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Spectropop - Digest Number 1122



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Jackie and (especially) Gayle
           From: sd45john 
      2. Praise The Lord! Scott Walker Box Coming
           From: David Ponak 
      3. Re: Jackie and (especially) Gayle
           From: sd45john 
      4. Superoldies
           From: Orion 
      5. 13th Power / Missing Lynx Dynovoice Mystery?
           From: Leonardo 
      6. Re: Gay recordings / Phil S. on the air / Lost & Found
           From: Phil Milstein 
      7. Re: Superoldies
           From: Gary 
      8. Re: (The House Of) The Four Minute Single
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      9. Righteous Brothers on Haven
           From: Peter Richmond 
     10. Re: Gay recordings / Teddy and Darrell LP on Mira
           From: Mike McKay 
     11. Re: Let It Be...Naked
           From: Eddy 
     12. Re: What Was The LAST Rock & Roll Record?
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     13. Re: To That Alan Gordon
           From: Glenn 
     14. Re: What Was The First Rock & Roll Record?
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     15. Re: Needles And Pins
           From: Andres 
     16. Let It Be......Naked
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     17. Re: Let It Be...Naked
           From: Mark Frumento 
     18. Re: Butchers / Short Albums
           From: Mike McKay 
     19. Re: "Let It Be ... Naked"
           From: D P Wirth 
     20. Hebb's Sunny
           From: Phil Milstein 
     21. Stars of Defense
           From: Patrick Rands 
     22. Re: Gay, Lesbian & Cross Gender GG songs
           From: Mike McKay 
     23. Re: What Was The LAST Rock & Roll Record?
           From: Bill Brown 
     24. Four Minute Single/Dylan Goes Electric
           From: Frank Uhle 
     25. Re: Gay recordings / Teddy and Darrell LP on Mira
           From: Art Longmire 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 3:52am From: sd45john Subject: Re: Jackie and (especially) Gayle Okay, I got thrown off track! The "Gayle" that sings 'Home Of The Brave' on epsiode 57 of Shindig is actually a singer called "Linda Gayle". No connection with Jackie and Gayle! Though she is kind of cute. SD45John -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 1:06am From: David Ponak Subject: Praise The Lord! Scott Walker Box Coming On November 24, "Scott Walker in 5 Easy Pieces: A Themed CD Anthology" will come out in the UK. Yay! Cover art and track listing can be found here: http://www.spincds.com/walker.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 2:49am From: sd45john Subject: Re: Jackie and (especially) Gayle I saw that Shindig show with "Gayle" singing 'Home Of The Brave'. She sure looks like Gayle of Jackie and Gayle. The only problem is: Gayle is a blonde! So Jackie must be the brunette. When I first saw that clip, I thought maybe the two broke up and they each went solo. By the way, on the subject of Shindig: Does anyone know whatever became of one of the Shindig dancers by the name of Carole Shelyne? (The kooky blonde with the glasses). She was my favorite Shindig dancer. She appeared in the teen movie Out Of Sight (1966) and also in one of the episodes of The Man From Uncle. SD45John -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 3:23am From: Orion Subject: Superoldies Superoldies wrote: > Greetings everyone - just a quick note to let everyone here know that > I have a 24/7 free, live oldies station at http://www.superoldies.com > All-Request shows on Tuesday 2-4 CST, currently 8900 tunes from 2500 > artists & growing. Listen in while you're surfing the net! You play any Bubblegum or Sunshine Pop? Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:48am From: Leonardo Subject: 13th Power / Missing Lynx Dynovoice Mystery? Hello all, I am inquiring if anybody knows if the 13th Power Captain Hassle "I See A Change Going To Come" was ever released on Dynovoice as record # 227? I've found The Missing Lynx record with the same catalog number and recently I've Found the 13th Power 45 on a different label but with the same catalog number. The discography I have was from Ted Neely. It lists the 13th Power as a Dynovoice release. I believe this might have been a typo. But I just want to make sure that it really is so I'm not chasing ghosts! All help appreciated!!! Cheers Leonardo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 2:18am From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Gay recordings / Phil S. on the air / Lost & Found Art Longmire wrote: > While we're on the subject of gay recordings, I wanted to ask if > anyone else has heard the Teddy & Darrell LP on Mira? It dates > from 1966 and features an openly gay duo taking on a bunch of the > hits of the day. When it comes to gay cover versions, this one's > a classic of sorts. I've got a bootleg CD entitled "Queer To The Core!" (Quick Nuts 02-69), which anthologizes the entire Teddy & Darrell LP (which is put-on, if you ask me), and tosses in three 45s, including "I'd Rather Fight Than Swish" b/w "I'd Rather Swish Than Fight" by a B. Bubba, from the Camp label, as well as (and here I will quote from a review I wrote of the CD), "another whole