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Spectropop - Digest Number 1147



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 24 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Aliled 
      2. Robbs & WRIT
           From: Clay Stabler 
      3. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Jon Adelson 
      4. Re: Tom Wilson
           From: Phil Milstein 
      5. Re: Memfist
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
      6. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Larry Lapka 
      7. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Steve Harvey 
      8. Tom Wilson
           From: Steve Harvey 
      9. Guess I'm Dumb
           From: Susan 
     10. Re: Bootlegs
           From: Mark 
     11. Re: Liz Damon and the  Orient Express
           From: Steve Harvey 
     12. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Roger Smith 
     13. Re: Dreck in the charts
           From: Paul Bryant 
     14. Re; Kathy McCord
           From: Francesc Sole 
     15. Re: Cincinnati
           From: Phil Milstein 
     16. Re: Andy Kim / Baron Longfellow
           From: Mark 
     17. Re: Layng Martine
           From: Clark Besch 
     18. Re: Cincinnati
           From: Paul Balser 
     19. Re: Octavian
           From: Mark 
     20. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Paul Bryant 
     21. Re: Tom Wilson / Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Phil Milstein 
     22. Re: Liz Damon and the  Orient Express
           From: Art Longmire 
     23. Re: UK hitmakers, US flops
           From: Peter McDonnell 
     24. Re: House Of The Rising Sun
           From: David Coyle 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 13:40:23 -0800 (PST) From: Aliled Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year > Why is there a dearth of Hannukah songs in popular music--whether > it be rock and roll, pop, or any other manifestation of the two? > Now, of course, in the United States, that's really a bunch of > nonsense. It is the major holiday of the year, especially for kids, > and if it has become something of a "jewish" (yes, I did lowercase > that j) Christmas, that's the way it is. Maybe in your neck of the woods, but most Jews I know hold to the "it's not a big holiday" idea, even if their kids get (or they, when they were kids, got) a few presents. It seems that was primarily a way of sidestepping issues of envy towards the kids who did celebrate Christmas. Less than 1.9% of the US population is Jewish (based on current census numbers and the following): http://www.jewishla.org/news/html/populationdrop.html By most reasonable estimates there are anywhere from a few percentage points more Muslims in America than Jews to roughly 60% more Muslims than Jews in America. So a more apt question might be, why no Ramadan tunes? ;) In essence, you're asking why the bulk of the American population doesn't care much about a holiday that only 1.9% population might celebrate, one which many of that small number consider a lesser holiday (than say, Passover or Yom Kippur). I think the answer's self-evident. (Again, a more apt question might be, why no rockin' Yom Kippur tunes?) > More to my point: with all the major talents in the recording > industry who are Jewish, why do Jews release Christmas albums? Why > do Jewish performers not acknowledge that their holiday is as > special as Christmas. 1) For many Christians, Christmas is THE holiday (on a religious basis), and the basis of sheer consumerism, it's certainly the biggest holiday in the United States. Hannukah isn't one of the bigger holidays for Jews (on a religious basis), that'd be Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year. In fact, my neighbor next door (who's Jewish, so I asked him) adds that Hannukah is definitely considered a second-tier Jewish holiday as it was added to the Jewish calendar "after the fact" and isn't mentioned in the Torah. In essence, Hannukah isn't as special to Jews as Christmas is to Christians, at least not in a strictly religious sense. 2) Christmas has become dereligionized to an extent, becoming the de facto "winter" holiday in the US, so it makes sense as a vehicle for songs to the masses in a way that Hannukah (still a specifically Jewish holiday) does not. I'd venture to say that Christmas has more to do with Santa bringing gifts to kids in most people's eyes than it does the birth of Jesus, so in that sense it's probably less problematic to propagate as a holiday for everyone. Easter's undergoing a separate sort of reinterpretation, becoming more of a bunny-bringing-candy thing than about the resurrection of Jesus . . . oddly sort of returning to its pagan origins. 