little more info? Are there other sites like this out there? Will -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 06:16:16 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: Orpheus Mark T: > I have the double CD that came out in England years ago. Is it > missing any essential songs? Tom wrote: > The Ace Records / Big Beat 2CD compilation from 1995 has all the > songs from the first three MGM albums except for "Lesley's World" > from the first LP and "Don't Be So Serious" from the second. It is > also missing eight tracks from their excellent fourth album for Bell > Records. I own all four of the LPs also, and the only one I still don't give a spin is the 4th LP "Orpheus" on the Bell label. It has a much darker, less poppy sound to it. Of course, it doesn't mean the 4th LP is not good music, just one that I don't prefer. Peace, Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2003 14:03:00 -0500 From: Steve Grant Subject: Re: Bad Lines / Beach Boys Paul Bryant wrote: > Next up, Al Jardine from the Holland album, "California Saga": > "Have you ever been to a festival, the Big Sur congregation? > Where Country Joe will do his show > And he'd sing about liberty > And the people there in the open air, one big family. > Yeah the people there love to sing and share > Their new found liberty" > 10 points on the cringe-ometer for that one.... I'll see your 10 points and raise you 10: Have you ever been down Salinas way? Where Steinbeck found the valley And he wrote about it the way it was In his travelins with Charley. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 05:46:56 -0000 From: John H Subject: Joey Heatherton on "The Jackie Gleason Show" I just caught this late-60s episode featuring everyone's favorite Golddigger playing, what else, a go-go dancer with lots of spunk! She performed a song called "Let's Close the Generation Gap," and it appeared she was miming it to a recorded backing track. Was this ever a single? I'm currently in love with Heatherton's "When You Call Me Baby." I'm hoping this makes it to a future installment of "Where the Girls Are" (please, Santa?) as it's just too good to leave in the vaults. Was this a cover, by chance? -John H. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 08:53:04 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Beatles' 1976 aborted reunion attempt? C. Ponti: > Has anyone read this story on Drudge about the disinterring of > masters from '76 cut at Davlen in L.A.? The general conclusion on this seems to be that it's a C&B story. That Chrismon guy who is mentioned in the article somewhere is trying to sell the tape through his Yahoo Beatles group, claiming he has proof it's the real thing. He just doesn't seem inclined to provide that proof. The "Moments in Time" mentioned, is the auction site that got involved (& got scandalised) in the sale of the autographed copy of Chapman's Double Fantasy. Nevertheless, Chrismon basically admits he's selling a blank tape, but suggests that there may still be enough data on it to "recover" something. But just about everybody else thinks it's just a hoax. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 02:21:39 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Truly bad; Paul Hampton; Jim Pepper is Jim Pepper; more Speaking of REALLY bad, S. J. Dibai: > Worst rhyme?....Eric Burdon and the Animals, "When I Was Young": > "I smoked my first cigarette at ten/And for girls, I had a bad > yen" and "I met my first love at thirteen/She was brown, and I > was pretty green" - give me a break! Add to that his awkward rants in "Spill The Wine." Painfully obvious hi-skool poetry, right up there with fellow poseur Jim Morrison. Just my opinion - so sue me; I also usually like David Bowie's lyrics, although "Put on your red shoes and dance the blues" ["Let's Dance"] did make me wince. Dan Hughes and Michael Edwards, Re: Paul Hampton: In an earlier post I mentioned a 45 he had on Dot c. 1960 - "Creams" and "Two Hour Honeymoon." Both were spoken-word over music; "Creams" was cute, over a jazz bed; "Honeymoon" is a guy dying after a car crash; starts efective, gets really maudlin. Nice sleazy strip-club type instrumental behind. I used to have a copy of this, but it walked away. (See Digests 732, 733 and 737; search for "Paul Hampton" at the home page.) Mark: > Art Longmire: you mentioned that Jim Pepper was a member of Everything > is Everything. I'm not so sure about that - my understanding is that > there were two versions of "Witchi-Tai-To" that competed for audience > attention. One was by Everything is Everything (on the Vanguard > Apostolic label), the other by Jim Pepper's Pow-Wow (on the Atlantic > subsid Embryo). Both versions were really Jim Pepper; he was in E is E. I preferred that earlier version, personally. Austin Powell, thank you for the info on Monty Babson. Crooner or not, I still think "I Wish It Were You" is a really nice ballad. Mike Edwards, re "Dadrock": the term reminds me that there was an actual Canadian group, the Mom and Dads, who were one old Mom and two old Dads (I'd guess in their 60s) who had a sloggy surprise middle-road hit call "The Mom and Dads' Waltz." I heard it once - once