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Spectropop - Digest Number 1128



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Nitzsche at Spectropop Update
           From: Martin Roberts 
      2. Re: New @ musica: Kim Carnes / The Guilloteens
           From: Ken Mortimer 
      3. Re: L.A. Smoke
           From: Patrick Rands 
      4. Disco
           From: Steve Harvey 
      5. Teenagers' cultural experience
           From: Mike Edwards 
      6. The Fixodent song
           From: Andrew Jones 
      7. ISB; Doo-wop; Kit Kats; Nino & April; perfect pitch; short Lp's
           From: Country Paul 
      8. The First Disco Rekkid
           From: Simon White 
      9. Re: Modern Doo Wop
           From: Paul Bryant 
     10. Bo Diddley's 75th birthday party
           From: David Blakey 
     11. Re: ISB pop / Doo wop
           From: Paul Bryant 
     12. Re: Wild Thing
           From: Fred 
     13. Sinatra concept album
           From: Stuart Miller 
     14. Sugaree - which version came first?
           From: Rob 
     15. Re: Bob Seger
           From: Tom Taber 
     16. Disco Rocks (on Ace Records)
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     17. Re: The First Disco Rekkid
           From: Fred 
     18. Beatles
           From: Clark Besch 
     19. Re: Sugaree - which version came first?
           From: Fred 
     20. Hollies
           From: Clark Besch 
     21. Beverley Sisters - there were never such devoted....
           From: Dave Heasman 
     22. Re: Gary Usher and Dick Campbell
           From: Clark Besch 
     23. Re: Sugaree - which version came first?
           From: Paul Balser 
     24. Re: Bob Seger
           From: Joe Nelson 
     25. Seasons' psychedelia
           From: Paul Bryant 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2003 23:05:25 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Nitzsche at Spectropop Update With That Alan receiving the wonderful news of becoming a granddad, I doubt that losing out in the 'Battle of the Nitzsche's' will cause much distress :-) But I was surprised by the result. The record playing this week is "Run Cindy Run" by Sumner. Hear it on Jack Nitzsche's home page: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm Next week's choice is between two instrumentals: Don Randi with "Spanish Harlem" or Chet Baker's Mariachi Brass with "La Bamba". On the Radio is playing jingle #5 (Nitzsche's Monkey): http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/radio.htm Al Hazan features another track by the Starr Sisters, "Ready For A Change", along with a super picture of the girls: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/ahjnrotw.htm Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 00:30:59 -0000 From: Ken Mortimer Subject: Re: New @ musica: Kim Carnes / The Guilloteens S'pop Team announced: > New @ musica: > > Kim Carnes "From The Inside" (original demo) > Inspirational Artie Wayne song. > (See Message #15018 from Artie Wayne) > > The Guilloteens "I Don't Believe" (HBR 446, 1965) > The Righteous Brothers meet the MFQ. One listen and it becomes > easier to envisage the unissued Phil Spector-produced version. > (See Message #14974 from Amber) > > Click here to listen to both tracks: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Thanks for posting this. It's really nice (although I must confess to having a real soft spot for the 1977 version by the late Vicki Brown). Ken -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 01:46:52 -0000 From: Patrick Rands Subject: Re: L.A. Smoke Phil Milstein wrote: > A friend of mine asked me: "Know anything about an L.A. pop- > psych band (1968 or s) called Smoke? Hi Phil, There's also this website with more information on The LA Smoke: http://members.rott.chello.nl/cvanderlely/wcpaeb/articles/thesmoke.ht ml It's a great LP, very Beatlesque and worthy of being reissued, been talked about for years but nothing yet. The October Country album is similar and has been reissued by Rev-Ola and it sounds great. Here's hoping Rev-Ola have some Smoke up their sleeves. :Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 17:57:28 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Disco Sorry Stuffed Animal, but I have to agree with Bob Seger and his sentiment, "Give Me That Old Time Rock and Roll". I have nothing against dance music, but the majority of disco did sux. Low grade lyrics plopped over a dance tempo. Melodies didn't seem to essential to most disco music. I think part of the popularity of disco came from the push the industry gave it. The disposable artist really reached its heyday during disco. It's hard to find any disco acts that had more than