3) Sell records to nearly 100% of the population or just to 1.9% of the population? Most of the Jewish Christmas singers you mention became well-known partially because they pandered to the biggest numbers possible - so there's your answer there. > Jews have written some of the most wonderful Christmas songs of > all that we hear every year (Mel Torme, Irving Berling among those > writers). However, as a Jew with children, it is getting harder and > harder every year to be virtually the outsider looking in, so to > speak. I feel for you there, it's tougher to fight the onslaught of Christmas mania every year, whether your reasons are religious or anti-commercial or for plain old reasons of sanity! On the other hand, I looked up the lyrics for "Chesnuts Roasting On An Open Fire" and "White Christmas" (by the fab writers you mention) and noticed that (on those two songs at least), there's nothing at all "religious" in either, save the word "Christmas", which made me think that you could probably throw a pretty rocking holiday party with "traditional" songs that don't mention Jesus (or even Christmas) - "Jingle Bells", "Winter Wonderland" and so on. At one point in the early '90s, 07 of the 10 all-time best-selling Christmas albums were by Jewish performers - Neil Diamond, Barbra Streisand (one of them had two on the list), Kenny G, Barry Manilow, Phil Spector (not strictly the "artist", but I think we all file that album under his name - we all do own it, don't we?), and one other I can't recall. At one, point, the top four all-time best-selling Christmas albums were recorded by Jewish artists! Personally, I love the irony in that and was sad to see the likes of Garth Brooks and other more recent non-Jews destroy this humorous bit of trivia. I went to a grade-school "holiday" concert and was surprised to hear a Kwanza song, *two* Hannukah songs and even a Ramadan song. The real irony? It was a Catholic grade school! So maybe, things are changing. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:31:57 -0500 From: Clay Stabler Subject: Robbs & WRIT Mark wrote: > What are these 2 WRIT tracks you speak of? I compiled my own Robbs > CDR with all of the singles plus the album. Is WRIT a label they > recorded a single on? Or a radio station? WRIT was indeed a Milwaukee radio station which issued compilation EPs from time to time. In 1968 they issued an EP (W'R-IT 1340) with "You Got Your Troubles" and "Louie Louie" by the Robbs along with "Debbie On My Mind" by the Tygers and "Small Town Girl" by the Skunks. Don't know the specifics on any other releases. A scan of the Robbs side of the WRIT EP is in the Photos section of the Yahoo! louie-louie group. Let me know if you'd like a copy of the scan via e-mail. Clay S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 21:24:58 -0000 From: Jon Adelson Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Paul Bryant wrote: > Mrs Brown is OK but why anyone, even teenyboppers, bought Henery > the Eighth is beyond me. Perhaps because it was easy to remember the second verse. Jon Adelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:49:20 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Tom Wilson Art Longmire wrote: > It was the very intriguing Tom Wilson, a black staff producer > at Columbia and Verve (among others). I am extremely interested > in Wilson, since he had a hand in many great recordings, including > the first Velvet Underground and Mothers of Invention albums, as > well as being the initial producer on Dylan's "Highway 61" LP. Besides his rock C.V. Wilson also had some great credentials as a jazz producer, including the first couple of Sun Ra albums, released on Wilson's own label (name of which escapes me at the mo') shortly after graduating Harvard. Wilson was more a motivational type of producer than a great musical or engineering talent. Lacking an identifiable sound of his own, his records instead demonstrate imaginative ideas and constructions that adeptly serve the respective artist's style. While a staff producer at MGM (Verve's parent at the time) c.1968 he did a series of radio programs, entitled "The Music Factory," in which he'd interview an MGM recording artist while spinning theirs' and others of the label's new releases. In the guise of a hip syndicated show, these were in fact sheer promo. His Music Factory segment with John Cale and Lou Reed is commonly available on bootlegs, and provides a wonderful glimpse at Wilson's hip intellectual persona (read: he sounds completely stoned!). I've always pictured him as the ultimate target audience of the Playboy Advisor: black turtlenecks, great hi-fi rig, shag carpet, Couvoisier and mood lighting. Back in my "Lost & Found" days at WMBR I did an hour-long special on Wilson, including a pastiche I'd made segueing the acoustic original version of Sounds Of Silence into Wilson's folk-rock recreation. While the edit was hardly seamless, it still came out pretty good. If there is any interest in hearing it, would this be acceptable for musica? --Phil M. P.S. I realize I was the one who'd asked who produced the S.O.S. overdubs, yet here I am suggesting I'd known the answer all along. The fact is that I'd always heard it to have been Wilson, but became uncertain recently after reading, in authoritative-seeming sources, other names inserted in place of his for that role. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 21:15:48 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Memfist Steve Harvey wrote: > There was a funny dj bit (Imus maybe?) where this dj called > information and just said the lyrics to the bewildered operator > in reply to her questions ("I'll need more info than that, sir.") That sounds like "Ma Bell You Got Me By The Calls" by Joey Reynolds, issued on the Pyramid label. I used to play that one on the air, believe it or not (college radio, of course). Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:11:54 -0000 From: Larry Lapka Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year Simon White: > Bit off topic really, but this mornings re-run of "Bewitched" > (I can't do anything in the morning before three cups of coffee > and half an hour with Samantha Stevens) was a Christmas edition. > > The Stevens and the Kravitzes each take home an orphan for > the Christmas holidays and give them the full tree/present/ > Santa schtick - despite the seemingly obvious fact that Gladys > and Abner Kravitz's are... Jewish. > > It's a particularly bad episode. Yes, Judaism is often used as a plot device, and nothing more, on TV. It is particularly sad. More on the topic, Peggy Lee did a good rendition of the Bewitched theme song years ago. I have it, and it worth looking for. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 13:50:17 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures > "Henry the Eighth" The song's line "Second verse, same as the > first!" became a catch-phrase with the kids in my neighborhood > in Dayton, Ohio. The reason behind the repeat of the second verse was the Hermits' version is only part of original music hall tune. I think Herman just used the chorus and neglected the main verse. I remember hearing it the first time on Crazy College. You wouldn't recognize the tune when it started. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 13:54:52 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Tom Wilson Tom Wilson seems to hit extremes with people. I remember John Cale talking about Wilson producing the first Velvets lp. Seemed he was too busy with various female interests to put in any real time on the Velvets' efforts. Got the feeling that they produced it and had his name attached since he was the hot shot producer of Simon, Garfunkel and Zimmerman at that point. As for Zappa, Wilson based his signing them on hearing their folkrock epic, Trouble Coming Everyday, which was about the Watts riot and race relations. Heard them play live at some club. Of course, little did he know what he was really getting into. None of their other stuff came close to that tune. Surprise! Surprise!! as Gomer would say. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:32:51 -0500 From: Susan Subject: Guess I'm Dumb Steve Harvey wrote: > Not to mention, "Guess I'm Dumb", did nothing for Glen Campbell > over in the UK. I don't think it did much for him in the US, either! Susan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:26:20 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Bootlegs > What a shame, as Sony owns some really great hard to find > stuff, like the entire Mainstream Catalog, which they bought > in the 70s. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that most of the > execs at Sony in the catalogue dept DONT EVEN KNOW what they > really own....and dont really care because what they do know > are the top sellers like The Byrds and Springsteen and Paul > Simon and Billy Joel. This is why bootlegs are the only way we will ever hear this stuff. The labels won't bother going after anyone because A) They don't even know what they own anyway and B) It's not costing them anything as they would never issue the material anyway so why waste any money on legal costs. What I don't understand are companies like Warners and Universal which charge a ridiculous licensing fee, making it impossible for them to do. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 14:01:40 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Liz Damon and the Orient Express What was the second Liz Damon's Orient Express album on White Whale? I have the first with 1900, but never saw a second. However, I do have ger Cartan Tours presents lp . . . a bonus gift lp for their customers. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 18:57:08 -0500 From: Roger Smith Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year > More to my point: with all the major talents in the recording > industry who are Jewish, why do Jews release Christmas albums? Because Christmas music sells a lot better? :-) > Why do Jewish performers not acknowledge that their holiday > is as special as Christmas. Although Chanukah has interesting stories associated with it and some fun traditions and songs, it's really a relatively minor holiday. It just gets more attention, especially in the US, because it occurs near Christmas each year. It never really bothered me that Neil Diamond, Barbra Streisand, and others have recorded Christmas albums. They're nice songs and the singers bring something to the performances. -- Roger -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 13:33:28 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Dreck in the charts Paul Bryant wrote: > Makes me wonder if all the crooners died, or if it was their > audience which all died, because I can't remember the same > phenomenon in the 80s or 90s. Richard Havers; > The crooners metamorphosed into Robson and Jerome! > > 'Unchained Melody' and 'I Believe' spent a total of eleven weeks > at No.1 in 1995. You're so horribly right - this proves that in Britain the crooning tendency lurks just below the surface, waiting to emerge the moment we let out guard slip. