The Spectropop Group Archives presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 1146



________________________________________________________________________
      
               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
________________________________________________________________________



There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: My Girl The Month Of May
           From: Paul Underwood 
      2. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Tony Leong 
      3. Sound of Silence in UK
           From: Tom Waters 
      4. Electric (sounds of) Silence
           From: Kim Cooper 
      5. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Dan Hughes 
      6. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Art Longmire 
      7. Re: Tom Wilson/Harumi
           From: Dan Hughes 
      8. Re: Tunesmith - Jimmy Webb CD
           From: Richard Havers 
      9. Cincinnati
           From: Dan Hughes 
     10. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Paul Bryant 
     11. Re: "Girls' Song"
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Up Up & Away - The songs of Jimmy Webb
           From: Richard Havers 
     13. Re: Canadian Re-issues
           From: Clark Besch 
     14. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Mikey 
     15. Calling All Scanners
           From: Rex Strother 
     16. Dreck in the charts
           From: Paul Bryant 
     17. Re: Liz Damon and the  Orient Express
           From: Clark Besch 
     18. Re: Glen Campbell mugshot/Being There
           From: Clark Besch 
     19. Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs
           From: Clark Besch 
     20. Re: "Girls' Song"
           From: Richard Havers 
     21. Re: Rusty York
           From: John Fox 
     22. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Simon White 
     23. Re: Dreck in the charts
           From: Richard Havers 
     24. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Shawn 
     25. Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Steve Harvey 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Message: 1 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 09:15:43 +0100 From: Paul Underwood Subject: Re: My Girl The Month Of May Dave Heasman wrote: > "My Girl The Month Of May" was the b-side of "Berimbau" and also on > "Dion & The Belmonts Together Again" from 1967. It's a brilliant and > very clever song, just made for Dion, his cracked agonised voice.. The song was included on Dion's 4-CD box set "King of the New York Streets" in 2000. It was a B-side in 1967, but British radio DJ's gave it a lot of airplay at the time, though sales were minimal. The song really has to be heard to be believed! It was written by Dion and had such a dense sound (with echoes of Bob B Soxx's "Zip a dee doo dah") that it made me wish he would work with Phil Spector, which he eventually did. Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 19:19:22 -0000 From: Tony Leong Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Tony: > The biggest US #1 that was a UK flop that I know of was > Lulu's "To Sir With Love"!! Even the movie was a flop in > the UK!!!!!! Michael Fishberg replied: > I'm sure this cannot be right. What is the source of this > info? On which chart(s) is/are the data based? Michael: In the UK at the time, "To Sir With Love" was the B-side to "The Boat That I Row", and THAT was the hit side. Lulu even wrote in her autobiog that at the time, the English weren't interested in another movie about Cockney speaking kids. Go figure!!!! I'm amazed at the number of mid-60s UK #1s that did nothing in the US like the Hollies' "I'm Alive" and Sandie Shaw's "Long Live Love". Well, I think they may have "Bubbled Under" the Hot 100. Tony -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 09:44:19 -0000 From: Tom Waters Subject: Sound of Silence in UK The Sound of Silence was a big hit in the UK in 1966, it hit number 3 in fact, but not the version by Simon and Garfunkel. The popular Irish group the Bachelors (one of my favourite groups) covered it and scored big. I quite like the Bachelors version too (course, I like almost everything they do). Tom -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 11:34:49 -0800 From: Kim Cooper Subject: Electric (sounds of) Silence When I interviewed Jeremy Clyde, he said that Tom Wilson had added the drum track to "Sounds of Silence" while Paul Simon was in London. Kim -- Scram PO Box 461626 Hollywood, CA 90046-1626 http://www.scrammagazine.com Scram #18 out now with Emitt Rhodes, the Ramones, Marty Thau, Smoosh and more. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 14:04:52 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year For a short--and extremely funny--example of a Jew singing Christmas carols, listen to this: http://www.stevegoodie.com/carols.mp3 ---Dan P.S. Steve Goodie is a satirist with several albums out; I personally think he's better than Weird Al. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 20:19:46 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Paul Bryant wrote: > Likewise, Herman's Hermits had 2 American No 1's > which weren't issued as A sides in the UK, Mrs Brown & > I'm Henry the Eighth. Mrs Brown is OK but why anyone, > even teenyboppers, bought Henry the Eighth is beyond > me. I recall "Henry the Eighth" by Herman as being a HUGE hit here...especially with the little girls in my neighborhood. I can remember pushing my best friend's sister on a swing as she sang "I'm Henry the Eighth, I Am!" at window rattling volume. I was eight at the time. The song's line "Second verse, same as the first!" became a catch-phrase with the kids in my neighborhood in Dayton, Ohio. One interesting aspect of the early British Invasion era was that people went crazy over everything British - we had a kid in the neighborhood from England named Graham (who kind of looked like a junior version of Hugh Grant). All the girls were crazy about him and would shout and squeal out his name whenever he walked by. He usually just turned red and tried to ignore them...those were the days! Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 14:08:55 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Tom Wilson/Harumi Art wrote: > I have a double LP by the Japanese artist Harumi (he just went > by one name) that was produced by Tom Wilson on the Verve label > in 1968. I'd definitely be interested in hearing from anyone else > who has this LP and what you think of it. Art, I have the Harumi album and enjoy it immensely. In my college days, I'd put it on when I wanted to go to sleep; it had me snoring in no time. (I don't mean to say it was boring; it was actually "dreamlike" and almost put me into a trance; the esoteric music and that voice talking softly--quickly--in another language). I remember reading an interview with Frank Zappa wherein Zappa said Tom Wilson should be the next President of the United States, and that if this country didn't have its race problem Wilson would have a good chance.... ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 10:18:45 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Tunesmith - Jimmy Webb CD Ken Silverwood wrote: > My golly! That's some track listing. I got an 18 track on Debutante > a few years ago. Among those not on your CD: > Still Within The Sound Of My Voice - Linda Ronstadt > It's A Sin (When You Love Somebody) - Joe Cocker > Someone Is Standing Outside - Thelma Houston > Didn't We - Jimmy Webb > And the magnificent If This Were The Last Song - (Brother) Bill Medley The Debutante CD was a great start on releasing rare JLW tracks, as was the Sequel Cd from a few years back. 'Up Up and Away, the songs of Jimmy Webb' (NEMCD 410) has some pap, but it does contain Buddy Greco's (yes Buddy Greco!) wonderful reading of 'Pocketful of Keys'. It also has the Bystanders 'Pattern People', Unicorn's 'PF Sloan', The Freshmen 'Carpet Man' and Long John Baldry's 'Mac Park'. While the track list on the Raven Cd is superb the booklet notes are not. There are no dates for the tracks, no sources etc. The two essays are not very explicit and in some areas plain confusing. That said It shouldn't put anyone off buying the CD. The new Michael Feinstein/Jimmy Webb album is also out. Called 'Only One Life' it revisits classic JLW songs with the Feinstein touch. It's not everyone's cuppa, but if you like Webb, and are not averse to Feinstein's more traditional vocal stylings then you'll like it. I personally really like the lush orchestrations and the the 'show tune' style. For me it's worth the price for the title track alone Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 14:30:47 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Cincinnati John's note about Rusty York, in which he spoke of a Cincinnati studio, made me wonder how many musicians grew up in Cincy. I know of Bobby Bare and Roy Rogers (the first one); seems to me I've heard of others but they don't come to mind. Help? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 05:24:05 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Mike Edwards wrote: > But then you can extend your argument and wonder why the > above consistent US hit makers made so little impact on > the UK charts. Their total haul of UK hits were: Marvelettes > (1), Gary Lewis & The Playboys (1 in 1975), Association (1), > Buckinghams(0), Tommy James & The Shondells (2). Add to that: > Paul Revere & The Raiders (0), Jay & The Americans (0), Tokens > (1), American Breed (1) and the Young Rascals (2). Phil Milstein wrote: > I wonder how much this phenomenon might owe to the English > penchant for attempting to cover, via homegrown talent, > American releases prior to their hitting big in Britain, in > the hope of gaining the "winning" version. (And yes, I know > this strategy went both ways, but in the period we're talking > about I think it was mostly British covers of American releases.) That's a partial answer - Sound of Silence was covered by The Bachelors, There's always something there to remind me was done by Sandie Shaw, so they had the hit there. But no one covered Windy or Cherish at the time to my knowledge, & certainly didn't get any hits out of them. The crazy British public did let a lot of first-rate American records slip right on by. From (I think) 1965 onward they didn't have the excuse of limited needle time on the BBC because the pirate radio stations were broadcasting 24 hours a day. Then again, I suppose American record buyers failed to go for some great British records too - I mean, they completely ignored The Who until 1967! So we're all guilty!! pb ps - Covers and their success or failure are an interesting topic. I guess the best story was in January 1965 when Cilla Black covered You've Lost that Lovin Feelin'. This so outraged and disgusted Andrew Loog Oldham that he took full-page ads in the music press telling people not to buy Cilla's version! Then again, some few British cover versions are better than the American originals, although I ain't going to tell you which ones, as I think I'd get in a lot of trouble... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:24:41 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: "Girls' Song" Bob Rashkow: > Richard Havers may have solved a riddle that's been bugging > me. "The Girls' Song" by Jackie DeShannon...also recorded > (later?) by the Fifth Dimension? "It's a girls' song, so > don't you boys be singing along...." First heard this one > on Kiddie-A-Go-Go and it would have to be late '67 or early > '68; 5th D's 45 is listed as 1970. Could this have been > Jackie's version Pandora and company were spinning? Richard responded: > The 5th D recorded 'The Girl's Song' for their brilliant > album 'The Magic Garden' in mid to late 1967. It didn't > get a single release until 1970. I think the album came out > at Christmas '67 and charted in mid January. No idea when > Jackie's version was done, but I assume it was post the 5th > D as it has always been said that JLW wrote the Bacharach- > like 'Girl's Song' specifically for Florence and Marilyn. Richard and Bob, the reason for "The Girl's Song" 1970 release as a 45 by the 5D is somewhat two-fold. The 5D had just left their old label, Johnny Rivers' Soul City, and "Girl's Song" was used by Soul City as an after-the-fact "cash in" as often happened in those days(and still does). Released simultaneously with Bell Records'(their new label) "Puppet Man", both great songs failed to reach the positions they likely could have achieved if not battling each other. But, to show how hot that group was at that time, "Girls" still got to #43 and "Puppet Man" #24! Personally, I think "Girl's Song" is one of their best! The second reason for the "Girl's Song" 45 release was its then current use as advertising for Bell telephone (again with Bell?). It was used in commercials at the time and appears on a special Bell advertising LP as the main track. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 20:45:56 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Up Up & Away - The songs of Jimmy Webb Just found the Sequel "Up Up & Away" CD on UK ebay if anyone is interested. I think it may be out of print now. Richard http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2577790410&category=1057 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:49:43 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Canadian Re-issues Mark wrote: > How about The Big Town Boys? Staccatos? Original Caste, > 3s a Crowd, Octavian, Craig Ruhnke, Susan Jacks solo... Mark, I can't tell you how great I felt when I first heard "Good Feeling To Know" by Octavian while DXing in 75 off CHUM! I searched for the 45 and found it at the bottom of a junk shop 2 ft x 2 ft box of 45s about 5 years later! Talk about a great find! A friend ran down their LP in Florida for me a few years later. Great pop rock! Even more interesting was dropping the phasing on the LP version of the song. If these guys had more output like that LP, I too would love to hear it!! Superoldies: > Products are generally released as there is demand. Record > execs don't read these boards and I personally believe (as > much as I LOVE Susan Jacks, etc.) that sales on these acts > would be very limited. After licensing, packaging, etc., you're > really lucky if you break even. That's all I'm hoping with the > JB & The Playboys package too...who hates losing money? > It's true that no one wants to lose money but its a worldwide market > these days and all alot of these things need are good promotion. Are > the groups that Revola is putting out like the Deep Six, Third Rail, > October Country, etc. any more commercial or well-known? At least > these groups were popular in Canada or Japan. Where was Thomas and > Richard Frost popular? With the right push and good word of mouth > these things could sell decently. I was in a store in Sydney where > they sold a bunch of Montanas CDs just by playing them in the store. > The market is there, people just need to be exposed to the music. Hi Shawn, glad to see you're doing good in Minnesota!! It would almost be worth the air fare to fly to Sydney just to hear a record store playing one of my all time faves, the Montanas, in their store!! Great story! I know I've suggested Cds to many a label, and Shawn is not out of line with his comments. However, every once in awhile, there's a label that has a soft spot and a little nudge is all they need. So, don't be discouraged from making suggestios, just don't have expectations! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:49:01 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures "I'm Henry The Eighth" is such a swinging record it's unbelievable. And it doesn't hurt that Jimmy Page's Guitar solo really smokes, along with Clem Cattini's great drumming. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 09:00:06 -0700 From: Rex Strother Subject: Calling All Scanners Hi-Dee-Ho Spectropopists: I'm looking for images to help me assemble the definitive "Johnny Cymbal" website. I've got a lot of data - but few images. Would anyone who has Johnny material - in all of his guises (Derek, Milk, Eye-Full Tower, Cymbal and Clinger, etc.) be willing to scan and send me high-res images of labels, picture sleeves, articles, anything? I can accept high-res where I work (up to 60mb mailbox on T3 line), so I'll take whatever folks are willing to help with. And I'll thank all sources, of courses! Rex Strother -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 05:29:26 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Dreck in the charts Mike Edwards wrote: > [some very good reasons why great American singles > failed in Britain] ...A general Moms and Dads feel to > the UK charts, so guys such as Des O'Connor took up > valuable space. That was very true throughout the 60s and much of the 70s. Biggest UK hit of '66 was "Strangers in the Night" wasn't it? Or maybe it was "Tears" by Ken Dodd! Biggest UK hit of '67 was "Release Me"! Makes me wonder if all the crooners died, or if it was their audience which all died, because I can't remember the same phenomenon in the 80s or 90s. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:12:17 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Liz Damon and the Orient Express > Hello, Mary! Glad to hear of other fans of Liz Damon's > Orient Express, I too have the group's two albums on > White Whale, as well as their first album on the Anthem > label. I don't know if they did any other LP's. By the > way, you can get "1900 Yesterday" on a White Whale > compilation CD-I highly recommend this CD since it has a > great many excellent tracks from the label, which has > always been one of my favorites. Hopefully another White > Whale comp. will be issued - I would LOVE to get "Superman" > by the Clique on a CD. > I heard that Liz Damon has been living in Las Vegas for the > last few years. I don't know if she still records or performs. Art, that is cool to hear that you like the Varese "Happy Together: The Very Best of White Whale" Cd! I've never heard much talk about it, but I did more work for that booklet than any I've ever worked on. Besides Alan Gordon's title contribution, there's the other WW hits (Liz Damon, Nino & April, Rene & Rene, both Clique hits), the nearly hits (Prof Morrison, Feather, Lyme & Cyball), the pricey/rare 45s (Matthew Moore, John's Children) and some fairly unknown gems like the Comittee's "California My Way" and the early Paul Davis goodie, the Reivers' "Constantly"! Great Cd indeed! What you must not know is that Varese did release a best of Clique Cd also featuring all their Lp plus all the mono 45 versions as well. Thus, 02 "Superman" versions with sound by Bill Inglot!! The CD came out in 1998, so don't know if in print, but likely can be found on ebay or the normal CD internet sites. Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 16:33:53 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Glen Campbell mugshot/Being There Phil Milstein wrote: > Glen Campbell fans will not appreciate the excruciating > mugshot taken during his recent arrest in Phoenix, but, > in the name of the truth, should probably take a look at > it anyway. I'm sure there are many versions of it already > on the Internet, but the one link I have (from a newspaper in New Zealand) is at: > http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2739470a1860,00.html > I saw Glen perform this past August. Apart from opening his > (polyester) shirt and twirling his (right) nipple in time to > his (quite excellent) impression of Elvis doing Don't Be Cruel > -- which left co-star Andy Williams, with whom he'd been > bantering, utterly speechless -- he seemed in fine form, and > in fact I loved the show. Were it not for the caption underneath, > I would not have recognized him from the aforementioned mugshot. Phil, I saw it on TV last week. Another reason why "Being There" in the 60's is so important to me. I will remember Glen for the great songs he sang and the high pitched "Hi, I'm Glen Campbell.." that he started his TV shows with. THAT is the Glen Campbell that I remember and love. Everyone has their problems in life and I like to separate that from the music I loved. I still like some of Michael Jackson's stuff even if he has turned out to be a freak. It's what the music does for you that you have to separate from all these musicians hard times. You can feel for them, but don't let it take their music away from you. Sorry, I get a little carried away, I guess....:) Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 18:05:00 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs Clark Besch: > Hi Orion, Those bubblegum CDs that are selling constatntly > on Ebay are indeed bootlegs....... > there is a Robbs boot on Ebay going for high prices even tho off > vinyl too! I'd like to have the 2 WRIT tracks on them, but I got > everything else, so why spend all that money? Mark: > What are these 2 WRIT tracks you speak of? I compiled