was enough. Ending on an up note, Harold Shackelford wrote re: Best line in a song: > This whole song by Tom T. Hall is one great line but I'll > cut to the chase: > "Ain't but three things in this world that's worth a solitary dime, > But old dogs and children and watermelon wine." And in a similar vein, from a recent Bill Anderson ("Still") song; "Only two things get better with time: A Good Love and a Bottle of Wine." (The title line, if you want to find the CD.) Country Paul (who thinks that whatever Casey Kasem is or isn't off-mike, he's as sincere as a three-dollar bill when he is on) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 10:33:28 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re. Good and bad lyrics/ "uptight" / "Walk Away Renee" 1 The exchanges on good and bad lyrics are very rewarding, although I think those who put forward Dylan's nonsense lyrics as examples of the latter are missing the point. And I must say that I believe that the use of the word "nonchalant" in "When You Walk In The Room" is a sublime choice, resonant of '60s aspirations. 2 Speaking of which, I'm absolutely sure (from personal recollection) that "uptight" enjoyed a brief usage, circa '66, as a synonym for "groovy", "happening", "far-out", etc, before being redefined to mean "small-minded", repressed", "bent out of shape by society's pliers", etc. Can anyone else produce a similar example of a vernacular term changing its meaning so completely? 3 "Walk Away Renee" is one of the few great songs, I think, to exist in three outstandingly and completely different versions -- by the Left Banke, Four Tops and Rickie Lee Jones. Not just covers, complete revisions of equal artistic merit. Any more? Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 06:44:59 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Metro Soul Playlist 21st December The playlist for 21st December 2003 was - 01 MAJOR LANCE - AINT NO SOUL LEFT IN THESE OLD SHOES - SS CD 01 2 TAMMI TERRELL - THIS OLD HEART OF MINE - MOTOWN 3 EDWIN STARR - HE WHO PICKS A ROSE - TAMLA MOTOWN 4 JESSICA JAMES AND THE OUTLAWS - WE'LL BE MAKING OUT - DYNOVOICE 5 SHIRLEY VAUGHN - STOP AND LISTEN - FAIRMOUNT 6 JACKIE EDWARDS - HERE WE GO AGAIN - DIRECTION 7 DIPLOMATS - I CAN GIVE YOU LOVE - DYNAMO 8 AMBERS - I LOVE YOU BABY - VERVE 9 MAJOR LANCE - NOTHING CAN STOP ME - SS CD 01 10 JINGLE BELLS - BOOKER T AND THE M.G.'S - STAX 11 ADS 12 BARBARA AND BRENDA - NEVER LOVE A ROBIN - DYNAMO 13 BUNNY SIGLER - FOLLOW YOUR HEART - PARKWAY 14 BUNNY SIGLER - I LIED - PHILLY INTERNATIONAL 15 TOMMY HUNT - LOVING ON THE LOSING SIDE - SPARK 16 Album "FUNKY XMAS" - I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" 17 ESTHER PHILLIPS - MAGIC'S IN THE AIR - KUDU 18 BETTY WRIGHT - WHERE IS THE LOVE - RCA 19 FLAMING EMERALDS - HAVE SOME EVERYBODY - FEE 20 ADS 21 INVITATIONS - SKIING IN THE SNOW - DYNOVOICE 22 BEACH GIRLS - SKIING IN THE SNOW - DYNOVOX 23 ARCHIE BELL AND THE DRELLS - MY BALLOON'S GOING UP - ATLANTIC 24 DELFONICS - YOU'LL GET ENOUGH - PHILLY GROOVE 25 JIMMY BREEDLOVE - CAN'T HELP LOVING YOU - ROULETTE 26 POETS - MERRY CHRISTMAS BABY - RED BIRD 27 CHALFONTES - HE LOVES ME - MERCURY 28 POOKIE HUDSON - JEALOUS HEART - DOUBLE L 29 SOLOMON BURKE - SAVE IT - ATLANTIC 30 KOKO TAYLOR - FIRE - CHECKER 31 ADS 32 FELICE TAYLOR - IT MAY BE WINTER OUTSIDE - DEL FI CD 33 CARLA THOMAS - GEE WHIZ IT'S CHRISTMAS - STAX 34 BABY JEAN - IF YOU WANNA - STACY 35 ANNA CRAIG - NOBODY LOVES ME - 20TH CENTURY 36 WILSON PICKETT - COME HOME BABY - ATLANTIC 37 LOVELACE WATKINS - I WON'T BELIEVE IT - GROOVE 38 ERNESTINE ANDERSON - YOU CAN'T BUY LOVE - MERCURY 39 IRENE REID - THE FUNNY THING ABOUT IT - VERVE 40 MARTHA REEVES - TALKING ABOUT LOVE - MOTOWN UNRELEASED 41 RUBY AND THE ROMANTICS - MUCH BETTER OFF THAN I'VE EVER BEEN - KAPP 42 JOHNNY THUNDER - SHOUT IT TO THE WORLD - DIAMOND -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 13:20:04 -0000 From: Bob Subject: Re: Al Capps Stuffed Animal wrote: > Look for the name Al Capps on a record and you can rarely go > wrong! If my memory serves me correctly, I believe Al Capps was a member of the Eligibles, a group who backed Bobby Vee on one LP, "New Sound From England" and a single, "Where Is She". A few years later he arranged "Electric Trains & You" for Bobby Vee and Snuffy Garrett. Getting back to the Eligibles, the group also ties in with Gary Lewis in that one of the members, Ron Hicklin or Hickland, was used by Snuff during Gary Lewis sessions. Snuff had Gary sing along with Ron and I believe Snuff left Ron's vocals on the various tracks. Al Capps was the deep voice on "She's Just My Style", the guy that sang the line, "don't'cha know that she's". The third member was Stan Farber. I know nothing at all about Stan. Perhaps someone here can fill me in on Stan! Bob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 09:07:32 +0300 From: Andres Subject: Re: Beatles' 1976 aborted reunion attempt? C. Ponti wrote: > Has anyone read this story on Drudge about the disinterring of > masters from '76 cut at Davlen in L.A.? ......... Most of the Beatles fans think that these songs are fakes. I also think so... