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Spectropop - Digest Number 1126



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Let It Be...Naked / Revolution In The Head
           From: Paul Bryant 
      2. Re: Let It Be...Naked
           From: Laura Pinto 
      3. the return of......
           From: Artie Wayne 
      4. The Forum
           From: Joe 
      5. Italian Mice, Cross-gender songs
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      6. Re: Half tones
           From: jerophonic 
      7. Hung On You; Twist & Shout; Gasolin'
           From: Country Paul 
      8. Re: Righteous Brothers on Haven
           From: Glenn 
      9. Re: Needles And Pins
           From: Glenn 
     10. Re: L.A. Smoke
           From: Eddy 
     11. Re: Let It Be...Naked
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     12. New @ musica: Kim Carnes / The Guilloteens
           From: S'pop Projects 
     13. The Off Set
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     14. Who are THESE Warlocks?
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     15. Re: Need help with song title/artist
           From: Paul Balser 
     16. Re: Bob Seger
           From: Bill Brown 
     17. Disco Rocks
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     18. Re: The Beatles in the charts
           From: Paul Bryant 
     19. Re: Need help with song title/artist
           From: Rat Pfink 
     20. Re: Beatles No 2s
           From: Richard Hattersley 
     21. Re: L.A. Smoke
           From: Rat Pfink 
     22. DA DOO RON RON Xmas Shindig Sat 20th December, Brighton
           From: Chris King 
     23. Re: Gary Usher and Dick Campbell
           From: Gary 
     24. Modern Doo Wop
           From: Paul Bryant 
     25. Fading Yellow Vols 6 & 7 -  Feedback!!
           From: JJ 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 15:37:46 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked / Revolution In The Head All Beatle fans and Spectropoppers alike should have by their beds a copy of Revolution in the Head by Ian Macdonald, the best book about the Fabs & a good shot at the best book on pop music ever. On page 296 we read "Harrison added a Leslie-toned guitar solo to take 27 of Let It be on 30 April, after which, like most of the January 1969 material, it was left to accumulate dust for the rest of the year. Exhumed at the beginning of 1970, it was given a second, more organised solo with fuzz-tone, some high harmonised backing vocals by McCartney and Harrison, extra drums, maracas, and a George Martin score for brass and cellos. These extra instruments, virtually inaudible on the single, are mixed higher on the album, where Harrison's second solo is preferred." [Note - if you don't know already, Ian Macdonald died a couple of months ago.] pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 23:53:28 -0000 From: Laura Pinto Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked David Coyle wrote: > Actually, the version of "Let It Be" on the new Beatles CD is a > different version. I can't think right off hand without having the > disc to listen to what the main differences are, but I do remember > some distinct lyrical changes, and when you've listened to a familiar > song thousands of times, you can tell where different adlibs and > interjections ("oohs," "uhs," and "whoas" for instance) have been > added or left out when the singer does a different version. Yes, you can tell the take on "Let it Be" differs slightly from that used on the 1970 release; for example, the way Paul sings, "Oh, let it be" (with the interjection of "oh" that didn't exist on the original version), and some of the vocal nuances. "The Long and Winding Road" uses a completely different take as well. > I got mine at KMart for $9.99. The highest price I saw for it > anywhere else was $15.99...so I'm not complaining. Thanks for the info! Went to my local K-Mart today and got a rain check, as they were sold clean out. I don't have the CD yet; I heard the album broadcast in its entirety last week on my local oldies station as part of The Infinity Broadcasting Network special on the making of the CD. Without getting into too much detail or saying what's already been said, my personal opinion is this: I like "Long and Winding Road" and "Across the Universe" better with the orchestration and background vocals (but that is a real cool fadeout at the end of the latter song on the "Naked" album); every other track I like better in the stripped version. Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 06:18:13 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: the return of...... I wanted to drop a note to thank all of you for your support during this difficult part of my life. It's been a month since I stopped taking prescribed pain killers, which I've used every day since my spinal operation six years ago. It hasn't been easy, but prayer and deep meditation techniques I've been developing allow me to function from below the pain level and deal with life with a clear head. Thirty years ago I wrote a song ,"From the Inside", for my late Grandmother who still is one of my biggest inspirations. She'd always say to me, "Go on boy.......You can do it!! It's only life....There's nothin' to it......Just the seein' through it......From the Inside." It's been recorded by Yvonne Elliman, Lynn Anderson, Marcia Hines, Vicki Brown and Cilla Black. I asked my friend Allan Rinde to post the demo Kim Carnes did for me. Whenever I hear it......it never fails to make me push a little harder. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 02:14:54 -0000 From: Joe Subject: The Forum Richard Williams: > New converts to the Forum might care to note that track 1 of > their fascinating Rev-Ola CD is not, as labelled, the original > single mix of "The River is Wide". That mix is to be found on > track 14, which is erroneously labelled "Tell The World". > Track 1 is longer, with a completely different intro, and must > be an extended version from the original LP (which I've never > heard). Incidentally, my London-American promo 45 of "The River > Is Wide" has a UK release date of March 1967, but a copyright > date of 1966. I didn't notice any explaination: Apparently tracks 1, 18 and 19 are different mixes of the unedited master with slightly different fadeouts. The original regional release (Penthouse 504) basically had this version but with the "can't you feel it baby" bridge edited out and a slightly longer fadeout than what's on the CD. Mira 232 was remixed, replacing the intro with an instrumental mixdown of the second chorus from the words "drop of rain", then vocal back up for the bridge and spooled back to the second verse. If that wasn't confusing enough, the Mira reissue pressings (blue label) are slightly different from the original black label ones. These keep all three fadeout choruses at full volume then quickly fadeout on a previously unheard fourth. The compression is also different in this mix - when the vocal kicks in the backing tracks almost vanish. Thanks for having me aboard. Joe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2003 22:32:40 EST From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Italian Mice, Cross-gender songs I thought it was Lou Monte who brought Pepino, his "novelty", on Ed Sullivan....Rolf Harris would more likely have been featured with a kangaroo or a koala. Donovan's "Ballad of Geraldine" may be sung by the folk poet, but clearly he's telling it from her point of view, not to get too technical here. I'll throw some salt into the stew here with another hypothetical cross- gender. Group from Greece (I think) called the Off-Set was signed to Jubilee in '66. Their B-side "Xanthia (Lisa)" if I'm interpreting the lyrics correctly is being sung by one guy to another (unless it's just my own fantasy :--((!!!) and toward the end of this otherwise delightfully psychedelic piece, says to him, "I asked if it be worth the pain that I might endure/After I heard his reply I began to realize our love was gone for sure." This could easily be interpreted in several different ways; he could be singing to "Lisa" about an encounter he had with her boyfriend. I'm not holding my breath because this is an incredibly rare recording, although I'm sure somebody on the group is familiar with it. Although-- who really cares! Dr. Demento over the years has aired some of the most derogatory gay satire records including Steve Greenberg's "Big Bad Bruce" (Big Bad John) and a parody of John Hartford's "Hey Babe, Ya Wanna Boogie?' (Say, Guy, Ya Wanna Boogie?"). Then you have guys like Jim Stafford ("My Girl Bill") who deliberately mislead the listener..... And now, back to Let It Be, Jackie, Leslie and Dusty! Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 05:55:06 -0000 From: jerophonic Subject: Re: Half tones Steve Harvey wrote: > Often to add some excitement musicians will raise a verse up a keep. > Starting in the key of A they switch to the key of A#. Same chord > progressions, but just raise a half tone each time. Right. Moving up a half step can be integrated smoothly into the arrangement, or done for cheap effect. Actually, Bobby Hebb's "Sunny", discussed elsewhere, is another example of a song with no chorus or bridge which smartly moves up a half step after each verse (as I recall). It takes a singer with range to handle the multiple key changes. In the cheap effects department, listen to the climax of Climax's "Precious and Few". The key change is just a substitute for real passion. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 01:39:37 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Hung On You; Twist & Shout; Gasolin' Back to being way behind, so I'll try to catch up selectively.... Richard Hattersley: > [H]ow many average joes have even heard of Hung On You. It was the originally the A side, and got considerable airplay in New York before "Unchained Melody" "won" the battle. "Hung" is a superb composition and performance, perhaps my favorite single RB track. David Coyle: > While the original Isley Brothers version of "Twist And Shout" may be > more danceable than the Beatles version, there's no question that the > latter is a stomping powerhouse. Paul Bryant: > Likewise their "Money" which surely beats the original. I beg to differ. The Beatles' versions are indeed stomping powerhouses, but the slop beat of Barrett Strong's original "Money' has the groove to my ears. Incidentally, I've had the privilege of hearing the Top Notes original "Twist and Shout," and I confess to having a new favorite version. It's faster, has an actual bridge and song structure, and really drives. It's like an old friend I took for granted suddenly being a lot cooler than I thought! Thanks, David Young. I really like the Gasolin' track ("Kvinde Min"); thanks, Kwan, for playing it to musica. What's the song about? Can anyone on board do a Danish>English translation, please? "Caught up" to within one week - more soon. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 08:46:34 -0000 From: Glenn Subject: Re: Righteous Brothers on Haven Me: > While the Righteous Brothers' version of "Substitute" (which indeed > was the original version -- Willie Harry Wilson was a staff writer and > artist for Haven) was released ON Haven 7014, it was NOT the A-side of > the single. The A-side was a cover of the Coasters' "Young Blood", > which I actually heard played for a couple of weeks on a radio station > in D.C. So "Substitute" was the flip side, which is not the same as > being "released as a single". Peter Richmond replied: > According to Haven Records at the time, Haven 7014 "Substitute"/"Young > Blood" was released as a double A side. Well, that's what I get for disagreeing with a Righteous Brothers expert! :) I do have some memory of this, that both sides were considered hit candidates. But I also recall Billboard only listing the single as "Young Blood" on its Singles Reviews page. Plus, when it was out, I met and became friends with the Haven promotion man for the mid-Atlantic area, and he told me that "Young Blood" was the side being pushed. And, as I stated before, it was the side played on the radio, at least around here. BTW, I thought they did a great version of that Coasters song! It didn't sound dated at all. Shoulda been a hit. > Have you any details of any further unreleased Righteous Brothers tracks > from their Haven days, I know of four that surfaced in the early 90's, > the Lambert/Potter produced "Hey Girl" (Goffin/King) and "If That's The > Way You Want It" (Lambert/Potter) plus the two Bill Medley/Art Munson > produced "Father Of The Rock N Roll" (Medley) and "Happy Song" (Medley). Wow, I didn't even know about those four! Where did they surface? I'd especially like to hear their version of "If That's The Way You Want It", which was originally recorded by Diamond Head on ABC/Dunhill (Diamond Head later signed to Haven) and covered by Tavares on Capitol. No, sorry, I don't know of any unreleased RB Haven tracks that emerged later. Wish I did. The Canadian CD "Rock and Roll Heaven" claimed that two of its tracks were previously unreleased, but those two had actually been released on a Haven single "Hold On To What You've Got"/"Let Me Make the Music". Glenn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 09:34:23 -0000 From: Glenn Subject: Re: Needles And Pins Peter Lerner wrote: > Glenn confirms what I always suspected, that Jackie DeShannon > had a hand in writing "Needles and Pins" Wow, I knew that posting this news would shatter some people's illusions, but I'm glad that it made at least one person happy! Steve Harvey wrote: > I'm beginning to wonder if Sonny actually wrote much of anything. The > riff for "The Beat Goes On" was thought up by Carol Kaye and the whole > tune basically has legs because of that riff. Now "Needles and Pins" > is not by him!?!?!?!? Well, I don't think anyone has disputed Sonny's authorship of "I Got You Babe", "You Better Sit Down Kids", "A Cowboys Work Is Never Done", "Our Last Show" and other memorable songs. I wrote: > My source: The Encycopedia of Record Producers: > "[Jackie De Shannon] and Nitzsche... wrote many songs together, > including the hit single 'Needles and Pins', recorded by the Searchers > in 1964 and Tom Petty and Stevie Nicks in 1986. Although co-writing > credit is attributed to Sonny Bono, Nitzsche explains that 'Sonny was > having a rough time then. He was going through his first divorce.' Phil Milstein; > That might be sufficient to explain how Sonny got his name on there, > but