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Spectropop - Digest Number 1177



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 19 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Bad Rhymes
           From: Ian Slater 
      2. Re: Orpheus
           From: Art 
      3. Re: Best Lines
           From: Art 
      4. Re: Bad Lines
           From: Rex Strother 
      5. Re: Claire
           From: Ian Chippett 
      6. Re: Orpheus
           From: Mark Frumento 
      7. Re: Bad Lines
           From: John Fox 
      8. Re: Lovin' Spoonful
           From: Steve Harvey 
      9. Re: Snuff Garrett
           From: Bob 
     10. Re: Bad Lines / Good Lines
           From: Artie Wayne 
     11. Re: Snuff Garrett & "Strings"
           From: Artie Wayne 
     12. Re: Crooners
           From: Artie Wayne 
     13. Re: Bad Lines & Rhymes
           From: Mike McKay 
     14. Re: Bad Lines
           From: Tom Taber 
     15. Re: Bobby Shafto
           From: Mark 
     16. Re: Bad rhymes/bad grammar
           From: Mike McKay 
     17. Aldon Music Staffers 1962
           From: Monophonius 
     18. Re: Bad rhymes/bad grammar
           From: James Botticelli 
     19. Re: Bobby Shafto
           From: Rat Pfink 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:03:48 -0000 From: Ian Slater Subject: Re: Bad Rhymes A favourite of mine that always brings a smile to my face is from the Marvelettes' song "Take Me Where You Go": >From the desert where it is hot, To the North Pole where it's not... Part of the naive streak that ran through the superb early Motown output. In a similar vein were the spelling errors on the front covers of albums: "Can't Get Use to Losing you" on Martha and the Vandellas first LP (Come & Get These Memories) and "The Marveletts Sing" on the Marvelettes' second LP. Ian Slater -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:20:06 -0000 From: Art Subject: Re: Orpheus I too am leaning towards getting the BMG Best of Orpheus. I actually haven't heard much of their material, but I found a copy of "Can't Find The Time" back in the early 80's and just couldn't get enough of it, as well as the flip "Lesley's World". At the time I bought this, I was unaware that it had gotten so much airplay in the 60's. I probably wouldn't have heard it-I was living in California at that time. I know that Orpheus recorded a version of "Walk Away Renee"-I'm curious to hear their version. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:29:50 -0000 From: Art Subject: Re: Best Lines Jon Adelson wrote: > One of my favorite lyrics: "Come on baby do a slow float, you're a > good looking riverboat" (Laura Nyro - "Sweet Blindness") As I mentioned in an earlier post, I can't stand the fact that Rolling Stone wouldn't put Laura's "New York Tendaberry" in its top 500 album list. They're every bit as lame as the so-called Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 13:59:45 -0700 From: Rex Strother Subject: Re: Bad Lines >From "She Believes in Me" - Kenny Rogers: "I try to get undressed without the light" And how hard was that, Kenny? Were you afraid the chair was listening? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 16:46:16 EST From: Ian Chippett Subject: Re: Claire > And as for "Claire." I love that song. I really do. And I think > it perfectly reflects a proper relationship with a very little girl. > I get teary whenever I hear that song, thinking of my PROPER > relationships with, for instance, my nieces. I feel a swelling in > my chest when I hear that song... no where else. I haven't read the > lyrics lately, but I think the point of that song was to fool you > into thinking the singer was singing about a "mature" relationship... > until the end. Then when you heard the song the second or third time, > you'd realize that all the improprieties where yours, not the singers. > I'm not pointing fingers at Ian at all, but I think it's sad that we > live in a time when the Mind Police feel this overwhelming need to > protect us from interpretations and misunderstandings, especially when > they diminish a heart's innocence. I certainly wouldn't include myself among the Mind Police: as I said I loved this song at the time as well as G O'S's other stuff but he was never the world's sharpest lyricist and he slipped up here with the "you get to me in a way I can't describe" bit. I don't really suppose he was saying what he seemed to be implying but these days they'd be down on him like a ton of bricks. My plea to otherwise great songwriters like G O'S is : Get yourself a literate lyricist. The words matter. Even if you think they don't, some of us do. Ian Chippett -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 21:24:55 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Orpheus Art wrote: > I too am leaning towards getting the BMG Best of Orpheus. I was lucky enough to get the 2 CD (all 4 LPs) set that came out on the Italian label Akarma. It seems to have disappeared but it's worth trying to track down, I think. The Best of comps are nice but they do leave off some really great, buried LP tracks. One thing I like about the band is that they seem to have changed their sound on every LP. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 16:42:24 EST From: John Fox Subject: Re: Bad Lines > But in this ever-changing world in which we live in... Again hating to correct, but this could actually be grammatically correct as: "But IF this ever changing world in which we're LIVING", which then goes well with the next line "...makes you give in and cry" (or is it "makes you give it a try"?) John Fox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 13:35:35 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Lovin' Spoonful Jerry also produced a Tim Buckley album with Zally of all people. Zally dropped out of the rock and roll scene so he could gain custody of his daughter. That explains why he never came around to tour. Got to see him on the last night of my honeymoon when my wife and I went to Chez Piggie. Only wish I'd brought an album along for him to sign. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 22:00:56 -0000 From: Bob Subject: Re: Snuff Garrett Clark: > In reading all the Snuff Garrett info, didn't he have that little > hand written drawing of himself on records he produced? Am I > thinking of someone else? Clark, There was a caricature drawing of Snuff on all of the Snuff Garrett productions for a time. Bob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 14:02:15 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Bad Lines / Good Lines Whenever I used to hear Sam Cooke's "Cupid" and the lines, "I know with your help her heart I could steal................Help me if you will"........I would cringe!! Now I find them endearing. In the 60s, it was common for one songwriter to play their latest song to another. Carole King and I were waiting at Nevins-Kirschner publishing [on seperate appointments]....she asked me if I wanted to hear what she and Gerry Goffin had just written. She sat down and played what are some of the best lines ever written........... "Tonight you're mine completly...........You give your love so sweetly ..............tonight the light of love is in your eyes........but, Will You Love Me Tomorrow? Carole went in to see Donnie Kirshner before I did...........I heard him screaming, "It's a SMASH!!! It's a F#*%$!N Smash!!! I assumed he liked it too. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 14:45:38 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Snuff Garrett & "Strings" Bob.........How ya' doin? I agree that the strings that Snuff used on Bobby Vee, Johnny Burnette and Gene McDaniels [usually arranged by Ernie Freeman or Al Capps] were remarkable. I always considered those soaring, melodic string parts as much of a hook as anything else in his records. And speaking of Snuff Garrett.......I'm going to ask him to verify where "3000 Miles" by Brian Hyland [which he produced and I wrote] was cut. I played guitar on the date in N.Y..... though many Spectro-doubters argue that it was cut in L.A. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 14:22:01 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Crooners Phil.........How ya' doin'? Wouldn't you consider Elvis a sometime crooner ["Can't Help Falling in Love"]? I don't believe it was a mike technique that defined a crooner. It was a romantic song delivered by a sensual [usually baritone] voice....Como, Crosby and Martin for example. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 17:27:51 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Bad Lines & Rhymes Phil wrote: > "And no one heard at all, > Not even the chair." > > --Neil D., I Am What I Am, I Said Bad it may be, but it's Shakespeare next to: "Songs she sang to me Songs she brang to me..." -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:38:27 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Bad Lines Rex Strother wrote: > From "She Believes in Me" - Kenny Rogers: > "I try to get undressed without the light" > And how hard was that, Kenny? Were you afraid the > chair was listening? But that line created my favorite Dickie Goodman moment in "Energy Crisis ('74?)" in answer to the question as to what some government official was doing to try to save energy! Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 23:50:19 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Bobby Shafto Larry Lapka wrote: > On another subject: I don't even know if their music > fits in here, but does anyone have any information on > a group called Bobby Shafto? I think they had a mild > hit in the late 1960s, but I can't recall off the top > of my head. I know that he is British. I have 8 singles by him, all of them pretty good. I think that only 2 of them came out here and the rest were from the UK. One song charted at the bottom of the Top 100. No other info on who Bobby Shafto is. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 17:52:29 EST From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Bad rhymes/bad grammar My Neil Diamond "brang" example prompted me to revisit a subset of this lyrical discussion...really bad grammar. No one will fault a songwriter for simple subject/verb disagreement (i.e., "He don't love you like I love you") or a double negative ("Don't want you no more") in the service of the vernacular. But herewith, three of my favorite examples of lyrics that play TOO fast and loose with the language, to the point that they don't make sense: "(Johnny) No he'll never do (Bobby) No it isn't him, too" -- "Walking in the Rain," Ronettes "I been a rambler and a gambler And I guess I always will" -- "Heard It in a Love Song," Marshall Tucker Band ("will" what? There's no antecedent for this verb!) "I've just got to know Do you love him Or just makin' time?" -- "Smoke from a Distant Fire," Sanford-Townsend Band (Some have suggested this means "Do you love him or do you just love to make time?" But I'm not buying it. My ear "stumbles" every time I hear this -- I want to insert "are you" between "or" and "just.") Other nominations? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2003 00:16:34 -0000 From: Monophonius Subject: Aldon Music Staffers 1962 It has been said that Aldon Music had eighteen (18) songwriters working for them in 1962, all twenty-six years of age or younger. I can name most of them, but not all. You know, Goffin, King, Greenfield, Sedaka, Keller, Mann, Weil, Kolber, Miller, et al. Maybe Artie Wayne could come up with a complete list? Thanks -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 19:25:40 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Bad rhymes/bad grammar Mike McKay wrote: > "(Johnny) No he'll never do > (Bobby) No it isn't him, too" > > -- "Walking in the Rain," Ronettes > > "I been a rambler and a gambler > And I guess I always will" > > -- "Heard It in a Love Song," Marshall Tucker Band > > ("will" what? There's no antecedent for this verb!) > > > "I've just got to know > Do you love him > Or just makin' time?" > > -- "Smoke from a Distant Fire," Sanford-Townsend Band Love them...makes next to no sense "Don't call a doctor A nurse is worse 'Cause a pill can't kill my pain When I'm feelin' blue I know just what to do To make me feel alright again" "You're My Remedy" - Marvelettes, written by Smokey Robinson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 19:42:39 -0500 From: Rat Pfink Subject: Re: Bobby Shafto Larry Lapka wrote: > I do seem to remember that (he) got some scant airplay here > in New York on one song, but I just can't recall what the song > was or any information about (him). The song was probably "She's My Girl", it made #86 on the Cashbox charts in July of 1964. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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