album, a spoken-word affair entitled 'Call Me Misster,' wherein a bevy of black drag queens engage in a coffee klatch about the ins and outs of being gay in the early '60s. The conversation gets quite animated, very candid, and is far funnier than any of the so-called funny music on 'Queer To The Core!'" J.D. (or anyone else, for that matter), you're welcome to contact me offlist if you want more info on this collection. By the way, I enjoyed the thorough documentation on your site of the Camp label. Have you ever gotten to the (and please excuse the pun) bottom of who was (again) behind Camp? John Fox wrote: > This was a very small part of the KHJ Los Angeles "History of Rock and > Roll", a 48-hour radio documentary produced in the early 1970s. In > this section, Phil did a "blindfold" test (the old Downbeat Magazine > routine), where they played him s few songs to comment on. I do > remember that two others besides "Reach Out" were "Since I Don't Have > You" (where he marveled at the soprano voice at the end) and Phil's own > "Zip-a-dee-do-dah" (whose castanets he said were influenced by the > Harlem Globetrotters "Sweet Georgia Brown" theme) This appearance sounds fascinating. If anyone's in a position to get me some sort of dub of it, I'll be happy to try to work out some sort of swap. James Botticelli wrote: > I was the originator of Lost & Found at WMBR and we did precisely what > Stewart describes. The bickering was between people who leaned in a > spectropoppish direction like me or the endless stream of deadheads > who wanted shows that played 15 minute live album cuts, etc. Phil > Milstein was part that show's staff for a while as well. We agree that > the show has gotten a bit too dead-ish but then again I haven't > listened for awhile. One of the guys does a "bubbling under the hot- > 100" segment that's pretty interesting. Agreed. In fact it was this stoner-music contingent that proved to be the undoing of my Lost & Found slot -- I think they were offended by the fact that I sometimes played music by actual black people, as well as stuff recorded prior to 1966. (Jimmy B. leaned even more heavily in those directions than I did, but, as the show's founder, he had seniority.) The good Lost & Found DJs were amazing; the bad ones unlistenable. I too haven't tuned it in in years, but I have a feeling this dichotomy still exists. The show probably should've been broken off into two separate ones a long time ago. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 1:05pm From: Gary Subject: Re: Superoldies Superoldies wrote: > Greetings everyone - just a quick note to let everyone here know that > I have a 24/7 free, live oldies station at http://www.superoldies.com > All-Request shows on Tuesday 2-4 CST, currently 8900 tunes from 2500 . artists & growing. Listen in while you're surfing the net! I can certainly vouch for Shawn and his SuperOldies internet radio station. He plays ANYTHING that hit the Top 100 on the Billboard and Cashbox charts from 1955 to Dec. 1969, including rarities and regional hits. TRY IT, YOU'LL LIKE IT! Gary -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed Nov 19, 2003 9:07pm From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: (The House Of) The Four Minute Single Re "House Of The Rising Sun": Does anyone other than this old man remember the Miriam Makeba version? Quite good. di da, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 10:52am From: Peter Richmond Subject: Righteous Brothers on Haven Glenn wrote: > While I'd hate to disagree with an obvious Righteous Brothers expert, > I myself am somewhat of an expert on Haven Records and their owners, > songwriters/producers Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter. And I may not > even be technically "disagreeing", depending on terminology. > > But when I read the phrase "released as a single", my assumption is > that you are referring to the A-side of the single. While the > Righteous Brothers' version of "Substitute" (which indeed was the > original version -- Willie Harry Wilson was a staff writer and artist > for Haven) was released ON Haven 7014, it was NOT the A-side of the > single. The A-side was a cover of the Coasters' "Young Blood", which > I actually heard played for a couple of weeks on a radio station in > D.C. So "Substitute" was the flip side, which is not the same as > being "released as a single". According to Haven Records at the time, Haven 7014 "Substitute"/"Young Blood" was released as a double A side. Have you any details of any further unreleased Righteous Brothers tracks from their Haven days, I know of four that surfaced in the early 90's, the Lambert/Potter produced "Hey Girl" (Goffin/King) and "If That's The Way You Want It" (Lambert/Potter) plus the two Bill Medley/Art Munson produced "Father Of The Rock N Roll" (Medley) and "Happy Song" (Medley). Peter Righteous Brothers Discography: http://freespace.virgin.net/p.richmond/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 9:32am From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Gay recordings / Teddy and Darrell LP on Mira Art Longmire wrote: > While we're on the subject of gay recordings, I wanted to ask if > anyone else has heard the Teddy & Darrell LP on Mira? It dates > from 1966 and features an openly gay duo taking on a bunch of the > hits of the day. When it comes to gay cover versions, this one's > a classic of sorts. If you're referring to "These Are the Hits, You Silly Savage!" -- yep, I've got it. Of all my many plunderings of the cut-out bins in the early 70s, this has to rank as my most unusual find (along with, perhaps, that SINA album!). I don't believe I've ever listened to it. It could still be sealed, in fact...I'll have to check. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:36am From: Eddy Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked David Coyle: > Could this be ushering in the near-future possibility of seeing the > "Let It Be" movie given full release, preferably on DVD with > outtakes and other goodies? Why give us 20 minutes of audio and 20- > some pages of transcripts of events that mostly took place on sound > movie film, and keep the actual movie itself in the can? Word is that they're working on a re-edited version of the movie. Apparently Sir Paul has this bug in his ear that a "happier" version of the film is called for. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 9:25am From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: What Was The LAST Rock & Roll Record? > Okay, okay, okay, but what was the LAST rock &roll record? Answer me > that. Great question. I'm sure there wil be many answers from those who know far more than I. I'll offer this possibility -- the first rock and roll record and the last rock and roll record were the same record -- and that record was Hail Hail Rock and Roll. Di da, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:04am From: Glenn Subject: Re: To That Alan Gordon Alan, Thanks so much for responding so quickly to my post! And so kindly. Wow, since I loved Sha Na Na's version of "Maybe I'm Old Fashioned" so much, I'm sure I'd also love your own version of it, especially if you yourself think it's better. When I said the song was "one of the greatest songs ever written by anyone anywhere anytime", the key words are "song" and "written" - it is the song itself, its free- wheeling structure, whimsy, originality, irony, sentimentality and passion, that impresses me most. So it would be very exciting to me to hear how you originally envisoned (and recorded) it. So I will DEFINITELY seek out your own version as Alias Billy Hills. I never knew that you had your own label. What was it called? I'd love to learn more about it. You're very welcome for the things I said. They are indeed heartfelt, and I'm glad that came across to you. They are just some of the things I've been wanting to say to you, and Garry, for a very long time. I was just thrilled to have the opportunity to express them to you here. As much as your songs have touched me, to know that I've touched your life in any way is a tremendous reward for me. Sincerely, Glenn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 9:45am From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: What Was The First Rock & Roll Record? Richard Havers: > Mike, I dare (respond)! It proves nothing, least of all that people are > imbeciles! Why does there have to be agreement anyway? It's a lot like > genealogy, your never quite sure if there are any illegitimate siblings. First, I will admit to being given to hyperbole. Second, I believe you took my statement too seriously. It's not an argument, it's an exploration. I will state that, in my opinion, anyone who seriously offers Percy Faith, Rosemary Clooney and or Glenn Miller, while maybe not being a true imbecile, certainly should be given both a drug and an IQ test. As for there having to be agreement--there doesn't, but it does demonstrate the futility of this persuit pretty well. As I said previously, I found it astonishing that there was not a more defined concentration on a smaller group of possibles. Richard Havers again: > Anyway your list is clearly nonsense as it doesn't mention Wynonie Harris, > Louis Jordan.......and bizarrely Rocket 88 : ) "Nonsense"? Though less agressive and insulting than "imbeciles", essentially illuminates the same conclusion. I think if you check the archives, those people were mentioned in text--but no one specified a particular record. Of course you recognize that it is not "my list"--it was the "group's" list. I just compiled it. At the time, I felt that it would not be productive to post it and it appears that my first judgment was correct. I will have nothing more to offer on the subject, I'm listenting to Alison Krauss and Patty Loveless--talk about some pure girl voices and great harmonies. By the way, there is complete agreement within the bluegrass music community that the first bluegrass record was any of Bill Monroe's early work. I double dare you to dispute that. ;-) Di da, Rashkovsky PS: My next nom de plume is going to be Mike Idare--great name, what? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 0:48pm From: Andres Subject: Re: Needles And Pins Glenn wrote: > Another excellent version of "Needles and Pins", which received a > rave review in Billboard, was the one recorded by British group > Smokie in 1977. It did chart in the U.S., but was only a minor hit > here. However, it was a huge hit in the U.K. and throughout Europe. > Smokie's energetic and unique version, with "piercing" strident > electric rhythm guitars, their trademark high harmonies and the > growly lead vocals of Chris Norman ("Stumblin' In"), was produced by > Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn, and is definitely worth checking out. I would add that the Smokie's version once was a really smashing (though latent) hit in the USSR (the country being hidden behind the iron curtain at that time). By some mistake or confusion the video of this song was shown on soviet TV on some New Year's program. I think Chris Norman would be really delighted to know what a cult hero status he had among Soviet gals and boys way back 1978... A. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 2:37pm From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Let It Be......Naked Does anyone other than me interpret the release of the "Let It Be.... Naked" CD as Paul McCartney's personal slap at Phil Spector? Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
14965 Message: 17 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 4:59pm From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Let It Be...Naked David Coyle wrote: > I'm surprised that I haven't seen more discussion of the newly released > Beatles album "Let It Be...Naked. Got the CD too and I like it. I assume that Beatles experts and the more technical minded will dislike or even hate the thing in a big way. I've already read posts on other message boards that paint the release as everything from a rip-off to heresy. Personally I don't really take it seriously enough to make such judgements. Knowing the price of bootlegs, the $12.00 price I paid seems like a bargain. I agree with you... "Across the Universe" is a bit of a revalation. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 10:08am From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Butchers / Short Albums Michael wrote: > ....Or their local radio station was one of the many across the > country that sought the British Beatle albums so that they could > play some of those tracks not yet available in America (WABC in New > York, for example, was playing "Drive My Car" in December 1965, six > whole months before Capitol Records finally issued it in America. > The crafty station simply had gotten a hold of an English copy of > Rubber Soul, which had that and three other songs not on the American > pressing.) Right! I have an aircheck of WKYC in Cleveland on which all four tracks from the UK Rubber Soul left off of the US version are played. They had done the same thing earlier with "I've Just Seen a Face" and "It's Only Love" from the UK "Help!" album. Imagine a radio station going to those lengths today! Re another poster's complaint about the Philly Oldies station running Motown into the ground with Motown Monday, etc.: that, of course, is a nationwide phenomenon, given that most stations in the country are owned by Clear Channel and one or two other chains. By the same token, every single one of them now does "The 60s at 6:00" and "The 70s at 7:00." It's disgusting, but it's also entirely reflective of mass taste...unlike us, most oldies listeners WANT to hear the same old shit over and over and over again. > But in those days, a Hollies fan in the States was most likely not > aware that his group had a whole album's worth of selections that > seemingly dreaded transatlantic travel. Yes, their second LP "In the Hollies Style," and a wonderful album it is, too...better overall then their next couple. I found out about it in the early 70s and somehow acquired an import copy, and was mightily pleased a few years ago when the Brits issued a CD with both the mono and stereo versions. I enjoyed Michael's article very much; however, the one crucial UK/US album translation he didn't mention is the one in which the US version emerged the winner by several miles: Traffic's debut album, variously known as "Heaven Is in Your Mind" and "Mr. Fantasy." The UK version, artist's intent or no, pales next to the US one that benefits from the addition of "Paper Sun" (and the elimination of "Utterly Simple" and other duff tracks). Yet with the advent of the CD, the UK version was all that was to be had. For years I haunted the used shops, buying multiple copies of the US LP in hopes that one would be in better shape than my own battered original. Finally the situation was rectified a few years back with the CD release of the US version of the album under its original title. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 0:20pm From: D P Wirth Subject: Re: "Let It Be ... Naked" If EMI would have polished the Spector-version too, a fair comparism could be made. Even if you take the original 70's vinyl, you can't compare the sound-quality, as all the tape-hiss was digitalized out which wasn't possible in the old days. And the "old" CD sounds like nearly all of these kind of CD's: just manufactured to fill the company's cash-register and the demand. Made to be only as good to be done better a little later. But soundwise I stand to the spectorished Let it be. DPWirth -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:49am From: Phil Milstein Subject: Hebb's Sunny A friend of mine plays piano in a jazz combo with Thomas Hebb, a terrific bassist whose uncle is Bobby Hebb. I hadn't known about this until meeting Thomas, but apparently Bobby Hebb lives in the Boston area, and the two see each other occasionally. I recently came across a wild rendition of "Sunny" on a Dutch girl group sampler, which gave me the idea of putting together a comp, to ask Thomas to present to his uncle, of versions of the song that he might not already know about. Anyone sitting on such a version who wishes to have it included in the set, please contact me off-list to arrange to get a copy of it to me. --Phil M. P.S. On the other side of his family Thomas is also the nephew of Fontella Bass, but we'll save versions of "Rescue Me" for another time. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 5:33pm From: Patrick Rands Subject: Stars of Defense Does anyone know anything about the Stars of Defense lps? I just recently discovered that Lesley Gore recorded some songs with big band backing for this series (and otherwise unavailable anywhere), and found this Joanie Sommers webpage: http://www.geocities.co.jp/MusicHall/1205/sommers8.htm This website has some helpful information on the series: http://www.conelrad.com/media/atomicmusic/platter_01.html I saw a message in another yahoogroup referring to this series saying "they were usually well recorded and might have some value this way. And, since they were pressed by the hundreds and often went unplayed by local stations, there's lots of copies around in perfect condition." and here's a link with what I gather is an entire program from 1961 - it's pretty nice jazz big band style: http://www.maskmusic.com/other_music.html Does anyone have any of these or know the story behind them? I would love to know how many of these shows in fact exist as well as who else may have done them (any spectropop material besides Lesley and Joanie?). :Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 1:27pm From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Gay, Lesbian & Cross Gender GG songs If I'm allowed to take "GG" out of the header, here are two from Donovan, both sung in the first person: "The Ballad of Geraldine" ("I was born with the name Geraldine") from the early "What's Been Did..." era. "Widow with Shawl: a Portrait" ("Seven years and seven days/No man has seen my woman ways") from "A Gift from a Flower to a Garden". -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 4:03pm From: Bill Brown Subject: Re: What Was The LAST Rock & Roll Record? pb: > Okay, okay, okay, but what was the LAST rock & roll record? Answer me > that. The last rock and roll record was probably "Bang and Blame" by REM. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:15pm From: Frank Uhle Subject: Four Minute Single/Dylan Goes Electric Paul Bryant wrote: > Then, in June, shazam! House of the Rising Sun - also a song > from Dylan's first album - this time he was definitely (the > Animals') source. A nd this gets his attention too. But still > it takes Dylan another 6 months to strap on that Stratocaster > and rewrite "Too Much Monkey Business." Hate to blow another theory here, but have you ever heard the Dylan B-side "Mixed Up Confusion"? It's the flipside of the "Corrina, Corrina" 45 (apparently his first single release), and came out (according to the "Spectropop Research Tool for Record Masters") in 1962. It's an uptempo rock original, featuring most of the elements of his later "folk-rock" sound. The single is ultra rare, and the cut was not compiled on an LP until circa the late '70s (in Japan only), though I believe it is on a U.S. compilation now. As he was apparently fond of 50s rockers like Little Richard (and didn't he once play piano with Bobby Vee up in Hibbing?), I think the rock idea was in his head long before he heard the Beatles or Animals, though some might claim the song was a one-off studio joke. Frank Uhle -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:53pm From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Gay recordings / Teddy and Darrell LP on Mira Art Longmire: > While we're on the subject of gay recordings, I wanted to ask if > anyone else has heard the Teddy & Darrell LP on Mira? It dates > from 1966 and features an openly gay duo taking on a bunch of the > hits of the day. When it comes to gay cover versions, this one's > a classic of sorts. Mike McKay: > If you're referring to "These Are the Hits, You Silly Savage!" -- > yep, I've got it. Of all my many plunderings of the cut-out bins > in the early 70s, this has to rank as my most unusual find (along > with, perhaps, that SINA album!) I don't believe I've ever > listened to it. It could still be sealed, in fact...I'll have to > check. You're in for a treat when you do listen...I was surprised when I got a hold of this, it certainly was ahead of its time. I need to check my copy for the track listings; the only number I recall is a camped- up version of "Wild Thing"(a song certainly made to order for an LP like this). One question I have - is this the first gay covers LP? I haven't heard of an earlier one. And whatever happened to these guys? All I can say is - this is a genuinely funny LP, quite satirical and tongue-in-cheek. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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