one or two hits (the exceptions seem to be KC, Donna Summers and the Village People). The majority seemed to fit the "use and lose 'em". Forget acts like the Beatles that musically evolved before your eyes (and ears). Get an act have a hit, rip them off and then find some new fools. The rot really set into the music scene in the 70s. Compared to rap disco might sound great, but following the 50s and, even more so, the 60s, it was a letdown. I started swing dancing in 1988 and have gone through my collection looking for tunes that have that "swing" factor ever since. There is not reason dance music has to be so mundane. I'll give it a 9 cause you can dance to it and, even better, I can think to it as well. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 02:24:41 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Teenagers' cultural experience Jerophonic writes: > I always think of "Sunny" together with "Goin' Out of My Head" and, > later, "(You Are the) Sunshine of My Life": great soulful pop > performances that were immediately emasculated by Vegas > schlockmeisters like the Lettermen and Buddy Greco. I used to sit > home and cringe while these songs got butchered on shows like Merv > Griffin's and Mike Douglas's. Is there an equivalent cultural > experience for teenagers today? Yes there is and I would nominate "American Idol" (the Playstaion 2 version) for that honor. It's available on amazon.com for $39.88, a saving of $0.11 off the list price. Amazon.com also offers the "American Idol Karaoke with Video Camera" (from Craig Electronics) at $79.99, which is a $20.00 saving off list. This is probably a close second. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 23:22:33 -0500 (EST) From: Andrew Jones Subject: The Fixodent song Okay, I've avoided burdening S'pop with this question, but I'm not getting any answers anywhere else, so here goes. Here in the US, there's a TV commercial currently running for Fixodent denture adhesive. It shows two attractive middle-aged people on a picnic basket, nibbling on strawberries and having a fine time. (One of them is wearing dentures ... but which one?) Anyway, the song on the soundtrack sounds like vintage mid- to late- period Spectropop. It goes in part, "Whatever you may do, I just wanna be there with you." Does anyone know what this song is called, and who does it? Is it an oldie, or a well-disguised "newie"? Thanks. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 01:44:41 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: ISB; Doo-wop; Kit Kats; Nino & April; perfect pitch; short Lp's Paul Bryant: > Speaking as the moderator of the Incredible String Band Yahoogroup, > I'd say you your next purchase should be Wee Tam and the Big Huge. ISB's "Air" is one of the most beautiful - and strangely mixed - songs I know. It segues oddly well into "Ripple" by the Grateful Dead, too. I'm going a bit far afield from our topic here, but to my ears those were also among the most "pop" songs each band did. Paul Bryant again: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting > myself? JB: > Short answer? You can't... True, JB. But here's a suggestion, Paul: reverse import. The dollar is still a good value compared to European currencies, and with websites like Collectibles offering some serious sale items and closeouts, even with overseas shipping the prices might be better than locally in the UK. Of course, in Britain you've got those great Ace and Rev-ola comps with cool liner notes by Mick Patrick and others - and those cost a fortune over here. (Collectibles is not known for its liner notes.) Steve Harvey, Re: Kit Kats > Country Paul,...[m]aybe you could put on the Tik Taks doing the > instrumental version of "Let's Get Lost" on Guyden...and the tune > "That You Love" on Paramount since neither are on the double CD on > Jamie. I just got this message from November 15th, and with Thanksgiving coming don't know when I'll have time to attempt this heretofore unknown-to-me technology. Nick Archer: > ["Let's Get Lost On A Country Road"] is one of my favorite songs of > all time, and really brings back the feeling of Philadelphia radio > in the 60's. If the stations there are ignoring their heritage, and > not playing all the great music made right there, it's a shame. Seconding JB, it IS a shame. Welcome to 21st century corporate radio. Yecch! Incidentally, the Philly-hit "Let's Get Lost On A Country Road" is in print on a Jamie CD: http://www.jamguy.com Dave Heasman, thanks for the note on the Beverly Sisters. With their resurgence, do you know if "For You" or anything else in that style is available on CD? Steve Stanley: > "Wings of Love" b/w "My Old Flame" (WHITE