my > own Robbs CDR with all of the singles plus the album. Is > WRIT a label they recorded a single on? Or a radio station? Orion, The WRIT songs are from a 4 song Ep that radio station WRIT in Milwaukee released in 1966 prior to the Robbs' Mercury contract began. One of the tracks, "You've Got Your Troubles", was lip synched on "Where the Action Is". I compiled my own Robbs CD too, if you'd like a copy. As for bootlegs, I am sitting with a "Lost Jukeboxes, Vol. 73", four aircheck CDRs at my feet. I love getting ANYTHING I'm interested in from the 60s whether from CDRs, cassettes or reel-to -reels. Thus bootlegs. I'm not too happy about them being sold for $20 on ebay, especially if they don't tell you they are vinyl transfers. Anyone on this site would likely know a bootleg anyway, tho. As for Lyang's son, if you were the artist and not getting any legit writers royalties or performer royalties, you might feel differently about bootlegs. It is certainly a possiblity that those Date sides could show up on a legit comp someday, thus garnering a small royalty, so it is likely a little bit of money and more likely, the point that someone else is making money and the actual artist isn't. Same old story, I'm afraid. Anyway, it is often a touchy subject, and I can see your side, my side, Lyang's son's side. Who is right, I dunno...... Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 20:55:58 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: "Girls' Song" Clark Besch wrote: > Richard and Bob, the reason for "The Girl's Song" 1970 release > as a 45 by the 5D is somewhat two-fold. The 5D had just left > their old label, Johnny Rivers' Soul City, and "Girl's Song" > was used by Soul City as an after-the-fact "cash in" as > often happened in those days(and still does). Released > simultaneously with Bell Records'(their new label) "Puppet Man", > both great songs failed to reach the positions they likely > could have achieved if not battling each other. But, to show > how hot that group was at that time, "Girls" still got to #43 > and "Puppet Man" #24! Personally, I think "Girl's Song" is > one of their best! > The second reason for the "Girl's Song" 45 release was its then > current use as advertising for Bell telephone (again with Bell?). > It was used in commercials at the time and appears on a special > Bell advertising LP as the main track. Thanks Clark, I often wondered why the lag! I agree that it's one of the 5th D's best efforts (amongst many fine Webb and other writers songs). Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:56:09 EST From: John Fox Subject: Re: Rusty York > When I last spoke with him (at least 6 years ago) he was > still running his studio, but I assume that by now he may > be retired (?) Rusty is still around. He lives in my suburb (Wyoming, Ohio) and his studio can be found at http://www.JewelRecords.com My son's band (18 year-old funk-rockers) just recorded a CD there. Rusty can also be found playing blues harp on one cut of that great Cincinnati blues band's album, "The Sacred Mushroom" which was recorded at Jewel in the late 60s, (http://www.artistdirect.com/store/artist/album/0,,157993,00.html#review), as was Lonnie Mack's late 60s work that included a song, "Mt. Healthy Blues", named after the Cincinnati suburb where Jewel Studios resides. John Fox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 20:59:30 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year Bit off topic really, but this mornings re-run of "Bewitched" (I can't do anything in the morning before three cups of coffee and half an hour with Samantha Stevens) was a Christmas edition. The Stevens and the Kravitzes each take home an orphan for the Christmas holidays and give them the full tree/present/ Santa schtick - despite the seemingly obvious fact that Gladys and Abner Kravitz's are... Jewish. It's a particularly bad episode. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 21:03:05 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Dreck in the charts Paul Bryant wrote: > Makes me wonder if all the crooners died, or if it > was their audience which all died, because I can't > remember the same phenomenon in the 80s or 90s. The crooners metamorphosed into Robson and Jerome! 'Unchained Melody' and 'I Believe' spent a total of eleven weeks at No.1 in 1995. Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2003 01:54:18 -0000 From: Shawn Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Good point about the chart differences, but it also amazes me that many well known US artists never made a dent in the British charts. Example: BJ Thomas is a one-hit wonder over there! Re: Shivaree Theme - The tune is "Diamond Head" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 15:58:25 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Hannukah is My Time of Year Larry Lapka wrote: > ...with all the major talents in the recording industry who are > Jewish, why do Jews release Christmas albums? Why do Jewish > performers not acknowledge that their holiday is as special as > Christmas. They record Christmas albums because many Christmas classics have been written by Jewish songsmiths, Mel Torme and Irving Berlin for starters. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.