The Spectropop Group Archives
presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 1149



________________________________________________________________________
      
               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
________________________________________________________________________



There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Dreck in the charts
           From: Michael Fishberg 
      2. Re: UK hitmakers, US flops
           From: Michael Lynch 
      3. UK hitmakers, US flops
           From: Michael Edwards 
      4. Re: Layng Martine
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      5. Re: Cincinnati/Two of Clubs
           From: Clark Besch 
      6. Re: UK hitmakers, US flops  -- Cliff Richard
           From: Herb 
      7. Hanukkah and Other Things ...
           From: Lapka Larry 
      8. Re: UK hitmakers, US flops
           From: Tom Taber 
      9. Re: Octavian
           From: Clark Besch 
     10. Simultaneous No 1s
           From: Paul Bryant 
     11. Re: Layng Martine
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Re: These Boots Are Made For Talkin'
           From: Ken Mortimer 
     13. Lulu
           From: Lapka Larry 
     14. Re: Harumi
           From: Art Longmire 
     15. The first song to use a synthesizer -- Phil Spector soundalike Christmas songs
           From: Justin McDevitt 
     16. My two scents.
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     17. Re: Me About Gordon & Bonner
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     18. Re: Streaming radio; Sam Cooke; "Me About You"; me about me
           From: Shawn 
     19. Re: Hava Na Presley / centerhole
           From: Phil Milstein 
     20. Sedaka
           From: Alan Gordon 
     21. Re: Cincinnati
           From: Nick Archer 
     22. Re: Cincinnati / Tom Wilson
           From: Phil Milstein 
     23. Charlotte Russe
           From: Mark T 
     24. Re: Cincinnati
           From: Paul Balser 
     25. Re: The first song to use a synthesizer
           From: Mike Rashkow 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Message: 1 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 00:54:39 -0800 (PST) From: Michael Fishberg Subject: Re: Dreck in the charts Richard Havers wrote: > The crooners metamorphosed into Robson and Jerome! > 'Unchained Melody' and 'I Believe' spent a total of > eleven weeks at No.1 in 1995. Surely biggest Dreck song was DRECK OF CARDS by Wink Martindale. This surfaces around this time of year on UK radio stations. NOT the sort of thing that gets played too often to the "coalition forces" (whatever that may mean) I'll wager in Eye-Raq eaither.. Michael Fishberg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 14:51:43 -0000 From: Michael Lynch Subject: Re: UK hitmakers, US flops > I think I heard that the first single to be number one in > both countries simultaneously was "Get Off Of My Cloud". > I have no way of knowing if that's erroneous. Anybody? Simultaneous US/UK Number Ones that preceded it: Cathy's Clown Can't Buy Me Love Baby Love I Feel Fine You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' I Got You Babe Source: http://svc403.bne025u.server-web.com/menziesera/index.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 15:29:34 -0000 From: Michael Edwards Subject: UK hitmakers, US flops Peter McDonnell writes: > A casual glance at singles chart lists of big British hitmakers who > did nada Stateside shows Cliff Richard as the all time leader, with > nearly 65 top 20 singles in Britain between 1958 and 1983,( four of > which made top 20 in the US); the Shadows had 24 top 20 hits in the > UK from 1960 through 1980, none of them hits here; Slade, The Small > Faces, Status Quo, The Move, The Jam, Shakin' Stevens, Showaddywaddy > (who?), Roy Wood, all show up as doing big things there and not much > here. An interesting observation, Peter; I wonder if you could offer some thoughts as to why these artists did so poorly in the US. Given their considerable UK chart success and punk/new wave leanings, I've always wondered why the Jam didn't show up even once on the US Hot-100. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 10:12:23 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Layng Martine Mark writes: > I would think they would just be happy that anyone cared > enough about someone who barely dented the charts and had > just a few scattered singles released 30-35 years ago that > no one bought. To answer your question, if it was me, unless > I was destitute I would just be happy to have something I did > that long ago being worthy of bootlegging. I don't necessarily disagree with your view in concept, but to see where it leads, click on this: http://lostjukebox.tripod.com/ After lending this fellow all of my old stuff on the expressed offer of putting it together on a CD for his personal use and sending me copies - which he did - I then stumbled across this site and found about 20 of my things on various CDs being offered for sale. Now, his position is that he is only doing it as a service to the musical community and that he barely covers his costs, nobody in their right mind would take the time and put in the effort needed to set this huge project up for no gain. Personally, I didn't care. I found it amusing and altogether positive. Others may not feel the same - and the fact that he never told me about what he was up to in the first place, plus the fact that it took me a year and some very strong threats to get back my originals, made the experience less than wonderful. In fact, I was pissed royal about being misled. I'm glad he was not able to handle the reel-to-reel tapes - some of those have never been released and just maybe will have a use someday. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 15:40:57 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Cincinnati/Two of Clubs > John's note about Rusty York, in which he spoke of a Cincinnati > studio, made me wonder how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I > know of Bobby Bare and Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me > I've heard of others but they don't come to mind. Help? > Bobby Helms, Mel Carter, Andy Williams went to school in Cincy > for a while. Fraternity's Two of Clubs were from Cincy. They certainly had a great song "Walk Tall" that went top 10 in many markets, but often at different times of a 5 month run and languished at the bottom of the Hot 100 for it. They also had a handful of other 45s on Fraternity. As far as I know, they still perform in Cincy (at least they were doing so a couple years ago). By the way, anyone ever see the movie listed on the "Walk Tall" 45 that says the song was featured in it? Can't remember the title. A friend said it was a horrible movie, but couldn't remember if the song was in it or the group at all. Just curious. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 16:34:03 -0000 From: Herb Subject: Re: UK hitmakers, US flops -- Cliff Richard Peter McDonnell wrote: > A casual glance at singles chart lists of big British > hitmakers who did nada Stateside shows Cliff Richard > as the all time leader, with nearly 65 top 20 singles > in Britain between 1958 and 1983, (four of which made > top 20 in the US); Hi, I would like to point out that Cliff Richard did quite well on Canada's CHUM chart (I don't know if that speaks nationally) but CHUM has been regarded as comparable to a degree to Billboard. Cliff Richard charted from 1959 to 1981 (Living Doll - Give A Little Bit More). The following were top ten hits: The Young Ones #6 Bachelor Boy #2 Summer Holiday/Dancing Shoes #1 Lucky Lips #8 It's All In The Game #1 Devil Woman #3 We Don't Talk Any More #2 Dreaming #7 A Little In Love #2 That said, I was shocked to learn that "Please Mr. Postman" never charted on CHUM. I'm sure it hit in Windsor, Ontario, being so close to Detroit. However, they had two top ten hits with: Playboy #6 and Beechwood 4-5789 #9. Being a fan of The Orlons, I could not understand that their #2 hit in the States "The Wah-Watusi" only reached #11 here. Herb in Toronto -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 09:53:06 -0800 (PST) From: Lapka Larry Subject: Hanukkah and Other Things ... Dear Phil Milstein: Finally, a decent answer to my question. I agree with everything you've said, but I have to add in an extra two cents. Barbra Streisand's most recent album of film tunes just went gold. The woman has had nothing but gold and platinum records for nearly 40 years now. My wife is a big Streisand fan, and by her estimation, the new album, and for that matter her previous album, "stunk." I am sure that my wife is not the only person that feels this way. Nonetheless, people will buy Barbra Streisand no matter what she sings. Thus, I don't feel a Hanukkah album by her would make the people at her label throw fits. You would get people of all denominations to buy it. I get offended when people say that Streisand (with Yentl) and Neil Diamond (with the Jazz Singer) have already recorded their jewish (again the lower-case j) albums. Heck, if Britney Spears recorded The Dreidel Song and it was released to the general public, don't you think they would buy it (I won't argue about the quality of such a recording, but I think most of you get my point). Yes, Mr. Torme was Jewish. As was/is Kathie Lee Gifford (nee Epstein), who has recorded numerous Christmas and Christian-oriented works over the last several years. Again, I'm not vouching for quality here. I was friendly with Neil Sedaka's nephew, Marc, when I was growing up in Queens, New York during the 1960s and early 1970s. We lived in a housing