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Spectropop - Digest Number 1127



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Soft Sounds For Gentle People  Vol 2 CD
           From: JJ 
      2. Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe
           From: Ken Silverwood 
      3. Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe
           From: Eddy 
      4. Re: Modern Doo Wop
           From: Paul Balser 
      5. Re: Need help with song title/artist
           From: Ken Silverwood 
      6. Re: Beatles No 2s
           From: Andrew Hickey 
      7. Re: Soft Sounds For Gentle People  Vol 2 CD
           From: Orion 
      8. Re: Modern Doo Wop
           From: Bob Wallis 
      9. Re: Estelle and Nedra Christmas songs
           From: Sean 
     10. Re: Modern Doo Wop
           From: Bob Wallis 
     11. Let It Be...Filmed
           From: David Coyle 
     12. Re: Bob Seger
           From: Art Longmire 
     13. BeatlesBeatleBeatles
           From: Albabe Gordon 
     14. Rev-ola CD "The Deep Six"
           From: Ian Slater 
     15. Wild Thing / The Hollies
           From: David Coyle 
     16. Let It Friggin' Be
           From: Albabe Gordon 
     17. The First Disco Rekkid
           From: James Botticelli 
     18. Re: Needles And Pins and Jackie DeShannon
           From: Albabe Gordon 
     19. now playing at musica...
           From: Bill George 
     20. Re: Modern Doo Wop
           From: Natasha McNamee 
     21. Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe
           From: Paul Bryant 


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Message: 1 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 11:41:43 -0000 From: JJ Subject: Soft Sounds For Gentle People Vol 2 CD **Anybody seen this CD?? I cannot get hold of the maker, so... JJ/Sweden -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 11:05:35 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe Dave Heasman wrote: > ("Across The Universe") was first released in 1966 on a > charity LP in England. Yeah, wasn't it for wildlife or RSPB or the likes? I seem to remember it had sketches of the artists who donated tracks to the LP on the front cover. Another artist on it was Rolf Harris. Don't think it would have been as early as 1966 though. Ken On The West Coast. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 11:46:56 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe Dave Heasman: > ("Across The Universe") was first released in 1966 on a > charity LP in England. That would be "No One's Gonna Change Our World", which is a December 1969 release (UK only), which also includes the otherwise unavailable "Wings" by the Hollies. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:10:24 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time) From: Paul Balser Subject: Re: Modern Doo Wop Paul Bryant enquired: > Aha! What other modern doo wop records are there? > (What's modern? I suppose anything from the last 20 > years...) One of the best groups that perform & record today are the Van-Dells. 50s/60s & Doo Wop. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 10:59:11 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Need help with song title/artist Justin McDevitt: > To my question: A few nights ago, I was listening to the oldies > channel included in the specific satellite package that I subscribe > to. Just after listening to a great recording of Bobby Freeman's > Betty Lou's Got A New Pair Of Shoes, a song was played that I really > enjoyed; (a real rocker). In all the years I've been listening to > rock 'n roll, I've never heard this track. Based on the lyrics, I > believe that the song is title Sugaree. Hi Justin, The song is indeed "Sugaree". It's by Rusty York on Chess 1730 & was written by Marty Robbins c 1959. It reached #77 in US charts & you're right, it's a great romp! I think it is included on one of Ace's "Golden Age Of American Rock'n 'roll" volumes. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 18:24:52 +0100 From: Andrew Hickey Subject: Re: Beatles No 2s Someone reported that: > (The Beatles reached No.2 with) Please Please Me (in) Jan 1963 (and > that) No.1 was The Wayward Wind by Frank Ifield But Please Please Me *was* number one in most charts in the UK. Just not all of them. Earth Song by Michael Jackson kept Free As A Bird from No.1, IIRC. Robson & Jerome kept Anthology 1 from No.1. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 12:44:29 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: Soft Sounds For Gentle People Vol 2 CD JJ asked about Soft Sounds For Gentle People Vol 2 CD: > Anybody seen this CD?? I cannot get hold of the maker, so... It was just offered on ebay. I purchased a copy of it. $12.99 plus shipping I believe. Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 18:47:39 -0000 From: Bob Wallis Subject: Re: Modern Doo Wop Previously: > Aha! What other modern doo wop records are there? (What's modern? I > suppose anything from the last 20 years...) An excellent contemporary Doo Wop group is Kenny Vance and the Planotones. Kenny Vance was a founding member of Jay and the Americans and can today sing falsetto like a New York angel. They did the soundtrack singing for the 2000 movie "Looking for an Echo" which is about a ficticious 50s doo wop group called "Vinnie and the Dreamers". This is not a bunch of snot- nosed kids emulating the doo wop sound - this is the real thing. Combined with modern recording technology the sound from their CDs will give you goose-bumps! Bob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 18:56:55 -0000 From: Sean Subject: Re: Estelle and Nedra Christmas songs Thanks! I had a feeling they were on "Sleigh Ride". Where can I find "Mashed Potato Time" and "The Twist"? I heard somewhere both of these songs were on Crystals albums! Also which parts are Nedra and Estelle singing on "Breakin Up" because there a lot of different background parts, or are they singing all of them? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 20:41:41 -0000 From: Bob Wallis Subject: Re: Modern Doo Wop I wrote: > An excellent contemporary Doo Wop group is Kenny Vance and the > Planotones. Kenny Vance was a founding member of Jay and the > Americans and can today sing falsetto like a New York angel. They > did the soundtrack singing for the 2000 movie "Looking for an Echo" > which is about a ficticious 50s doo wop group called "Vinnie and the > Dreamers". This is not a bunch of snot-nosed kids emulating the doo > wop sound - this is the real thing. Combined with modern recording > technology the sound from their CDs will give you goose-bumps! Woah, I forgot to mention that Garry Bonner is involved with the Planotones as well - right "That" Alan (who says the old Park Street Diner in nearby Ayer, Massachusetts is where the song "Happy together" was born)? I digress.... Bob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:10:28 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Let It Be...Filmed I think the whole reason that the movie "Let It Be" has been branded as a "sad" film is because it really does show the Beatles getting on each other's nerves and becoming uninspired by the process of recording with each other. And it is a document of the band breaking up. It may not have looked so much that way at the time the film was released, but with the perspective of 30-plus years, one realizes just how sad it is. Maybe it's just because the band broke up, never got back together, and now never will, because half of them are dead. Of course, and this is where my opinion might get panned, I've only seen the film once, on a grainy bootleg video tape back in the early '90s. It's one of those movies which should have been shown on one of AMC's movie preservation festivals or as one of VH-1's "Movies That Rock." Now, more than ever, it needs to be re-released on DVD. It might change my mind. It might change a lot of minds. It also doesn't make it any different that the last part of the "Beatles Anthology" also is sad in that you can tell the end is near in more ways than one. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 21:16:34 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Bob Seger Clark Besch wrote: > When all that fantastic Cameo/Parkway stuff of his sits unreleased, > the piece of crap ("Old Time") continues to be praised on oldies > radio. Bill Brown: > I cannot believe that "Feel Like A Number" is not included in Bob > Seger's recent greatest hits collection either, but who knows what > these people are thinking when they put these collections together? Not to mention "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" by Bob, which I remember getting massive radio airplay on KFXM when I was in 7th grade in Victorville, California...another example of a great tune on top-40 back in the day that is IGNORED today! Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:19:36 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: BeatlesBeatleBeatles David Coyle on Let It Be...Naked: > One of Spector's 1970 touches that I never really minded were the > false starts and bits of studio..." Great review, David. As for the above quote: The "bits" etc. weren't Spector's, as some were in the original version of the album prepared by Geof Emerick (Now available at all reliable Bootlegger's outlets everywhere). I've also seen it called "The Martin Mix," which I believe is untrue. As for the cover: I wasn't crazy about it. I thought it looked like a cheapo "Target" special reissue from a lessor talent. > Could this be ushering in the near-future possibility of seeing the > "Let It Be" movie given full release... There is a two disc version of the Let It Be movie that's been appearing on eBay for about a year or so, that I've heard is of pretty phenomenal quality. It has at least another hour of extra material too. The rumour is that someone "acquired" the master tapes for the official release, and that this boot is similar to what the eventual official release will be: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3364662744&category=41544 If anyone has this and can burn a copy, I'd love to trade for something. (I can say that since it's a boot... right?) A good friend of mine has been working really close with Paul McCartney for the last couple of years, and it has been said by Paul that Let It Be will be out soon... whatever "soon" means. It was originally slated for this Christmas, but is now (according to I.C.E) set up for next year. > ...acoustic White Album... I never heard about this being released. That would be great. There are some decent quality versions of this available as a boots. > ...Live At The Hollywood Bowl... I've also heard that there is a mix of this that was prepared by George Martin a few years back. I would love to hear this remastered with today's standards. I was in a record store last year that was playing some really amazing Live Beatles boots that sounded pretty great and were darn good performances too...much better and more rockin' than the Hollywood Bowl. I don't know what they were, and since I couldn't afford them, I didn't file to memory what they were. These would be the ones to release. best stuff, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 21:28:04 -0000 From: Ian Slater Subject: Rev-ola CD "The Deep Six" Recent messages have included several about the new releases on the Rev-Ola label. I'd like to add mention of the "Deep Six" CD (Rev-Ola cr rev 46) and thank Steve Stanley and Cherry Red records for re- issuing this folk-rock group's entire previous catalogue, together with a very informative and well-llustrated information sheet. It's a nice collection but the stand-out tracks for me are "Unlock the Door" with Dean Cannon singing lead, and their version of the doo-wop classic "Image of a Girl", which is a showcase for the group's beautiful harmonies. I have an unissued two-track acetate by the group which I'll try to upload to Musica some time. There was discussion about the Deep Six & Dean Cannon in these pages in May, compiled in Digests 892 - 895. Ian Slater -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:28:43 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Wild Thing / The Hollies The other day, I was in a Sam Goody store, and I saw a clerk wearing a button that said: "Q: Who Was The First Group To Cover 'Wild Thing'?" Apparently Sam Goody's chain has a new pop music trivia game for sale in its stores, and this was a tie-in. Do you know how much it took for me to keep from saying "The Troggs" and explaining how the Troggs had gotten it from a recording made by an LA club band? (I forget who it was...) Re: "In The Hollies Style" is probably one of the best, if not THE best, non-Beatles British beat LPs of the era. There are so many great songs on the album, starting with the medley of "Nitty Gritty/Something's Got A Hold On Me" which is a great kickoff. Very live sounding. Not a lot of hits on the LP, but great music nonetheless. One of my favorite is "You'll Be Mine," an understated number with 12-string acoustic guitar, complete with solo. "Please Don't Feel Too Bad" is a great beat ballad, which was referred to simply as "workmanlike" when it later appeared on "Not The Hits Again," which is a good compendium of the Hollies lesser- known tracks of the 1963-66 era. Some of the best numbers of the beat group era were workmanlike, in my opinion. Then there was "What Kind Of Boy," written specifically for the band by US soul singer Big Dee Irwin. You can almost imagine the Hollies standing offstage at Wembley Stadium in 1964 being taught the song by Irwin when they all played the NME Pollwinner's Concert. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 14:00:11 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: Let It Friggin' Be Just thought I'd post this again so that all the opinions and such, can be resolved without fisticuffs and bloodshed: Let It Be... Naked Fans: There is a nice track-by-track detail of which takes were used and what was done to them, in the latest issue of I.C.E. (#201). I.C.E. posts all their magazine articles on their site about a month after the magazine hits the stands. A good read. ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 17:37:46 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: The First Disco Rekkid Stuffed Animal wrote: > The cut "Take My Love" from Honey Cone's TAKE ME WITH YOU album is > the earliest example I can find of true, pure disco music. It > appeared in 1969! Take a listen to the Delfonics 1968 debut LP "La La Means I Love You". They do an uptempo Philadelphia-styled version of--I think--"Hurt So Bad" by Little Anthony. I submit that to be the first disco record as disco is generally thought to be a spinoff (pun intended) of Philly soul. Invictus and Hot Wax was really Motown spinoff stuff to my ears and Motown soundalikes was what was played at sixties discotheques. That's really what "Northern Soul" is, lost discotheque rekkids. A book worth checking by the way is "Last Night A DJ Saved My Life". Two Brits wrote it. Its the bible on the history of DJ culture the roots of which were formed in Jamaica. A page turner. And lots on discotheque/ jet set culture. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:54:42 -0800 From: Albabe Gordon Subject: Re: Needles And Pins and Jackie DeShannon Peter Lerner on Needles And Pins: > Glenn confirms what I always suspected, that Jackie DeShannon had > a hand in writing "Needles and Pins." I remember reading somewhere that Jackie didn't "have a hand" in the writing of "Needles and Pins." I heard that "she" wrote it... period ... and that she "traded" half of it to Sonny Boy. It's been alleged for years that Phil Spector expected a writers credit on some songs because he figured they would be nothing before they were "Spectorized." Sonny had a good teacher in ways other than production. If true, that doesn't make Sonny a songwriter... it makes him a business man. I have heard over the years that Lennon was inspired listening to Jackie work out the intro lick on one of her new songs ("When You Walk In The Room"?) enough to write "Ticket To Ride." They do sound somewhat similar. Apocryphal? peace, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 17:51:38 EST From: Bill George Subject: now playing at musica... I've added the third and final song from Jackie DeShannon's 1968 album Me About You, written by Bonner & Gordon, called "I'm With You." Enjoy. Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 23:46:12 +0000 (GMT) From: Natasha McNamee Subject: Re: Modern Doo Wop Paul Bryant wrote: > Aha! What other modern doo wop records are there? > (What's modern? I suppose anything from the last 20 > years...) The Crystalairs are a German group who do some gorgeous stuff like "Mr Moon", "Never Such Love", all with lovely harmonies. I get their stuff off Kazaa but you can buy their CDs from the likes of http://www.bim-bam.com etc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 15:48:49 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked / Across The Universe Dave Heasman wrote: > ("Across The Universe") was first released in 1966 > on a charity LP in England. Recorded in February 1968 and briefly considered as the next single before McCartney wrote "Lady Madonna" (he had a habit of coming up with the singles in the Beatles' latter years), "Across the Universe" then lay around for over a year before being given to the World Wildlife Fund who issued it on an album in December '69 called "No One's Gonna Change Our World" (ironic title if ever there was one). Then Phil Spector was given the tapes when he was hired to do "Let it Be". He slowed the track right down and added strings and choir. The first (Feb '68) version was the first time the Beatles had used female voices on one of their records - this a famous story. It turned out that the fabs couldn't sing the high parts, so in the spirit of the times McCartney went outside and grabbed two of the female fans who were always hanging around outside the studio. So they had their 15 minutes of fame. The "Across the Universe" comparison would therefore be between the version on Let it Be...Naked and the one on Past Masters Vol 2. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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