leaves the question of why Jackie got her's axed off, as well as > why she's (as far as I know) never uttered a peep about it over all > these years, hanging wide open. Yes, it DOES leave the question open of why it was Jackie whose name was taken off of "Needles and Pins". If anyone was going to be a martyr for Sonny, I would've thought it would've been Jack Nitzsche, who owed his entry into the music business to Sonny. Or why couldn't they have just done a three-way split? As to why Jackie has never said anything, it's just a code of honor that seems to be prevalent among songwriters. It's similar to the way that some songwriting teams, such as Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway, often wrote songs individually, but shared credit on everything anyway, and other teams who have always kept mum about who wrote words or music or certain parts on any particular song. Me again: > Another excellent version of "Needles and Pins", which received a rave > review in Billboard, was the one recorded by British group Smokie... Andres: > I would add that the Smokie's version once was a really smashing > (though latent) hit in the USSR (the country being hidden behind the > iron curtain at that time). By some mistake or confusion the video of > this song was shown on soviet TV on some New Year's program. I think > Chris Norman would be really delighted to know what a cult hero status > he had among Soviet gals and boys way back 1978... Cool! Thanks for that interesting info, Andres! I'm a big Smokie fan, but I never knew that they had scored a hit in the USSR. Glenn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 10:55:40 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: L.A. Smoke Pjil (sic) Milstein: > A friend of mine asked me: Know anything about an L.A. pop-spych band > (1968 or s) called Smoke? I'm trying to get hold of their CD but it > seems to be unavailable. Here you go Pjil ;)...from Allmusic.com... The Smoke was a one-off studio group created by producer/musician Michael Lloyd. Lloyd was previously in an early lineup of the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, and is featured on the group's very first two-track recordings, Vol. 1 (he left before they signed to Reprise). Lloyd remained busy with various music projects, and would soon be producing October Country for Epic. A few years earlier, he'd crossed paths with producer Kim Fowley, who signed Lloyd to a publishing deal when the songwriter was only 13. Fowley later introduced Lloyd to entertainment mogul Mike Curb, who was producing "teensploitation" movies at the time. Curb heard examples of Lloyd's musical gifts and decided to give him the opportunity to produce a handful of groups for his Tower imprint and its Sidewalk subsidiary, including one of Lloyd's own groups, the Laughing Wind. This group featured Stan Ayeroff on guitar and Steve Baim on drums, and had issued a Fowley-produced single in 1966 when Lloyd was only 15. Ayeroff and Aims had played with a few other bands as well, including Max Frost & the Troopers. Curb gave Lloyd free reign of his Hollywood Boulevard Studios for six months. It was during this time that Lloyd, Ayeroff, and Aims recorded an entire album's worth of folky, psychedelic canyon music under the name the Smoke. Lloyd sang lead vocals and played bass and keyboards, while Ayeroff (who co-wrote three of the songs) played guitar and Baim played the drums and percussion. Toward the end of the project, a childhood friend of Lloyd's, Jimmy Greenspoon (they had both been members of the New Dimensions, a surf combo, as well as the British Invasion-inspired Alley Kats and the Rogues), became interested in joining his friend's band. Greenspoon even posed for the album cover photographs, but he never joined (instead, he formed his own group, Three Dog Night). Curb released the Smoke's album on his Sidewalk label, a division of his Hollywood- based Sidewalk Productions company in 1967 (and a subsidiary of the Tower label; this was prior to Curb selling it to the Transcontinental Entertainment Corporation). Despite encouragement from Tower and a wide release, the album didn't perform as expected. After recording The Smoke album (and briefly traveling on the road with the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band), Ayeroff ventured off to college, and later returned to music. In 1971, he was a founding member of Oingo Boingo, a surrealistic musical theater group who later developed into a rock band. He wrote numerous music books and toured as a guitarist and arranger. Baim continued to write music and poetry, before becoming an architect and builder in Los Angeles. By the fall of 1969, Curb became president of MGM Records and Lloyd (then 20 years old) was named the company's vice president of A&R. Before then, he had continued working with Ayeroff and Baim as the Rubber Band (who, like the Smoke, didn't perform or travel). They released four "songbook" albums filled with cover versions of tunes by Hendrix, the Beatles, and others. Michael Lloyd continued to work in the music industry, becoming one of the most successful American record producers ever. His recordings have earned over 100 gold and platinum awards, several Grammys, Academy Awards, Dove Awards, Golden Globes, and American Music Awards. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 10:31:50 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked Mark Frumento on "Let It Be...Naked": > Knowing the price of bootlegs, the $12.00 price I paid seems like a > bargain. Eddy: > I agree, but in Europe it's a full-price CD at 22.50 Euro (about $25). Well I was naughty I got mine at Asda/Walmart for 9.77 on the day of release, I think it should retail at 12.99. But I am sure the noticeable differences between the original vinyl & this version have made it worthwhile, "Across The Universe", "Let It Be" & "Long & Winding Road" in particular. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 16:19:47 -0000 From: S'pop Projects Subject: New @ musica: Kim Carnes / The Guilloteens New @ musica: Kim Carnes "From The Inside" (original demo) Inspirational Artie Wayne song. (See Message #15018 from Artie Wayne) The Guilloteens "I Don't Believe" (HBR 446, 1965) The Righteous Brothers meet the MFQ. One listen and it becomes easier to envisage the unissued Phil Spector-produced version. (See Message #14974 from Amber) Click here to listen to both tracks: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Enjoy, The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 17:02:27 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: The Off Set Bob Rashkow: > Group from Greece (I think) called the Off-Set was signed to Jubilee > in '66. Their B-side "Xanthia (Lisa)" if I'm interpreting the lyrics > correctly is being sung by one guy to another (unless it's just my > own fantasy :--((!!!) and toward the end of this otherwise > delightfully psychedelic piece, says to him, "I asked if it be worth > the pain that I might endure/After I heard his reply I began to > realize our love was gone for sure." This could easily be interpreted > in several different ways; he could be singing to "Lisa" about an > encounter he had with her boyfriend. Hi Bob, I'm not sure of the meaning of "Xanthia"'s lyrics, but The Off Set was an American group -- from Brooklyn -- that used to be known as the Jagged Edge. They'd previously released "You Can't Keep A Good Man Down" on Gallant Records. I really like their jangly cover of "A Change Is Gonna Come". Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 12:04:30 -0500 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Who are THESE Warlocks? "Need somebody to help me y'all". Does anyone here have "Hey Jo"/"Girl" by the Warlocks on Wash. Square? I need to know the credits on this one. And... does anyone know if this is REALLY a Michigan band, or just a band on a Michigan label? Thanks, Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 12:32:59 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time) From: Paul Balser Subject: Re: Need help with song title/artist Justin McDevitt: > To my question: A few nights ago, I was listening to the oldies > channel included in the specific satellite package that I subscribe > to. Just after listening to a great recording of Bobby Freeman's > Betty Lou's Got A New Pair Of Shoes, a song was played that I really > enjoyed; (a real rocker). In all the years I've been listening to > rock 'n roll, I've never heard this track. Based on the lyrics, I > believe that the song is title Sugaree, Sugaree; not to be confused > with Sugaree; a track from Jerry Garcia's 1971 first sole Lp. The > artist on this track sounded like Ronnie Hawkins. Any assistance > would be appreciated. The song "Sugaree" was recorded by a man named Rusty York. I believe the year was 1959. Rusty operates Jewel Records in Cincinnati Ohio. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 08:31:48 -0800 (PST) From: Bill Brown Subject: Re: Bob Seger Clark Besch wrote: > When all that fantastic Cameo/Parkway stuff of his sits > unreleased, the piece of crap ("Old Time") continues to be > praised on oldies radio. I cannot believe that "Feel Like A Number" is not included in Bob Seger's recent greatest hits collection either, but who knows what these people are thinking when they put these collections together? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 16:16:28 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Disco Rocks Clark Besch: > Don't know what the last rock n roll record was, but when > oldies channels started playing Bob Seger's "Old Time Rock > 'n' Roll" as an oldie, it started the fast decline of oldies > radio. When all that fantastic Cameo/Parkway stuff of his > sits unreleased, the piece of crap continues to be praised > on oldies radio. It helped start the "oh that old song is > in a movie, let's play it!" campaign and issued in the > deletion of 50's oldies like the song was saying "OK, I am > saying everything about those records in one song, so why play > all of them?" What I remember about this song was, it was meant as a slam against disco music. There's a line in the song where Bob declares he'd never go to a discotheque, which I always thought was ignorant. Discotheques got their start in the '60s during rock's Golden Age . . . and besides, wasn't rock thought of as dance music in the beginning? I distinctly recall a party at my college dorm in Boston where all the hard rock enthusiasts would start singing "Old Time Rock 'n' Roll" at the top of their lungs whenever the DJ put on a dance/disco record . . . this must've been around 1980. I liked disco (still do), and I loved '50s and '60s rock (still do), so since then I've harbored a sour attitude about that song. I'd much rather remember Bob Seger for "Heavy Music," his absolutely awesome Cameo-Parkway single (ironically, it's a killer of a dance record . . . guess ol' Bob got away from his roots). Speaking of disco music, I wonder if I'm the only one on this list who feels that Holland-Dozier-Holland deserve credit for inventing the American version of that genre (with a nod to Bob Crewe for early inspiration)? You can practically trace the evolution of what would become disco music through their productions for The Supremes, The Four Tops, The Isley Brothers, Kim Weston and The Vandellas. Their Invictus/Hot Wax catalog is chock-full of prototype disco records like "Since The Days Of Pigtails," "Band Of Gold," "Cherish What Is Dear To You", "Somebody's Been Sleeping In My Bed" and "One Monkey Don't Stop No Show." I dare anyone to say that they hate disco after listening to Freda Payne's first two albums! Freda, her sister Scherrie and Edna Wright wrote the book on how to sing a disco song right (check out Edna's devastating vocal on "Sunday Morning People"). The cut "Take My Love" from Honey Cone's TAKE ME WITH YOU album is the earliest example I can find of true, pure disco music. It appeared in 1969! Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 06:48:35 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: The Beatles in the charts Andres wrote: > "Songs which ousted the Beatles from No 1 spot or > didn't permit the Beatles to get to the top in the charts". > Hi, this is a compilation I'm working at now. I need > your help! What were the singles at the top when the > following Beatles songs couldn't make it and only stayed at > No 2 in the UK? > Please Please Me - Jan 1963 21 and 28 Feb '63 - The Wayward Wind by Frank Ifield. No 1, PPM No 2. PPM then dropped down. (Frank was very big in '62 and '63!) > Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever - Feb 1967 > (Release Me by Humperdink?) Yes - Release Me, weeks ending 2 ,9 and 15 March - and it was still there when PL/SFF dropped down. Release Me was a freak hit (I mean - it's so dreary!). But George H said that they were relieved when PL didn't get to No 1! > Magical Mystery Tour EP - Dec 1967 (Hello Goodbye?) Yes - it's a famous question - who kept MMT off the No 1 spot? Answer - the Beatles. > Let It Be - Mar 1970 On 14 March Let It Be entered at No 2 - No 1 was Wandrin' Star by Lee Marvin - another freak hit! The very next week Let It Be dropped down to No 3. Strange. > Free As A Bird - Dec 1995 Earth Song by Michael Jackson pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 09:46:40 -0500 From: Rat Pfink Subject: Re: Need help with song title/artist Justin McDevitt wrote: > To my question: A few nights ago, I was listening to the oldies > channel included in the specific satellite package that I subscribe > to. Just after listening to a great recording of Bobby Freeman's > Betty Lou's Got A New Pair Of Shoes, a song was played that I really > enjoyed; (a real rocker). In all the years I've been listening to > rock 'n roll, I've never heard this track. Based on the lyrics, I > believe that the song is title Sugaree, Sugaree; not to be confused > with Sugaree; a track from Jerry Garcia's 1971 first sole Lp. The > artist on this track sounded like Ronnie Hawkins. Any assistance > would be appreciated. Maybe "Sugaree" (written by Marty Robbins) by either Rusty York or Hank Ballard & the Midnighters. Here's a link to the lyrics: http://www.rockabilly.nl/lyrics4/s0120.