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:49:51 -0000 From: Francesc Sole Subject: Re; Kathy McCord Country Paul wrote: > Does anyone have any further info on the record or Kathy McCord? Oh, that question made me step out from my long lurkerdom. A couple of months ago I found an Lp by Kathy McCord, self-titled, CTI Records, actually a Spanish pressing. From 1970. The two songs you mention are not included in the Lp (I would love to hear them!). It's one of the most rewarding finds for me in recent times. Track list is: Rainbow Ride I'm Leaving Home Candle Waxing Baby James The Love Flow New York Good Sugar/Love Lyric#7 For You, Child Jennipher Take Away This Pain Velvet Smile All songs written by Kathy McCord except for I'm Leaving Home, which is the Lennon-McCartney song, but with the lyrics modified for a girl to sing. Yes, she sings "I'm leaving home after living alone for so many years..." Recorded at Van Gelder Studios Rudy Van Gelder, Engineer Recorded November 18, 19, 20, 24; December 2, 1969 Produced by Creed Taylor. Further research shows this was reissued on cd in Japan sometime ago: Vivid (Jap) VSCD 728 [CD]and describe it as a jazzy record (no way!) Kathy's beautiful voice reminds me a lot of contemporary singer Aimee Mann. This is an excellent folk-rock record, but it also contains very good string and brass arrangements throughout. Rainbow Ride is a magnificent example of this, with her sweet whispering voice gradually leading to a blissful musical explosion. Don't hesitate to pick it up if you see it! I would also love to know what became of her. best! Francesc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 18:22:54 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Cincinnati Dan Hughes wrote: > John's note about Rusty York, in which he spoke of a Cincinnati > studio, made me wonder how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I > know of Bobby Bare and Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me > I've heard of others but they don't come to mind. Help? I believe both Bootsy Collins and Roger and Larry Trout of the Zap Band are from Cincinnati, and I think that Bootsy also had an older brother who preceded him into James Brown's band. Add to that the fact that Harry Carlson, founder of Cincinnati's famed Fraternity label, grew up in Funk, Nebraska, and I think you have at least the sideways makings of a funk haven. Carlson, by the way, was said to have been one suave MF -- the polar opposite, in other words, of his crosstown rival, Syd Nathan of King Records. But I digress -- getting back to the topic, The Casinos were also from Cincinnati. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:19:21 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Andy Kim / Baron Longfellow Laura Pinto: > I recently won auctions on two Baron Longfellow albums from > eBay. Baron Longfellow, for the uninitiated, is actually > Andy Kim, a rose by another name smelling just as sweet. > The first album, from 1981, is self-titled, the second, from > 1984, is called "Prisoner By Design." Just curious but does he do any good bubblegum on the LPs or is it all singer-songwriter mush? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:16:57 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Layng Martine Clark Besch: > It is certainly a possiblity that those Date sides could show > up on a legit comp someday, thus garnering a small royalty, so > it is likely a little bit of money and more likely, the point > that someone else is making money and the actual artist isn't. > Same old story, I'm afraid. Anyway, it is often a touchy subject, > and I can see your side, my side, Lyang's son's side. Who is > right, I dunno...... Not likely. Under what guise? The best of Layng Martine box? The Date records story - all of the non-hits? Let's be realistic, its a kneejerk reaction not at all based in reality. Kind of like Andy Kim killing the best of project that Universal had prepared on him. Didn't want it released because he considers himself "a current artist". Yeah, he and Bobby Sherman are both really hot today! But getting back to the original issue, I would think they would just be happy that anyone cared enough about someone who barely dented the charts and had just a few scattered singles released 30-35 years ago that no one bought. To answer your question, if it was me, unless I was destitute I would just be happy to have something I did that long ago being worthy of bootlegging. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 17:30:28 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time) From: Paul Balser Subject: Re: Cincinnati > John's note about Rusty York, in which he spoke of a Cincinnati > studio, made me wonder how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I > know of Bobby Bare and Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me > I've heard of others but they don't come to mind. Help? Bobby Helms, Mel Carter, Andy Williams went to school in Cincy for awhile. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 22:41:13 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Octavian > Mark, I can't tell you how great I felt when I first heard > "Good Feeling To Know" by Octavian while DXing in 75 off CHUM! > I searched for the 45 and found it at the bottom of a junk shop > 2 ft x 2 ft box of 45s about 5 years later! Talk about a great > find! A friend ran down their LP in Florida for me a few years > later. Great pop rock! Even more interesting was dropping the > phasing on the LP version of the song. If these guys had more > output like that LP, I too would love to hear it!! They also had a later single called I Can't Stop Myself from Loving You, a great pop song which is a cover of an Australian hit by William Shakespeare from 1973. Excellent group. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 14:53:19 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Steve Harvey wrote: > Not to mention, "Guess I'm Dumb", did nothing for Glen Campbell > over in the UK. Nor in America either. But it might be due for a revival in his future live shows. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 18:56:01 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Tom Wilson / Hannukah is My Time of Year Steve Harvey wrote: > Tom Wilson seems to hit extremes with people. I remember John Cale > talking about Wilson producing the first Velvets lp. Seemed he was > too busy with various female interests to put in any real time on > the Velvets' efforts. Got the feeling that they produced it and > had his name attached since he was the hot shot producer of Simon, > Garfunkel and Zimmerman at that point. Wilson's relationship to the VU went deeper than that. It was he who got them signed to Verve, and oversaw their recordings while there. In fact, when they first hooked up Wilson was still working for Columbia, and it was to that label that Paul Morrissey (Andy Warhol's business mgr. at the time, and later the director of his movies) had hoped to get the band signed. (The bulk of the "banana" album was already in the can, and with Wilson at the helm they added "Sunday Morning," which he produced with an eye toward AM airplay!) But Wilson told them he was about to jump to Verve, and suggested that if they wait until he's situated over there he could get them good care. Ironically, it was probably the later signing of The Mothers that tossed the VU down a peg in Verve's eyes. With the much squeakier wheel Herb Cohen manipulating behind the scenes, The Mothers' debut was put on the fast track, while the Velvets' debut was held back for nearly a year, losing them a good deal of momentum in the process. Aliled wrote: > Personally, I love the irony in that and was sad to see the likes of > Garth Brooks and other more recent non-Jews destroy this humorous bit > of trivia. I wouldn't be so quick to pull the trigger there -- I hear his name originally was Brookenstein! --Phil Mil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 03 Dec 2003 00:04:00 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Liz Damon and the Orient Express Steve Harvey wrote: > What was the second Liz Damon's Orient Express album on White Whale? > I have the first with 1900, but never saw a second. However, I do > have ger Cartan Tours presents lp . . . a bonus gift lp for their > customers. I have the album somewhere and will keep an eye out for it. It seems to be a lot rarer than the first LP (of which I have no less than four copies). I do remember that it consists primarily of covers and after playing it I didn't rate it as highly as the first one, in that there were no standout tracks like "1900 Yesterday" and "You're Falling in Love". The bonus LP you mention sounds interesting, I always like custom LPs of that sort put out by clubs and resorts. I have the Frank Sinatra Cal Neva 45 of "Ring-a-Ding" for instance, as well as a West Indian show band issued by a nightclub, featuring the great reggae/ska guitarist Ernest Ranglin. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:11:36 -0800 From: Peter McDonnell Subject: Re: UK hitmakers, US flops A casual glance at singles chart lists of big British hitmakers who did nada Stateside shows Cliff Richard as the all time leader, with nearly 65 top 20 singles in Britain between 1958 and 1983,( four of which made top 20 in the US); the Shadows had 24 top 20 hits in the UK from 1960 through 1980, none of them hits here; Slade, The Small Faces, Status Quo, The Move, The Jam, Shakin' Stevens, Showaddywaddy (who?), Roy Wood, all show up as doing big things there and not much here. I think I heard that the first single to be number one in both countries simultaneously was "Get Off Of My Cloud". I have no way of knowing if that's erroneous. Anybody? friscopedro -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:15:24 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: House Of The Rising Sun My favorite version of "House Of The Rising Sun" after the Animals is the one by the Sundowners, a UK harmony beat group. I think there was a bit of a challenge over this, as both versions pretty much came out around the same time. Of course, the Sundowners got trounced by the Animals, who were already set to try to conquer America. They apparently decided to work up a version so that they wouldn't be accused of being too much like wannabes when they toured with Chuck Berry. That being said, I really like the Sundowners version, whose lyrics are a bit closer to the Leadbelly original, and the melody is tweaked a bit. It has a more folky sound than the Animals version. It's a lot like the Four Pennies' version of "Black Girl" (aka "In The Pines" or "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?"), but without the big finish. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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