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 01:20:49 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Bad Lines/So Lonely Mike McKay: > How about when you address TWO DIFFERENT people as "you" > in the course of one verse of the same song?! Witness > "So Lonely" by The Hollies S.J. Dibai: > I totally forgot about that one! It always did bother me how they > kept switching like that, as if they couldn't make up their minds > just what this song was supposed to be about. I know the Everly > Brothers did a cover of this--produced by The Hollies, right?-- > but I haven't heard it. Did Don and Phil change the lyrics? Very good question! Yes, The Everly Brothers' version of "So Lonely" is on their "Two Yanks in England" album, along with seven other Hollies originals. The Hollies also back up Don and Phil on these tracks. As for your question, the answer is no...and yes. In the first verse, the same confusion about who "you" is remains. The lyrics here are unaltered: "Every time I see you walkin' down the street with my girl" gives way to "I get so lonely without you." No changes in the second verse or the bridge either, but come the third verse Don and Phil apparently had had enough of this confusion. Instead of the original lyric ("If you get tired of her just send her right on back to my arms"), they sing "If you get tired of lovin' him then come on back to my arms"! > I always loved the 12-string guitar on this Hollies track, but > the lyrics are so poor that I never could truly enjoy it. It's funny...I write for a living and certainly love a good lyric as much as the next person. But for me, really great music will overcome nearly any lyrical shortcomings. On the other hand, great lyrics rarely move me unless they're in the company of music that interests me. It is for this reason that, while I have great respect for Bob Dylan and what he's meant to contemporary music, I rarely listen to him -- because the only time I find him musically interesting is in the "Bringin' It All Back Home"/"Highway 61"/"Blonde on Blonde" era. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 00:56:49 -0800 From: Marc Wielage Subject: Re: Del Shannon Bill Craig commented: > Considering the Petty connection I wonder if there was any > truth to the story that Del might have been added to the > Traveling Wilburys had he lived?..... My understanding is that just after Shannon killed himself in 1990, his wife gave an interview (my memory was that it was in the LA TIMES) in which she said Del had been feeling depressed because a) he'd just gone through a lot of painful dental surgery, b) he had come down with a severe case of the flu, and c) he hadn't yet gotten an answer as to when or if George Harrison and the other members of the Traveling Wilburys were going to hire him as a new "Wilbury Brother," to replace recently-deceased Roy Orbison. Roy had died in late 1988, and I think Del spent most of 1989 hoping he'd get the call. By early 1990, I guess Del had had enough, and decided to end his life that February, in a rustic cabin in a forest, where he was spending a few days alone "writing songs" (as he told his wife). Very sad story. --Marc Wielage -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 26 Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2003 01:04:03 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Rokes / Yardbirds C. Ponti: > Remember gli Rokes? In around '66 I was in Italy and was > really taken by their version of "(La la la la la la) Live > For Today", originally by the Yardbirds. I often wondered, > did the Rokes lease the track and put their vocals on it? > Because the track is identical to the Yarbirds' original. S. J. Dibai: > The Yardbirds? Really? I've never read or heard anything about > that, and believe me, I am well informed about The Yardbirds! > Can you give me any info on the Yardbirds' version? Not likely, since there's no such thing. I thought someone would beat me to replying to this so I didn't bother, but the OP is incorrect. The Yardbirds never recorded "Let's Live for Today." The genesis of this song and how it came to be recorded by The Grass Roots is a complex one. The most thorough account I've seen is here: http://www.bobshannon.com/fred/letslive.html Briefly, it was in fact The Rokes who did the original version -- in Italian. Several other Latin versions followed from countries such as Spain and Italy. There were also a couple of English- language versions which predated The Rokes' own re-recording of the song in English. Here considerable controversy surfaces over how The Grass Roots first came to hear the song. It appears that their version saw release before The Rokes' English-language version. And yet their arrangement of the song is far closer to The Rokes' take on it that any of other English-language versions (by The Living Daylights, et al). You have to read the entire story at the link supplied to come to grips with it all, but the bottom line is that The Rokes first recorded the song that would ultimately become "Let's Live for Today." And The Yardbirds were not involved in any way. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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