development in South Jamaica, and (I never got this straight) either Neil's mother (my friend's grandmother) or another relative related to Neil lived right below us. She was of Turkish/Jewish descent, and every Friday was obviously the day to cook. Her kitchen was right under our bathroom, and on Friday's my sister and I knew to use our bathroom sparingly (I think you get what I mean). On another subject, the Robbs do deserve a career-spanning retrospective. Their music is still falling through the cracks nearly 40 years after the fact. I guess we can blame, at least in part, Dick Clark, who like his British counterpart Dave Clark, refuses to release anything (or with Dick Clark, much of anything) that he owns to the general public. Alas, I feel that until Where the Action Is is released in some form, the Robbs will just be a memory to most of us. Again, sorry to be long winded, but I have the pipes for it. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 06:48:01 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: UK hitmakers, US flops Don't forget "Tiger Feet" by Mud, one of my all-time faves. And I will always pine for the parallel universe in which the Kinks' "Waterloo Sunset" is a smash in both countries. Both it and "Autumn Almanac" got airplay in Buffalo, and I was amazed when I got a Whitburn book for Christmas 1972 to see that neither had hit the U.S. charts! Then to see "W.S." go through the indignity of being rereleased as a "B" side to "King Kong," the former "B" side to the bomb-er-oo-nie "Plastic Man"! Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 15:42:55 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Octavian Me: > Mark, I can't tell you how great I felt when I first heard > "Good Feeling To Know" by Octavian while DXing in 75 off CHUM! > I searched for the 45 and found it at the bottom of a junk shop > 2 ft x 2 ft box of 45s about 5 years later! Talk about a great > find! A friend ran down their LP in Florida for me a few years > later. Great pop rock! Even more interesting was dropping the > phasing on the LP version of the song. If these guys had more > output like that LP, I too would love to hear it!! Mark: > They also had a later single called I Can't Stop Myself from Loving > You, a great pop song which is a cover of an Australian hit by > William Shakespeare from 1973. Excellent group. Cool! I'll watch for it! Was it on MCA? Released in USA? Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 10:56:31 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Simultaneous No 1s Peter McDonnell wrote: > I think I heard that the first single to be number > one in both countries simultaneously was "Get Off Of My Cloud". > I have no way of knowing if that's erroneous. Anybody? This here book - The Warner Guide to UK & US Hit Singles - gives Guy Mitchell's Singin' the Blues as the first simultaneous No 1 in January 1957. In the UK it beat the local cover by the egregious Tommy Steele. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 16:04:44 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Layng Martine Clark Besch: > It is certainly a possiblity that those Date sides could show > up on a legit comp someday, thus garnering a small royalty, so > it is likely a little bit of money and more likely, the point > that someone else is making money and the actual artist isn't. > Same old story, I'm afraid. Anyway, it is often a touchy subject, > and I can see your side, my side, Lyang's son's side. Who is > right, I dunno...... Mark: > Not likely. Under what guise? The best of Layng Martine box? The > Date records story - all of the non-hits? Let's be realistic, it's > a kneejerk reaction not at all based in reality. Kind of like Andy > Kim killing the best of project that Universal had prepared on him. > Didn't want it released because he considers himself "a current > artist". Yeah, he and Bobby Sherman are both really hot today! But > getting back to the original issue, I would think they would just > be happy that anyone cared enough about someone who barely dented > the charts and had just a few scattered singles released 30-35 > years ago that no one bought. To answer your question, if it was me, > unless I was destitute I would just be happy to have something I did > that long ago being worthy of bootlegging. Mark, most of the time I might agree with your philosophy, but Layng is still quite active today and with his posiion in music, might have a legit reason for protecting his music. He is one of a 13 member board governing the Nashville Songwriters Foundation and works a lot with the country music field today. His legacy as presented on that foundation's site is fairly impressive actually. It could be enough to garner a "Works of Layng Martine, Jr." someday?? It reads: "Layng Martine, Jr. arrived in Nashville in 1972 from Connecticut. Learning