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Spectropop - Digest Number 1143



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: The Wild Ones / Chip Taylor
           From: Phil Milstein 
      2. Re: Teddy Randazzo R.I.P. / Derek Martin
           From: David A. Young 
      3. Re: Teddy Randazzo R.I.P. / Derek Martin
           From: James Botticelli 
      4. Re: Gay Davies
           From: Orion 
      5. The Ronettes on Shindig!
           From: Sean 
      6. Carthage
           From: Scott 
      7. Glen Campbell mugshot
           From: Phil Milstein 
      8. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Tony Leong 
      9. Re: White Soul
           From: Bill George 
     10. Please Help! Xmas Songs needed!
           From: Michael 
     11. Re: Shortest Track of all time/Short elpees
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs
           From: Clark Besch 
     13. Gazette Records
           From: Frank 
     14. Re: Saturday's Father
           From: Stewart Mason 
     15. The Onyx
           From: Richard Prest 
     16. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     17. Bah humbug!
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     18. Hannukah is My Time of Year
           From: Lapka Larry 
     19. Re: Liz Damon and the  Orient Express
           From: Art Longmire 
     20. Chip Taylor in UK Esquire
           From: Michael Fishberg 
     21. Re: House Of The Rising Sun
           From: Clark Besch 
     22. Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs
           From: Mark 
     23. My Girl The Month Of May
           From: Dave Heasman 
     24. Re: born too early
           From: Clark Besch 
     25. Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures
           From: Mike Edwards 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 20:27:44 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: The Wild Ones / Chip Taylor Guy Lawrence wrote: > Hi Phil, aren't you thinking of the later 60s group called Wild > Thing, a bar band whose album was a rare lapse of taste for the > Elektra label? Um, probably. And here I was afraid I was mixing them up with Wild Cherry! Chastened, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 01:13:52 -0000 From: David A. Young Subject: Re: Teddy Randazzo R.I.P. / Derek Martin Mick Patrick: > Agreed, "You Better Go" is a magnificent record, readily available > on CD, for those who might be interested. It was not only co-written > by Randazzo, but arranged and produced by him as well. In a quest to > make musica a Randazzo-only zone, I've posted Martin's "Your Daddy > Wants His Baby Back (Roulette 4647, 1965), another Randazzo song/ > arrangement/production: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Thanks for playing "Your Daddy Wants His Baby Back" to musica, Mick. Since The Top Notes were recently under discussion here (in connection with their Spector-produced original version of "Twist and Shout"), I thought I'd mention, for the benefit of those who don't know, that Derek's the lead singer of that group (as Derek Ray). A complete Derekography can be found here: http://members.tripod.com/SoulfulKindaMusic/topnotes.htm David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 16:55:18 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Teddy Randazzo R.I.P. / Derek Martin Mick Patrick wrote: > (Derek Martin's) "You Better Go" is a magnificent record, readily > available on CD, for those who might be interested. It was not only > co-written by (Teddy) Randazzo, but arranged and produced by him as > well. I DJ'd a Class Reunion in Lexington, MA last night and unbeknownst to anyone I ended the evening with that very song. Having started it with Dee Dee Warwick's "You're No Good". A great night of floorpackin' fun. JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 10:33:16 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: Gay Davies Steve Harvey: > Bisexuality has been part of the Brother Davies' history. David > Watts was a promoter who wanted Dave Davies and was immortalized > by Brother Ray. Maybe that is why they came up with the name the "Kinks"? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:51:53 -0000 From: Sean Subject: The Ronettes on Shindig! I was watching a tape from the show "Shindig!" and it was an episode that had the Ronettes on it. And I loved it! In the beginning they sang a little bit of "All Shook Up" and I was surprised to hear Estelle and Nedra sing their own line. Estelle sounds a lot like Ronnie and Nedra is great! Then they lip-synched to "Born to be Together" on the spiral stair case(the camera guy must've liked Estelle on this song!) Then came "Be My Baby" and I was wondering is Estelle and Nedra singing on the pre-recorded track on this song? It sounds like them but as if their voices are overdubbed. Mary and Flo overdubbed their voices when they sang "Come see about me" on the show so I figured Estelle and Nedra did too. Anyone have answers? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 20:57:33 EST From: Scott Subject: Carthage Steve Harvey: > Folk-rock of a different sort, Brit folkies like Sandy Denny, Richard > Thompson, the future Mrs. Thompson - Linda Peters, etc. Some great > covers of early 60s and 50s tunes. I bought a copy of the Carthage reissue a couple of years ago. Given the lineup I guess I was expecting something in the Fairport Convention realm. It was different, but in a nice way. I was impressed by the energy and affection they showed in the covers. Wish I had the extended CD lineup ... Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 20:41:19 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Glen Campbell mugshot Glen Campbell fans will not appreciate the excruciating mugshot taken during his recent arrest in Phoenix, but, in the name of the truth, should probably take a look at it anyway. I'm sure there are many versions of it already on the Internet, but the one link I have (from a newspaper in New Zealand) is at: http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2739470a1860,00.html I saw Glen perform this past August. Apart from opening his (polyester) shirt and twirling his (right) nipple in time to his (quite excellent) impression of Elvis doing Don't Be Cruel -- which left co-star Andy Williams, with whom he'd been bantering, utterly speechless -- he seemed in fine form, and in fact I loved the show. Were it not for the caption underneath, I would not have recognized him from the aforementioned mugshot. See it and weep. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 09:13:36 -0000 From: Tony Leong Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Paul Bryant wrote: > Dear all, I have a list of these is anyone's interested - they all > made No 1 in the US but didn't chart at all in the UK. It's a > weird list as you may imagine, & contains such surprising songs as: > Please Mr Postman - Marvelettes > This Diamond Ring - Gary Lewis & the Playboys > The Sound of Silence - Simon & Grafunkel > Cherish - The Association > Kind of a Drag - The Buckinghams > Windy - The Association > Crimson and Clover - Tommy James The biggest US #1 that was a UK flop that I know of was Lulu's "To Sir With Love"!! Even the movie was a flop in the UK!!!!!! Tony -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 30 Nov 2003 23:25:46 EST From: Bill George Subject: Re: White Soul "Put A Little Love In Your Heart" is most often heard in black gospel arrangments. Take the latest Gap ad for evidence. Practically all of the cover versions of this song recorded in the last ten years have been by R&B or gospel artists. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 14:37:05 -0000 From: Michael Subject: Please Help! Xmas Songs needed! Does anyone have any of these songs that they could please let me hear? I need these tracks ASAP. * "I Want A Beatle For Christmas" by Patty Surby and the Canadian V.I.P.'s (and/or the versions by Jackie & Jill or Becky Lee Beck versions) * "Bring Me A Beatle For Christmas" by Cindy Rella * "Christmas With The Beatles" by Judy & The Duets * "Santa Bring Me Ringo" by Christine Hunter * "Ringo Bells" by Three Blonde Mice Any help would be GREATLY appreciated, and I'd be happy to recipricate through trade. THANKS VERY MUCH!!!! -Michael -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 17:38:43 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Shortest Track of all time/Short elpees Steven Prazak wrote: > I seem to recall a "tune" by '70s band Mason Prophet called, if > memory serves, Apple Tart that lasted for one mighty solitary > second. Another short album was Capitol's Beatles Story, > inexplicably a double album set, with side 4 clocking in at an > anemic 9 minutes. Amusingly enough, the Japanese CD re-ish from > the '80s is also a 2-CD set. Altho not by any means in comparison with all the tracks mentioned, I'll list 3 shorties. First, the great "Sarah Silvia Stout Would No take the Garbage Out" by Shel Silversteen on Columbia. I think it's about :26 and a great song to sing when just goofing around with a friend! Then the terrific Mamas & Papas B-side "Once Was A Time I Thought". At around :32, it was the first REALLY short song I heard on the radio. I have WLS' Ron Riley playing the B side of "Look Thru My Window" taped from when it was released. Lastly, Sundazed reissued on Cd an Lp by JK and Company a couple of years ago. Altho I helped with the booklet, I've never heard that one. It had a :32 song called "Break of Dawn" which describes a man's life from birth to death! Hmm, how long did he live?? I believe the great Duane Eddy tune "Some Kind-a Earthquake" running at 1:17 is the shortest song to ever hit the Billboard Top 40. I would guess that feat will never be broken!! Hey, those DC5 Lps mighta been short, but there was so much better music in those Lps than many of their counterparts at the time that I'm sure not complainin'! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 17:24:40 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs Orion wrote: > One thing for sure, these CDs are harder than ever to get ahold of. > There is someone on ebay selling them again. Oddly, enough this > person and supposedly this person's friend are the only people I > have ever seen sell them. If anyone has any place to get them other > than from Hairlessspider on ebay please let me know. Indeed there > are some great songs on these CDs. Because of them I have purchased > several LPs "Main Attraction", "Silver", "Good N Plenty" and many > others because of one song. I have not been disappointed by the LPs. Hi Orion, Those bubblegum Cds that are selling constatntly on Ebay are indeed bootlegs. Awhile back, I was in contact with Lyang Martine, Jr's son (Lyang Jr. Jr.??) talking about his dad's writings (best known for "Rub It in" and "Greatest Man I Never Knew"), mainly a personal fave, "Love Comes & Goes" from 1960's Date Records. Anyway, when I told him of these Cds of which both Date sides were on, he immediately got them to remove those songs or be sued, which they apparently did remove. So, they are boots, albeit good songs! FYI, there is a Robbs boot on Ebay going for high prices even tho off vinyl too! I'd like to have the 2 WRIT tracks on them, but I got everything else, so why spend all that money? Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 13:50:26 -0000 From: Frank Subject: Gazette Records Stuart; > I had no idea there had been a Gazette label. Can you tell me > when it was set up and who distributed it? Also, any ideas > about how many records it issued? Stuart, I have no answers to your questions about when "Gazette Records" was set up and who distributed it. There is nothing on the Internet that I could locate. Perhaps some information could be found in a truly comprehensive discography book. Maybe you could take that up as a task and report back. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 08:23:00 -0800 (PST) From: Stewart Mason Subject: Re: Saturday's Father Steve Harvey writes: > "Saturday's Father" was the first example of Men's Lib that I know > of in rock and roll. The first (and maybe only until Sting's "I'm > So Happy I'm Crying") tune to deal with fathers' rights. Although one could make an argument for Chuck Berry's "Memphis"... It's an underexplored topic, it's true, but Clive Gregson (former leader of the UK pub-rockers Any Trouble) wrote a terrific song called "Summer Rain" about mens' rights in child custody cases, on his album STRANGE PERSUASIONS (Demon 1985), and more recently, the hip-hop duo Outkast had a hit with "Ms. Jackson" (on STANKONIA, Arista 2000), a song directed to the mother of R&B singer Erykah Badu, with whom Outkast's Andre Benjamin had split up, asserting Andre's right to remain a part of their son's life against his grandmother's wishes. I'm sure at least one member of the sensitive-young-man-with-a-guitar '70s singer-songwriter brigade wrote a song or two on the topic as well. S -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 17:41:10 -0000 From: Richard Prest Subject: The Onyx I'm trying to complete my collection of all the singles by The Onyx. Having had no success in tracking down the original vinyl I'm wondering if anyone can help with any of these tracks; 1] The Onyx - The Next Stop Is Mine (1971) 2] The Onyx - What's That You Say (1971) 3] Salamander - Crystal Ball (1970) 4] Salamander - Billy (1970) Can anyone help??? Happy to reciprocate! Rich -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 12:49:01 EST From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures That "Sound of Silence" didn't chart at all in the UK DOES surprise me! How did Simon and Garfunkel do overall in the Kingdom? Were any of their recordings widely popular? Much of the American folk- rock such as the Byrds and the Mamas & Papas was successful in Britain at least to a certain extent, wasn't it? Records such as "Windy" and "Crimson and Clover" probably bored the English DJs out of their gourds with their Oh-So-American-Teeny-Bopper sounds and lyrics. At the same time, Gary Lewis had some Brit Invasion influence, methinks--those wonderful minor chords on "This Diamond Ring", for example, call to mind music by The Searchers, The Zombies, The Animals..... Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 13:21:01 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Bah humbug! About this time of year everyone dusts off their copy of "Phil Spector's Christmas Album", be it on CD, re-issue or original LP. I seem to remember queries about a tape named "Christmas Wall Of Sound - A Tribute To Phil Spector" last year. Anyway, I have found mine buried in a pile of cassettes no one listens to anymore, so if you want a listen contact me off group. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:32:56 -0800 (PST) From: Lapka Larry Subject: Hannukah is My Time of Year Dear All: I run a couple of Yahoo Groups myself, but I figured I would get a better response if I posted this question here: Why is there a dearth of Hannukah songs in popular music--whether it be rock and roll, pop, or any other manifestation of the two? I have been contemplating this question for years, and never really received a good answer from anyone. I posed this to a program director, who was not playing any Hannukah themed records around holiday time (yes, obviously, there are Hannukah songs out there), and he basically said that Jews do not look a their holiday as non-Jews look at Christmas; it wasn' thought to be a major holiday on the Jewish calendar, thus, there are few songs of this genre to play. Now, of course, in the United States, that's really a bunch of nonsense. It is the major holiday of the year, especially for kids, and if it has become something of a "jewish" (yes, I did lowercase that j) Christmas, that's the way it is. And by the way, when the station did play a "Hannukah" song, it was Adam Sandler's song, but it was announced by the DJ as "another Christmas song." I kid you not. More to my point: with all the major talents in the recording industry who are Jewish, why do Jews release Christmas albums? Why do Jewish performers not acknowledge that their holiday is as special as Christmas. Jews have written some of the most wonderful Christmas songs of all that we hear every year (Mel Torme, Irving Berling among those writers). However, as a Jew with children, it is getting harder and harder every year to be virtually the outsider looking in, so to speak. What gives? I ask this not to knock Christmas music, which I happen to love too, but where is my holiday when it comes to popular music? Sorry to be long winded. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 20:07:44 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Liz Damon and the Orient Express Mary S. in Ohio: > Hi, Art! Oh, I just love Liz Damon's Orient Express and have two > of their albums. Both are on the White Whale label, which also put > out great records by Nino Tempo and April Stevens and the Turtles, > among others. It's wonderful to know that others have enjoyed the > easy listening and gentle music by Liz Damon and her group. Hawaii > can be proud of that group. Of course, I also like Don Ho, who is > practically a symbol of Hawaiian popular/native music. He has a > very soft voice, but it has a lovely quality. Unfortunately, on some > of his albums, he mixed in a lot of patter with the audience, which I > thought distracted from his music. Hello, Mary! Glad to hear of other fans of Liz Damon's Orient Express, I too have the group's two albums on White Whale, as well as their first album on the Anthem label. I don't know if they did any other LP's. By the way, you can get "1900 Yesterday" on a White Whale compilation CD-I highly recommend this CD since it has a great many excellent tracks from the label, which has always been one of my favorites. Hopefully another White Whale comp. will be issued-I would LOVE to get "Superman" by the Clique on a CD. I heard that Liz Damon has been living in Las Vegas for the last few years. I don't know if she still records or performs. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 12:24:01 -0800 (PST) From: Michael Fishberg Subject: Chip Taylor in UK Esquire Chip Taylor has feature in UK December Esquire magazine and talks about Wild Thing... Michael Fishberg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 18:29:43 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: House Of The Rising Sun Previously: > "House Of The Rising Sun" - I always liked the Jody Miller version. > The Supremes version of "House Of The Rising Sun" from the 1964 > Motown LP "A Bit Of Liverpool" is my nomination for the most > unnecessary version to be sung to date. One of my fave versions is Oscar & the Majestics' "House of the Rising Sun '69". Very bizarre! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 21:05:49 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Japanese Bubblegum CDs Clark Besch: > Hi Orion, Those bubblegum Cds that are selling constatntly on Ebay are > indeed bootlegs. Awhile back, I was in contact with Lyang Martine, > Jr's son (Lyang Jr. Jr.??) talking about his dad's writings (best > known for "Rub It in" and "Greatest Man I Never Knew"), mainly a > personal fave, "Love Comes & Goes" from 1960's Date Records. Anyway, > when I told him of these Cds of which both Date sides were on, he > immediately got them to remove those songs or be sued, which they > apparently did remove. So, they are boots, albeit good songs! FYI, > there is a Robbs boot on Ebay going for high prices even tho off > vinyl too! I'd like to have the 2 WRIT tracks on them, but I got > everything else, so why spend all that money? What are these 2 WRIT tracks you speak of? I compiled my own Robbs CDR with all of the singles plus the album. Is WRIT a label they recorded a single on? Or a radio station? Regarding something like the above with Layng Martine's son threatening to sue, I really don't get the mentality. Does he think that by selling the bootleg it is taking money out of his dad's or his pocket? These are recordings that are over 30 years old. They have zero commercial value. They will never be repressed on vinyl nor will they ever see the light of day on a legitimate CD. Same goes for a million other non-hit recordings. The only people who stand to lose any income are the old record dealers who might have copies to sell at a convention, a store or in discoveries. I thought the whole idea of music was to try to be heard by as many people as possible. Those fans buying the bootleg might never have heard of Martine or some of the other artists and they might like the stuff enough to pursue further work by them. That's exactly how I collect - I hear something I like and then I track down what else they may have recorded. So if you speak to your friend again, just ask him exactly what he thinks he accomplished. I'd love to know how he thinks its beneficial to have even fewer people hear his dad. I happen to think that bootlegs serve a legitimate purpose. How many recordings are there that are being held hostage in major labels vaults? So many things are just not commercially viable for them to reissue. That leaves scouring the world for the vinyl or if you're lucky enough, picking up a bootleg. That guy from Marginal did a great job of issuing stuff. I don't care if they were legit or not. If the record companies don't like it, let them put these things out. Now that we have "legitimate, pay downloading" services, will the record companies put all of their one-off, non-hit product on there for us to pay for? Or will it be the same junk you can buy in a store? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 19:12:03 -0000 From: Dave Heasman Subject: My Girl The Month Of May Steve Harvey: > The standouts are "My Girl The Merry Month Of May" by the Belmonts > (sans Dion, I think) "My Girl The Month Of May" was the b-side of "Berimbau" and also on "Dion & The Belmonts Together Again" from 1967. It's a brilliant and very clever song, just made for Dion, his cracked agonised voice.. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 18:26:22 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: born too early Alan Zweig wrote: > ...I tried to tell him that if he'd been born in the forties, > there's no guarantee he would have gotten into doowop. Especially > given the fact that in the late sixties, he got into doowop and > ignored all the "psychedelic" stuff of the day. He didn't seem to > understand what I was saying. But then he made my point for me by > informing me that he'd gone to Woodstock but ONLY to see Sha-na-na. Alan, Your point is well taken, however, I have to say that it was fantastic to be there if you had a story similar to mine. As a kid, I got exposed to top 40 radio thru my brothers at an early age and with my dad having a great receiver and us living in Dodge City, Kansas, it was perfect for hearing ALL the big city (as well as small market) stations from east coast to west! I got a taste of all the great Djs and varieties of local hits of the time. I certainly have heard more 60's non-hits since the 60's than I heard IN the 60's, but I sure heard a lot of them back then! Add to it that I got Dj 45s starting in 67, and thus was singing "This Will be Our Year" by the Zombies as well as many more that never got airplay then, that added to the "being there" appeal. Sure, many didn't get these experiences, but many did, and those wouldn't trade the memories for the world. Also, in the case of those who didn't live the radio or obscurities life at the time, would you wanna be the one who heard "Let It Be" before hearing "I Want to Hold Your Hand"?? One thing I didn't get that much into back then, was what the artist was all about. I got into that after my friend, Doug Richard, asked me one day "Don't you want to know these guy's story?" At the time, I said "Naw." As he enlightened me on our radio show and I began delving myself into all these songs I loved as a kid, it was quite interesting. Yet, "being there" was great also, because I didn't know the Beatles were into drugs so early. I didn't know Brian Wilson had problems or that Mike Love was a total jerk. Now, I still love the Beach Boys' music, but I often think these things when I hear a song I know the story on. I'd just have soon stayed in the "being there" period in these cases. Anyway, nothing compared to that first hearing of a new Beatles track on the radio for me! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 19:43:10 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: USA No 1s which were UK chart failures Paul Bryant writes: > I have a list of these is anyone's interested - they all made No > 1 in the US but didn't chart at all in the UK. It's a weird list > as you may imagine, & contains such surprising songs as: > Please Mr Postman - Marvelettes > This Diamond Ring - Gary Lewis & the Playboys > The Sound of Silence - Simon & Grafunkel > Cherish - The Association > Kind of a Drag - The Buckinghams > Windy - The Association > Crimson and Clover - Tommy James Yes, bring it on; I'd love to see the list. When I saw the above list I reached for my "Guinness Book of British Hit Singles" and you're right, "Sounds Of Silence" wasn't there! But then you can extend your argument and wonder why the above consistent US hit makers made so little impact on the UK charts. Their total haul of UK hits were: Marvelettes (1), Gary Lewis & The Playboys (1 in 1975), Association (1), Buckinghams (0), Tommy James & The Shondells (2). Add to that: Paul Revere & The Raiders (0), Jay & The Americans (0), Tokens (1), American Breed (1) and the Young Rascals (2). Then what about US balladeers/soul men who had loads of hits in the US but not the UK: Bobby Vinton (3, 01 of which was in 1990), Ronnie Dove (0), Joe Tex (1), Lou Rawls (1). I mean, how long do I spend on this. I would offer three arguments: 1) A limited number of chart positions to compete for; the US has always had 100, the UK had, at most, 50. 2) Competition from home grown product with TV and radio exposure. Jay Black told me that he came over, but I don't remember it and I know the American Breed didn't. 3) Very little radio time available for "pop" music. It got better toward the end of the 60s but prior to this you had to hunt your stations down to find the music. 4) A general Moms and Dads feel to the UK charts, so guys such as Des O'Connor took up valuable space. Having said that, someone will probably advise me that Des has a northern soul single and that he really was hot. (Des vs Ronnie Dove? Go back to the homegrown point.) So there you have it, PB, it's not that we were musically illiterate or anything. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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