WHALE 246) was released > by White Whale in 1968. The year you cite is obviously correct; they were still on Atco back in '62. I mis-read the date I noted on the jacket when I commented here (had I been more awake, I would have caught it). Perhaps your remastering is the reason the on-air version sounded so good. By the way, which side was the "A" side? (I would have thought "Flame" would have been pushed, in keeping with their hit remakes of oldies.) And are any other Rev-ola tracks besides this and "Boys Town" not duplicated from the Varese CD (which I enjoy tremendously, including their previously-unreleased later tracks)? Steve Harvey: > I remember my music teacher saying that perfect pitch was a kind > of curse. A car would make a corner too fast and the tires would > squeal. Because it was slightly offkey it would drive anybody > with perfect pitch up the wall. Kind of like chalk squeaking on > the blackboard. I have perfect pitch. Car tires and chalk don't "get" me, but it's hard for me to read music in one key and hear the notes transposed to another. Overall, though, I think it's been more a blessing than a curse. Paul Bryant: > Why were some albums so remarkably short? By 1963 Bob Dylan's > albums were up to 45, even 50 minutes whilst at the same time the > Beach Boys and Simon & Garfunkel would put out Wild Honey & > Parsley Sage which were less than half that length - 22 minutes > in the case of one Beach Boys album. That's hardly long enough > to make a decent cup of tea! Were American albums in the mid-60s > all short? The Beatles' were around 35 minutes and I thought > that was the average. Billy G. Spradlin: > I have never understood why USA record companies had to chop up > British Invasion albums, besides not having hit singles on UK > albums and songwriting royalties. There was a trend, with Capitol leading it, to cut back from 12-cut albums to 11- and even 10-cut affairs. That was it, Billy: less to pay in royalties. The rationale I heard from Capitol promo people was "it's this, or raise the price in the stores." In the case of pop acts with shorter songs, like the Beach Boys, it resulted in some really short albums (and increased space between the grooves to make the album look longer). Note that the number of tracks remained the same despite the length of the song (except for legitimately long songs of several minutes, which ate up a lot of "real estate" on the record). More soon, Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 09:45:28 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: The First Disco Rekkid Before you can talk about the first disco record you have to define the word "disco". To most people, mention the word and they'll think Bee Gees / Donna Summer / Village People - '70s records, because that's when the word was used to describe a STYLE of music - 120 -130 BPM's, 04 /4 beats, 12' singles etc etc. But of course Motown were making dance records before that - but not really in the accepted disco style of the 70's. The Supremes' "Love Is Like An Itching In My Heart" is pure disco really. The same has to be true of the Invictus set up - just an extention of the H/D/H Motown sound. And Gamble and Huff's Neptune label was turning out 45s in the late '60s that were a step away from the full blown Philadelphia International sound that came later. So they were all disco records - except they were not called that. So my definition of "disco" in this sense has to be a record that was SPECIFICALLY made to be danced to in a club. Therefore, I nominate Chubby Checker as the first Disco artist, Cameo/ Parkway as the first disco label and Chubby's version of The Twist as the first DISCO record. Not Hank Ballard's because Hank has a whole history before "The Twist" and it was just another release for him. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 02:28:16 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Modern Doo Wop Previously: > Aha! What other modern doo wop records are there? (What's modern? > I suppose anything from the last 20 years...) Bob Wallis: > An excellent contemporary Doo Wop group is Kenny Vance and the > Planotones. Kenny Vance was a founding member of Jay and the > Americans and can today sing falsetto like a New York angel. They > did the soundtrack singing for the 2000 movie "Looking for an Echo" > which is about a ficticious 50s doo wop group called "Vinnie and the > Dreamers". This is not a bunch of snot-nosed kids emulating the doo > wop sound - this is the real thing. Combined with modern recording > technology the sound from their CDs will give you goose-bumps! I checked out Kenny's cds listed at Amazon, and, alas, they seem to do versions of