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 17:47:00 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Re: Beatles No 2s > "Songs which ousted the Beatles from No 1 spot or didn't > permit the Beatles to get to the top in the charts". > Hi, this is a compilation I'm working at now. I need your > help! What were the singles at the top when the following > Beatles songs couldn't make it and only stayed at No 2 in > the UK? Please Please Me - Jan 1963 No1 was The Wayward Wind by Frank Ifield Penny Lane/Strawberry Fields Forever - Feb 1967 (Release Me by Humperdink?) Yes, it was Release Me (AGHHHHH shocking!) Magical Mystery Tour EP - Dec 1967 (Hello Goodbye?) Correct again, Hello Goodbye Let It Be - Mar 1970 Wand'rin Star by Lee Marvin Free As A Bird - Dec 1995 I have no idea! Sorry; probably some sad Boy Band! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 09:29:25 -0500 From: Rat Pfink Subject: Re: L.A. Smoke Phil Milstein wrote: > A friend of mine asked me: "Know anything about an L.A. pop- > psych band (1968 or s) called Smoke? I'm trying to get hold > of their CD but it seems to be unavailable." > I told her I didn't, but that I'd pose it to you-all. The Smoke was one of producer Michael Lloyd's studio creations. The album hasn't gotten a legit CD release yet but bootleg versions are floating around. Check out this link from the Shindig! Magazine web site for more info on The Smoke: http://www.shindig-magazine.com/reviews-aug2003-3.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 13:42:15 -0000 From: Chris King Subject: DA DOO RON RON Xmas Shindig Sat 20th December, Brighton Dear Brit-based Spectropoppers - The 5th Da Doo Ron Ron - the one & only 6ts girl group club - Xmas shindig takes place on Saturday 20th December (the Saturday before Xmas) @ the Sussex Arts Club, 07 , Ship Street, Brighton, BN1. Tel:-01273-778020 / 727371. The night features a much anticipated appearance by Emma Wilkinson, the series winner of Stars In Their Eyes 2001. Emma won a landslide victory in the 2001 SITE grand final performing 'Son Of A Preacher Man' as Dusty Springfield. Emma will perform a selection of 60s pop and soul classics with happenin' mod jazz instrumental combo The Gene Drayton Unit. The brilliant GDU (think Booker T meets Blue Note) will also present a solo set. Of course, regular DJs Chris 'Da Doo' King & Si Bridger spin their familiar mix of 60s girly sounds a-go-go from the likes of The Ronettes, Dusty, Supremes, Marvelettes, Lesley Gore, Barbara Lewis, Chris Clark, Shangri-Las, Petula, Lulu, Helen Shapiro, Vandellas, Brenda Holloway, Shirley Bassey & so on. You'll NEVER hear a MALE lead vocal @ DDRR! Please note that doors swing open @ the earlier time of 8pm. Admission for this very special Da Doo is 8. You can purchase tickets in advance online now from http://www.wegottickets.com/gig.asp?2279 Tickets are also currently available in person from the Sussex Arts Club. Find out more at the Sussex Arts Club web-site http://www.sussexarts.com/content.asp?pid=listings Alternatively, you can simply reserve places in the normal way & pay 8 on the door on the night. E-mail the names of all those wishing to attend to:- dadooronron.club@ntlworld.com PLEASE NOTE:-that you must purchase tickets or reserve places in advance to gain entry! Check out the DDRR web-site for more info:- http://homepage.ntlworld.com/dadooronron/ Many thanks for your indulgence, Chris Da Doo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 12:11:50 -0000 From: Gary Subject: Re: Gary Usher and Dick Campbell Clark Besch wrote: > I really enjoyed the Gary Usher/Dick Campbell clip on musica. Good > stuff! Thanks for sharing it with us! Actually I dont believe the song in musica was related to Gary Usher. It was a take off of a song written by a friend of Dick's called "Backroads" that Dick modified for this Honda commercial. I posted it because I saw someone request that people post 60s commercials in musica. Dick won an international broadcasting award from the Hollywood Radio and Television Society - the award honoring the world's best broadcast advertisement of 1972. Here is the song (Honda Way) that won Dick the award: TITLE:--------(Honda Way). PRODUCT:------(Motorcycles). ADVERTISERS:--(American Honda Motor Co. Inc.). AGENCY:-------(Grey advertising Inc.). PRODUCTION:---(Quantum Records). CATEGORY:-----(Radio Musical 60 seconds). TALENT:-------(Dick Campbell). -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 04:00:48 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Modern Doo Wop Superoldies wrote: > In terms of oldies artists producing good, yet new > music, The Capris' "Morse Code Of Love" is a modern doo-wop > classic that was recorded in the '80s Aha! What other modern doo wop records are there? (What's modern? I suppose anything from the last 20 years...) pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2003 11:43:53 -0000 From: JJ Subject: Fading Yellow Vols 6 & 7 - Feedback!! Any views on these 2 latest volumes? As the person responsible for the track listing, I'm curious to get some feedback! Thanx! JJ/Sweden -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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