his craft from publisher Ray Stevens, Layng's first major success, "Rub It In" by Billy "Crash" Craddock, reached #1 Country and #16 Pop in 1972 (and has since become the long-running TV commercial "Plug It In"). In 1977, his "Way Down" became a gold single for Elvis Presley and was #1 on the day Elvis died. Layng's "The Greatest Man I Never Knew" was #1 and Grammy-nominated in 1992 and culminated a string of Reba McEntire singles which had begun with her very first in 1976 and included "I Don't Think Love Ought To Be That Way" (#13 in1981). His "Should I Do It' reached #7 Pop for the Pointer Sisters in 1982, and Layng has had #1 Pop singles in both England and France, among other countries. The `90s also brought Country hits such as "I Was Blown Away" by Pam Tillis (#10 in 1995) and "I Wanna Go Too Far" by Trisha Yearwood (#4 in 1996). COMPOSITIONS: "Rub It In" / "The Greatest Man I Never Knew" / "Way Down" / "I Wanna Go Too Far" / "Should I Do It" / "I Was Blown Away" / "I Don't Think Love Ought To Be That Way". Actually, his best song for us Spectropoppers might be "I Can Hear the Rain", an RCA single for Reparata & Delrons and my fave version, Brian Hyland's B side of "Joker Went Wild". Anyway, he is still a pretty successful artist/writer. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 22:00:15 -0000 From: Ken Mortimer Subject: Re: These Boots Are Made For Talkin' Steve Harvey: > Actually their name came from the original Mrs. Peel, > Honor Blackman, who had a record out at the time called > "Kinky Boots". Ray and Dave, ever the dedicated slaves > of fashion. Actually, Honor Blackman played Mrs Cathy Gale. It was Diana Rigg who played Mrs Peel. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 10:12:50 -0800 (PST) From: Lapka Larry Subject: Lulu I saw Lulu in concert at Palisades Amusement Park in probably about 1966 or maybe 1967. She did not sing "To Sir With Love", but she did sing the flip, "The Boat That I Row". To this day, I love both sides, and, in fact, when my mother bought my sister and I the single, I know that the first side that I played was the B side. As for Hanukkah songs, the late-lamented WNEW-FM created its own a few years ago. They took the Elvis Costello song "Veronica", used a soundalike, and created "It's Hanukkah". I don't think this was ever officially released, but if anybody has a copy, please make it available. It's better than you think it is. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 22:22:23 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Harumi Art Longmire says: > I have a double LP by the Japanese artist Harumi (he just went > by one name) that was produced by Tom Wilson on the Verve label > in 1968. I'd definitely be interested in hearing from anyone > else who has this LP and what you think of it. Stewart Mason: > I have this album as well. I haven't listened in some time, but I > recall it as being a perfectly credible early example of jazz-rock > fusion. It seems like most of the early jazz-rock records are by > people who don't really know one side of the equation very well, so > they're either jazz records covered with tired rock cliches or rock > records with tired jazz cliches. I'd have to sit back down with it > for a while to be sure, but I don't remember Harumi's album having > that problem. Hello Stewart, Interesting to hear Harumi described as jazz-rock, although I guess that could describe his album as well as anything-I actually can trace a number of styles on the first two sides; pop-rock, pop-psych and most songs in the 3 minute range. Then there's sides 3 and 4 with one song on each side -I saw these described in a review as "music to watch your lava lamp by" and I certainly agree! Again, it is interesting to see a seemingly obscure singer able to debut with what seems to be a sprawling, artistically ambitious LP. It seems that Tom Wilson as a producer (whose background was in jazz) consistently gave his artists a great deal of leeway to experiment. I agree with your assesment of jazz-rock. One interesting LP I have in that vein is one by a group called Everything is Everything from 1969-from which came the hit "Witchi-Tai-To" written by group member Jim Pepper. I really love that tune, by the way-it's sort of like an American Indian mantra. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 14:50:49 -0600 From: Justin McDevitt Subject: The first song to use a synthesizer -- Phil Spector soundalike Christmas songs Hello Spectropop, Something tells me that the topic of the first time use of a synthesizer in a rock-oriented song has already been addressed by this venerable group, though what the heck, I'll re-start it. My motivation to pursue the first topic stems from the recent threads concerning the first rock 'n roll and disco songs. In addition, while listening to Tommy James and the Shondells Cellophane Symphony the other night, one of the later tracks included a Moog Synthesizer in the instrumentation. This got me to thinking about the first time a a synthesizer was used in a rock oriented track. Maxwell's Silver Hammer immediately came to mind. However, I then had an aha experience and recalled hearing a song by Dick Hymann and the Electric Eclectics in the spring of 1969 with the title, The Minetaur. The Phil Spector Christmas song soundalike referenced in the subject line is also a potential thread, though I would think that the selections within this genre are limited. Tom Petty's It's Christmas All Over Again, (I believe this is the title) comes to mind. Any others? Justin McDevitt -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 17:17:39 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: My two scents. Rex Strother: > I'm looking for images to help me assemble the definitive > "Johnny Cymbal" website. I've got a lot of data - but few > images. Would anyone who has Johnny material - in all of > his guises (Derek, Milk, Eye-Full Tower, Cymbal and Clinger, > etc.) be willing to scan and send me high-res images of labels, > picture sleeves, articles, anything? I can accept high-res where > I work (up to 60mb mailbox on T3 line), so I'll take whatever folks > are willing to help with. And I'll thank all sources, of courses! Fellow Poppers, The recent post from RStrother, our brother, may have been overlooked in the recent flood of messages. He asked for any help possible with Johnny Cymbal and has had no response. Rex is working on pulling together John's catalog and establishing a website. If you have anything at all that might be of use to him in this work, it would be much appreciated by me, the Cymbal family and the lords of R&R. Thanks. Di la, Rashkovksy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 17:37:38 -0500 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Me About Gordon & Bonner While much deserved attention is given to Alan Gordon's past works, I believe it to be in fair order to herald Alan's present status as a significant creative writer. While, to my ears and sensibilities, having temporarily slipped a bit into Hollywood's Tin Gang Alley during the 80s (who hadn't, me included, for survival sake?), Alan recently demonstrated his profound "now" artistry to me by contributing a key musical idea to Spyderbaby's "Glass Blower" album title track, as well as honoring me with his recently written lyric, "Follow The Dolphin", which, if graced by the apropriate music, has all the earmarks of a deeply moving "classic". Alan may not be bubble-popping anymore, nor futilely trying to fiddle with David Foster's masterful territory, but, in his gained artistic maturity and depth, he will surely rise again, Phoenix-like, to much deserved and respected heights. My salute and enthusiastic support is with him! Rock on Alan! Sincerely, Mark Wirtz -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 22:57:20 -0000 From: Shawn Subject: Re: Streaming radio; Sam Cooke; "Me About You"; me about me > ...but despite the interest in completeness, couldn't we > do without Tommy Leonetti's saccharine "Kumbaya"? I can't stand it either, but the fact that it charted is a feather in the cap for Leonetti. For every song you don't like, there's going to be someone out there that does, and how it charted..I don't know. If being too complete is a downfall, we'll gladly take it! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 17:42:13 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Hava Na Presley / centerhole Glenn wrote: > Carly Simon just released a Christmas album this year. Kenny G also > has a Christmas album. And hey, even Elvis Presley, whose maternal > great grandmother was Jewish, making him, by the laws of the Jewish > religion, Jewish, had a Christmas album! There's no way you can convince me that fried banana & peanut-butter sandwiches are kosher! David Coyle wrote: > never able to listen to it, because the hole in the > record was too small! I finally found a stereo that > the record fit on, and, well, it wasn't particularly > worth the wait. Still an interesting album, though. > Nice bookend for the mid-period stuff I still prefer > over the early doowoppish stuff. A good way to solve this problem is to run down to your local hardware store and pick up a conical file*. It's a fairly long unit (mine is about 12", although for all I know smaller ones are available too), narrow and cylindrical and slightly tapered (narrowing as it goes up), which is serrated along its entire surface. It shouldn't be too expensive. After running back home, slide it inside the centerhole up to the hilt, then coax it up further in with gentle strokes, testing it out periodically as you go (lest you make the hole too big). Works like a charm, and your sweetheart might enjoy helping you out with it, too. --Phil M. *I don't know the proper name for this device, so you'll either have to look for it yourself, or use a lot of hand gestures in trying to describe it to the shop clerk. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 17:00:56 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Sedaka Great price through Collector's Choice Music on the Neil Sedaka Box Set: http://www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=BCD65352 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 19:31:37 -0600 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Cincinnati Previously: > ...how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I know of Bobby Bare and > Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me I've heard of others but > they don't come to mind. Help? Off the top of my head (and in no > particular order), the following at least lived in the greater > Cincinnati area for some time while growing up: John Fox: > The Casinos, Lonnie Mack, Doris Day, Ruby Wright, The Isely Brothers, > Andy Williams, Otis Williams & The Charms, The Dolphins, The Two of > Clubs, Bo Donaldson & The Heywoods, Marty Balin & David Freiberg of > the Jefferson Airplane/Starship, Carl Dobkins, Jr., Bob Braun, Bootsie > Collins, The Lemon Pipers, The Teardrops... > And I'm sure I've forgotten plenty others! How about Adrian Belew? I was in Cincinnati several years ago and read a newspaper article about him jamming with his high school band at their reunion. Nick Archer Check out Nashville's classic radio station SM95 on the web at http:/www.live365.com/stations/nikarcher -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 18:38:14 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Cincinnati / Tom Wilson on Cincy cingers: Wasn't Rosemary Clooney from there, also? Andrew Hickey wrote: > It seems, really, that Wilson was the best kind of producer - when he > had a great singer/songwriter with no clear idea of how the record > should sound, he could create the sound to show off the song best (eg > his work with Dylan and S&G), and when he was with people who had very > clear ideas about the sound of their recordings (eg Zappa, VU) he'd let > them do their stuff with the minimum of interference and try to keep > the record company out of their hair... Richie Unterberger delivers a learned treatise on Wilson's career, and makes some interesting points on the depth of his influence on the progress of rock music in the mid-1960s, at the All Music Guide site. His conclusion is particularly right on. The link I found for the article is a repro from MSN: http://entertainment.msn.com/artist/?artist=714995. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 01:27:00 -0000 From: Mark T Subject: Charlotte Russe Anyone have info on this male/female group [Charlotte Russe] with 2 excellent singles on Philips? Or for that matter, Giant Sunflower (Ode), Society's Children (Atco), Golden Bough (A&M), or The Underground (Mainstream). There's nowhere to find out about this unknown, non-charted groups that they put out some excellent singles and then disappeared. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 21:23:06 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time) From: Paul Balser Subject: Re: Cincinnati > John's note about Rusty York, in which he spoke of a Cincinnati > studio, made me wonder how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I > know of Bobby Bare and Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me > I've heard of others but they don't come to mind. Help? Also from Cincinnati: Teardrops, Us Too Group, Casinos, Bo Donaldson & The Heywoods. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 22:26:50 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: The first song to use a synthesizer Justin: > Any others? Well, yes. I have previously laid claim to have been the first (working along with the notorious Ms. Eleanor Greenwich) to use a Moog Synthesizer on a contemporary record; the Fuzzy Bunnies' "No Good To Cry". It was Decca 732537 (7-121,271) if anyone wants to date it. The details are in the archives. Walter Sear programmed the synth. Ron Frangipane played the parts. No one knew what a synth was and it was unique enough that we credited Sear and Frangipane on the label. At the time of my original claim, I was shot down--and I shut up about it. I don't know if I was first, second or third, but I do know it was very early and it took hours to get a sound out of the thing. Shortly after that I used it as effects on a Jean Shepherd comedy album. The only thing I had heard earlier was Switched On Bach, which notwithstanding the 30 something years since that was done, remains the best work ever on a synthesizer; in my less than humble opinion. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.