famous old songs all the time. So - is anyone writing NEW doo wop, or is that like asking if anyone has painted a new Pre- Raphaelite landscape recently? pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 10:40:29 -0000 From: David Blakey Subject: Bo Diddley's 75th birthday party Hey Bo Diddley fans! We are delighted to be able to announce the details of Bo Diddley's forthcoming 75th birthday party! One of the undisputed legends of rock & roll and a true original, Bo Diddley will be celebrating his 75th birthday live on-stage next month at the Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W. Burnside in Portland, OR. Joining him on-stage for the party will be the cream of the local blues music scene, the Portland Blues All-Stars. McMenamins, Portland's classic rock station KGON 92.3FM and The Cascade Blues Association will proudly present Bo Diddley's 75th birthday party live at Portland's historic Crystal Ballroom on Tuesday December 30th 2003 beginning at 7.00pm, (21 and over). Further details can be obtained by calling the Box Office Line on 503-225-0047 or the Info. Line on 503-225-5555 ext. 8811. The following evening, New Year's Eve, Bo Diddley will be performing live at Vibes Main One, One West Main St. in Medford, OR and on Friday January 2nd he will be at The Showbox, 1426 First Ave. in Seattle, WA along with the popular Seattle-based indie/grunge rock band Mudhoney. Further details of this gig can be obtained by calling the Info. Line on 206-628-3151. If you can't make it to any of the above shows, you can still send Bo Diddley your special 75th birthday greetings and messages. There are now several ways that you can do this: By signing the Bo Bo Diddley's Turnup Root official website's Guestbook which is located at http://www.turnup-root.com/boshouse.htm By signing the BO DIDDLEY-The Originator authorized website's Guestbook which is located at http://members.tripod.com/~Originator_2/guestbook.html Or by e-mailing your greetings directly to Bo Diddley himself at bodiddley@turnup-root.com Whichever way you choose to do it, you can rest assured that Bo Diddley will get to see each and every one of your messages. Also, be sure to check out your favorite syndicated, local and online blues and rock & roll radio shows during the month of December 2003, as we know that many DJs and presenters are currently planning special tribute programs to celebrate Bo Diddley's birthday. Finally, just a reminder that Bo Diddley 2004 wall calendars are now available for a limited time only. Produced to celebrate the forthcoming 50th anniversary of rock & roll and to honor one of its founding fathers, these high quality, one page 2004 wall calendars feature an exclusive "Bo Diddley - 50 Years of Rock & Roll" design and are printed on glossy, 10 point paper measuring 11" x 17". Located in the "Cards, Prints and More!" section of Bo Diddley's Online Store powered by CafePress.com which is located at http://www.cafeshops.com/bodiddley2 these official and exclusive Bo Diddley 2004 wall calendars are priced at just $6.95, plus shipping. David Blakey, Webmaster, Bo Bo Diddley's Turnup Root http://www.turnup-root.com/ The Official Bo Diddley Website. BO DIDDLEY-The Originator http://members.tripod.com/~Originator_2/index.html A Celebration of his unique contribution to Popular Music. Bo Diddley's Online Store http://www.cafeshops.com/bodiddley Exclusive, Limited Edition Bo Diddley Collectables. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 04:05:56 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: ISB pop / Doo wop Me: > Speaking as the moderator of the Incredible String Band Yahoogroup, > I'd say you your next purchase should be Wee Tam and the Big Huge. Country Paul: > ISB's "Air" is one of the most beautiful - and strangely mixed - songs > I know. It segues oddly well into "Ripple" by the Grateful Dead, too. > I'm going a bit far afield from our topic here, but to my ears those > were also among the most "pop" songs each band did. Nope! The Incredibles actually tried to get a hit single and appeared on Top of the Pops in 1973 - a ghastly thought, but true. The wannabe-hit- single was "At the Lighthouse Dance" - very bad! Me: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting > myself? Country Paul: > True, JB. But here's a suggestion, Paul: reverse import. The dollar > is still a good value compared to European currencies, and with > websites like Collectibles offering some serious sale items and > closeouts, even with overseas shipping the prices might be better > than locally in the UK. Of course, in Britain you've got those great > Ace and Rev-ola comps with cool liner notes by Mick Patrick and others > - and those cost a fortune over here. (Collectibles is not known for > its liner notes.) Thanks for all that!! pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 13:02:05 -0000 From: Fred Subject: Re: Wild Thing David Coyle wrote: > The other day, I was in a Sam Goody store, and I saw a clerk > wearing a button that said: "Q: Who Was The First Group To Cover > 'Wild Thing'?" Apparently Sam Goody's chain has a new pop music > trivia game for sale in its stores, and this was a tie-in. Do you > know how much it took for me to keep from saying "The Troggs" and > explaining how the Troggs had gotten it from a recording made by > an LA club band? (I forget who it was...) I thought it was a New York band, the Wild Ones, headed by Jordan Christopher. Jordan was previously the lead singer of Jordan and the Fascinations ("Once Upon A Time" [Carol]; "If You Love Me (Really Love Me)" [Dapt]). If Demo's count, the song's writer, Chip Taylor (brother of actor, Jon Voight), recorded a version, though I am uncertain if it ever saw commercial release. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 16:35:31 -0000 From: Stuart Miller Subject: Sinatra concept album Paul Bryant wrote: > So this sounds like the second concept album in one years to fail > spectacularly in which Bob Gaudio had a major hand - the other was > "Genuine Imitation Life gazette" by the 4 Seasons - this also > divides fans. Hi Paul, I have not been enamoured with Bob Gaudio at a personal level for some time now but I do feel I have to stand up for him here. "Watertown" was a very dour record as well as being very dark and quite frankly, totally depressing. But it was also exceptionally and profoundly different and in part, that will have put some people off - it just wasn't Sinatra's usual type of material. And that is exactly the same reason as to why "Genuine Imitation Life" was not as successful for the 4 Seasons as they would have liked. Too dramatic a departure for many of their fans. But there was one other problem with "Watertown". Sinatra wasn't happy with his voice at the time and insisted on doing everything live. And because of his voice, he didn't promote it. "Genuine Imitation" is not dark or gloomy. Radical departure it may have been but it is filled with truly excellent songs that more than stand the test of time. By this stage in their careers, the Seasons were pack chasers and were no longer setting the trends. Their problem was though that when they fixed on a genre to copy, they did it rather well. "Watch the Flowers Grow" (San Francisco '67), "Electric Stories" (rock), "Who Loves You" (disco and darn, that one slipped through and was a hit). I wouldn't say this album divides their fans. It's certainly a major talking point but most people realize that groups need to move on and when the Seasons did, it was spectacular. Gaudio had packed in by then nearly nine years of Seasons type hits and was sick of it. He'd earned the right to experiment and had earned the right to a failure, as the album is now viewed. But even that "failure" managed to sell 150,000 copies. Stuart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 16:28:19 -0000 From: Rob Subject: Sugaree - which version came first? Justin McDevitt asked about a great tune, and Ken Silverwood identified it as Sugaree by Rusty York. I got to digging around my collection, and found a version by Hank Ballard. My question is which one came first? It appears they were both released in 1959. I prefer the Hank Ballard offering myself. Enjoy Rob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 09:11:52 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Bob Seger Art Longmire wrote: > Not to mention "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" by Bob, which I remember > getting massive radio airplay on KFXM when I was in 7th grade in > Victorville, California...another example of a great tune on > top-40 back in the day that is IGNORED today! Prior to that, 02 + 2 = ? was a #1 record for around a month circa February 1968 in Buffalo, NY. I've tried to get oldies stations there to add it to their playlists, and one even told me it was a great idea, but maybe they just couldn't find a copy of it... Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 17:23:06 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Disco Rocks (on Ace Records) Speaking of prototype disco records, if you want to hear sixty (count 'em!) 60 of 'em, look no further than Rob Finnis's superb LAND OF 1,000 DANCES compilation, two volumes of which have been released on Ace Records and can be found at cduniverse.com and other online music outlets. These two CDs are spilling over with great rock 'n' roll dance music that was undoubtedly played in US discotheques in the '60s. I can't keep these gems out of my CD player for longer than a couple of weeks at a time. Track listings follow: VOLUME ONE 1. Harlem Shuffle - Bob/Earl (stereo) 2. Loco-Motion, The - Little Eva 3. Continental Walk, The - The Rollers 4. Hippy Hippy Shake - Chan Romero 5. Hanky Panky - Tommy James & The Shondells 6. Twist And Shout - The Isley Brothers (stereo) 7. Shag (Is Totally Cool), The - Billy Graves 8. Limbo Rock - The Champs 9. Madison, The - Al Brown's Tunetoppers (WAY COOL!) 10. Cool Jerk - The Capitols (stereo) 11. Monkey Time, The - Major Lance 12. Duck, The - Jackie Lee (stereo) 13. Willie And The Hand Jive - Johnny Otis 14. Walking The Dog - Rufus Thomas 15. Watusi, The - The Vibrations 16. Mashed Potatoes - Steve Alaimo (FAR OUT!) 17. Monster Mash - Bobby "Boris" Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers (stereo) 18. Stroll, The - The Diamonds 19. Push And Kick, The - Mark Valentino 20. Walk, The - Jimmy McCracklin 21. Peppermint Twist (part 1) - Joey Dee & The Starliters (stereo) 22. Hitch Hike Part 1 - Russell Byrd 23. Freeze, The - Tony/Joe 24. El Watusi - Ray Barretto 25. Ride Your Pony - Lee Dorsey (stereo - this was a radio staple in Kansas City during the '60s) 26. C'mon And Swim - Bobby Freeman (stereo) 27. (Baby) Hully Gully - The Olympics 28. Nitty Gritty, The - Shirley Ellis (stereo) 29. Land Of 1,000 Dances - Cannibal & The Headhunters (this Chicano group had a gay lead singer, for those interested in that kind of thing) 30. Let's Dance - Chris Montez (stereo) VOLUME TWO 1. Mickey's Monkey - The Miracles (stereo) 2. Let's Stomp - Bobby Comstock 3. Twist, The - Hank Ballard & The Midnighters 4. Loop De Loop - Johnny Thunder (stereo) 5. Jerk, The - The Larks 6. 81, The - Candy And The Kisses (mono, despite what the packaging claims) 7. Madison Time (Part 1), The - Ray Bryant Combo (WAY COOL!) 8. Bounce, The - The Olympics 9. Lurch, The - Ted Cassidy (SUPER COOL!) 10. Bird Is The Word, The - The Rivingtons 11. Foot Stomping (Part 1) - The Flares 12. Twine Time - Alvin Cash 13. Shake A Tail Feather - The Du-Tones (a jam and a half!) 14. Shimmy Shimmy, (I Do The) - Bobby Freeman 15. Cool Shake - The Del-Vikings (GREAT!) 16. Cinnamon Cinder (It's A Very Nice Dance) - The Pastel Six 17. Roach, The - Gene & Wendell/The Sweethearts (Dance) (UNBELIEVABLE - with Carolyn Willis on backing vocals) 18. Shake The, (Make With) - The Mark IV 19. Crawl, The - Guitar Junior 20. Crusher, The - The Novas (listeners of "The Dr. Demento Show" will recall this one fondly) 21. Bacon Fat - Andre Williams 22. Wobble, The - Curtis Lee 23. Pop-Eye - Huey Smith 24. Barefootin' - Robert Parker 25. Skate Now - Lou Courtney (two jams and a half!) 26. Land Of 1000 Dance (The Na Na Song) - Round Robin 27. Twist, Twist Senora! - Gary US Bonds 28. Baby Workout - Jackie Wilson (stereo) 29. Twistin' USA - Danny & The Juniors 30. Guitar Man, (Dance With) The - Duane Eddy & The Rebelettes (stereo - featuring Miss Darlene) All Finnis needs to complete this series is a Cameo-Parkway edition . . . but I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for that. Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 12:35:02 -0000 From: Fred Subject: Re: The First Disco Rekkid I agree with the Jamaican Reggae/Ska influence to what Disco was or became, though most of what I recall were slower in tempo, ...Disco was more upbeat. As for earlier than Disco era recordings, a definite Disco sound is evident in a recording from 1966 by Tommy Vann and the Echoes on Academy Records (remember "Pretty Flamingo"?). It was the old standard of "Too Young", and sounds ahead of it's time. I could definitely hear it being played on Denny Terrio's(sp) "Dance Fever" with no problem, mirrored ball and all. The constant upbeat thump beat from the beginning, the horny background, etc., ...it's all there. Another contender, though later (from 1969), is one by the Intrigues called "In A Moment" on Yew Records. Listening to it now, the Disco sound is there, but not as much as in the Vann record. One must also remember that the term "Disco" was still 5-10 years away from being coined to describe the sound, so the above two were recorded without the intent of really being "Disco". There was no follow up link connecting it to the Disco Era. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:35:36 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Beatles > Right! I have an aircheck of WKYC in Cleveland on which all four > tracks from the UK Rubber Soul left off of the US version are played. > They had done the same thing earlier with "I've Just Seen a Face" > and "It's Only Love" from the UK "Help!" album. I love talking about those first times I heard Beatles songs. My brothers and I lived for being the first to tape new Beatles recordings! My first taste of this was in early 64. We taped the first Ed Sullivan appearance thru a line feed from out Tv speaker. My dad was an electrician of sorts and a ham radio operator, so he got us good patches for Tv and radio. We caught the last few songs of a "live" over KYW Beatles concert (altho it sounded strangely like screaming laid over released Beatles cuts!) in early 64. Then from an unknown station, "What'd I Say" by the Pete Best Beatles. First heard "Beatles VI" on KOMA when there in 65. As mentioned above, the "UK Bonus" cuts from "Help!" on WKYC got taped off WLS by us. Particularly interesting was late 68, when WLS played "Hey Bulldog" and "You're too Much" (their title for it and a 3:21 edit version of "It's All too Much") as new cuts from the forthcoming new Beatles Lp "recorded in India containing 22 cuts". Soon withdrawn by WLS, it stayed on our tapes as the White Album soon came and went without their inclusion. We finally got them on "Yellow Sub". Yet, the 22 track comment was nearly right for the White Lp! Then, Wichita's KEYN-FM played the "Get Back" album in its' entireity over the air in November 69, saying it would be released in Jan 70. "Hey Jude" the Lp came & went without these great tracks. Finally, some 6 months later we got orchestrated versions. So, I actually heard the "Get Back" versions first. That is why my heart is with those versions. I don't like the kinda wimpy vocal on "Let it be Naked" on "Long & Winding Road", but love getting those "Get Back" versions like "Two of Us". Anyway, it was a lot of fun spinning the dial in the 60's awaiting the new Beatles tracks! Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:37:02 -0000 From: Fred Subject: Re: Sugaree - which version came first? Rob wrote: > Justin McDevitt asked about a great tune, and Ken Silverwood > identified it as Sugaree by Rusty York. I got to digging around my > collection, and found a version by Hank Ballard. My question is > which one came first? It appears they were both released in 1959. I > prefer the Hank Ballard offering myself. Both the York version on Chess and the Midnighters on King seem to date from around June of 1959. The York Chess issue was definitely no later than June, as it was reviewed in Billboard that month. However, the York version was previously issued on Note Records (definitely 1959), and then PJ Records before that (some speculate that it could be as early as 1957 or 1958, but there is nothing conclusive to prove it). If you note the writer was Marty Robbins, who also recorded a version, but it went unreleased. Also note it is not stated WHEN he recorded it (it could have been years after the other two). Fred -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:41:39 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Hollies Billy G. Spradlin wrote: > Imperial finally scored a USA hit with "Look Through Any Window". I > think it's interesting to note many USA oldies stations still play > it regularly now though it only made it to #32 in January 1966 - 04 > months after it was released in the UK in August 1965. Billy, "Look Thru Any Window" beacme my fave song of the 60's when it was released in 65. Today, I would have to count it as in my top 5 fer sure. Don't ask me why, but everytime I hear those opening notes, I think of my tape of it off WLS' Dex Card show (where it reached #3)with Dex belting out "Here are the Hollies on 8-9-0 a go go!". A great great song! WLS even played "If I Needed Someone"! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 18:34:25 -0000 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Beverley Sisters - there were never such devoted.... > Dave Heasman, thanks for the note on the Beverley Sisters. With their > resurgence, do you know if "For You" or anything else in that style is > available on CD? HMV has nothing but: BEVERLEY SISTERS The Very Best Of 5.99 TRACKLISTING 1. Willie Can 2. I Dreamed 3. Little Drummer Boy 4. Little Donkey 5. Have You Ever Been Lonely? 6. Sisters 7. Left Right Out Of Your Heart 8. Mr Wonderful 9. Long Black Nylons 10. Strawberry Fair 11. Morning Has Broken 12. It's Illegal, It's Immoral' Or It Makes You Fat 13. If Anyone Finds This, I Love You 14. Greensleeves 15. I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus 16. The Naughty Lady Of Shady Lane 17. Little Things Mean A Lot 18. Somebody Bad Stole De Wedding Bell 19. We Like To Do Things Like That 20. The Mama Doll Song 21. Triplets 22. Changing Partners As you can see, they're largely covers of early 50s just-pre-rock n roll songs. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 19:01:31 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Gary Usher and Dick Campbell I wrote: > I really enjoyed the Gary Usher/Dick Campbell clip on musica. Good > stuff! Thanks for sharing it with us! Gary: > Actually I don't believe the song in musica was related to Gary Usher. > It was a take off of a song written by a friend of Dick's called > "Backroads" that Dick modified for this Honda commercial. I posted > it because I saw someone request that people post 60s commercials in > musica. Dick won an international broadcasting award from the > Hollywood Radio and Television Society - the award honoring the > world's best broadcast advertisement of 1972. Thanks for the info, Gary! I figured it was post 60's, but early 70's. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 14:35:52 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time) From: Paul Balser Subject: Re: Sugaree - which version came first? Rob: > Justin McDevitt asked about a great tune, and Ken Silverwood > identified it as Sugaree by Rusty York. I got to digging around my > collection, and found a version by Hank Ballard. My question is > which one came first? It appears they were both released in 1959. I > prefer the Hank Ballard offering myself. Rusty York's version, recorded 7/20/59 . -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 16:49:32 -0500 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Bob Seger Tom Taber wrote: > Prior to that, 02 + 2 == ? was a #1 record for around a month circa > February 1968 in Buffalo, NY. I've tried to get oldies stations > there to add it to their playlists, and one even told me it was a > great idea, but maybe they just couldn't find a copy of it... Yes, it's nearly impossible to find either the single or album mixes on CD. Bob Radil from the Usenet discussion groups did a doctored combo job, grafting the dissonant chord from the 2:20 mark from the single onto the album mix (where that spot was silent for several seconds). The end result is a stereo-friendly version that would appeal to listeners from the old AM radio days: e-mail me and I'll get you hooked up with a copy. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2003 14:45:51 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Seasons' psychedelia Paul: > So this sounds like the second concept album in > one years to fail spectacularly in which Bob Gaudio > had a major hand - the other was "Genuine Imitation Life > Gazette" by the 4 Seasons - this also divides fans. Stuart responded: > ......"Watertown" was a very dour record as well as being > very dark and quite frankly, totally depressing. But it > was also exceptionally and profoundly different and in part, > that will have put some people off - it just wasn't Sinatra's > usual type of material........ > > ...."Genuine Imitation" is not dark or gloomy. Radical > departure it may have been but it is filled with truly > excellent songs that more than stand the test of time. > By this stage in their careers, the Seasons were pack > chasers and were no longer setting the trends. Their > problem was though that when they fixed on a genre to > copy, they did it rather well. "Watch the Flowers Grow" > (San Francisco '67), "Electric Stories" (rock), "Who > Loves You" (disco and darn, that one slipped through > and was a hit). > > I wouldn't say this album divides their fans. It's > certainly a major talking point but most people realize > that groups need to move on and when the Seasons did, it > was spectacular. Gaudio had packed in by then nearly nine > years of Seasons type hits and was sick of it. He'd > earned the right to experiment and had earned the right to > a failure, as the album is now viewed. But even that > "failure" managed to sell 150,000 copies. I appreciate your sentiments - now I have to find a copy of "Watertown"! As regards "Watch the Flowers Grow" being the Seasons'"hippy" or "psychedelic" attempt - I agree. The new psychedelic stuff made quite a few established pop acts look out of date, & some reacted by trying desperately to look groovy. The Supremes' "Reflections", with those slightly silly space-age bleeps, is another example but I'm sure there are others! I got the idea that the "Gazette" album divided the fans because I briefly joined a Seasons mailing list and was surprised at how hardcore fans hated it like poison. (And the first long obviously-influenced-by- Macarthur Park "Great American Crucifixion" song is pure embarrassment. But the rest's pretty good.) pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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