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Spectropop - Digest Number 1114



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Alley & the Soul Sneekers
           From: Mick Patrick 
      2. Re: Kit Kats
           From: Steve Harvey 
      3. Re: Elvis covers
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. Perfect Buck
           From: Steve Harvey 
      5. Re: The Association - Collectors Choice Reissues
           From: David Goodwin 
      6. Nino and April Rev-Ola CD
           From: Steve Stanley 
      7. Re: Elvis covers
           From: Mojo 
      8. Re: Four Tops and Spector
           From: Ray 
      9. Re:Originals vs Covers
           From: Bill George 
     10. Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah)
           From: Bill George 
     11. Re: Kit Kats in Philly
           From: Nick Archer 
     12. Joe, Phil, and Folk Rock
           From: Bill Craig 
     13. Whatever Happened to Happy
           From: Bill George 
     14. Re: Four Tops and Spector
           From: Martin Jensen 
     15. Re: Red Bird Sound series
           From: Mick Patrick 
     16. Re: Tuning down a "half step"
           From: John Berg 
     17. Re: Whatever Happened to Happy
           From: Patrick Beckers 
     18. Bonner & Gordon songs / Alley & the Soul Sneekers
           From: Mick Patrick 
     19. Radio Radio
           From: James Botticelli 
     20. Re: Four Tops and Spector
           From: Tom Taber 
     21. Re: Alley & the Soul Sneekers / Carl Hall
           From: That Alan Gordon 
     22. Re: Originals vs Covers
           From: James Botticelli 
     23. When You Move It In The Room
           From: Steve Harvey 
     24. Re: Kit Kats in Philly
           From: Steve Harvey 
     25. Tuning down a "half step"
           From: Steve Harvey 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 00:08:47 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Alley & the Soul Sneekers Martin Roberts: > Next week's choice is between two album tracks: Alley and the > Soul Sneekers (AKA That Alan Gordon) with "Understand Your Man" > on Capitol from 1979, or Sumner with "Run Cindy Run" on Asylum > from 1980. Blimey. Disco! My, how a quest for all things Nitzsche-related can broaden one's musical menu. For those who are unaware, the Alley & the Soul Sneekers LP is a source of ten songs written by That Alan Gordon, most of them featuring lead vocals by the one and only Carl Hall. For fans of such things, the track "How Can I Leave Her" is a girl group-style number with the flavour of Darlene Love's "Christmas (Baby, Please Come Home)". Maybe Alan can share with us all some memories of working with one of the most remarkable singers that ever lived. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:25:58 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Kit Kats John and Karl were with Kit when they reformed the Kats in the late 80s. It didn't last too long before Kit and the others had a falling out. However, I got to see them twice; at Jerry Blavat's club and Immaculata College. Great medley of Four Seasons tunes done at that show. Taped both! I think Ronnie is a butcher and wasn't interested in a musica career anymore. Heard that Karl use to play down in Disney World for many years. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:28:32 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Elvis covers Phil M: > Does anyone know if any compilation albums of covers of Elvis songs > exists? There's the double CD Last Temptation of Elvis with Bruce, Nanci Giffith, Vivian Stanshall, Cramps, McCartney and others. Pretty good stuff. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:33:15 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Perfect Buck Steveo: > steve...do you have perfect pitch?...or how are you noticing this > tuning down a 1/2 step? No, I don't know have perfect pitch. It was a pretty standard thing to do (never knew the Beatles had done it). Bill Kirchen mentioned this to me the first time I heard it. Have heard it or read it several times since. However, if you tune your guitar to an electronic tuner you will have to retune it to the record if you're trying to figure out something on Buck's discs. I learned "Buck's Polka" last year. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 19:25:38 -0600 From: David Goodwin Subject: Re: The Association - Collectors Choice Reissues Re the Association Collectors Choice CDs...there've been rumors of a Warners UK set of reissues for quite some time now. Honestly, I'm not too fond of CC's reissuing strategy; basically, they put out a bare- bones version of some title (throwing their logo all over it...and in THIS case they're bandying about a "FIRST TIME ON CD" line, despite the Japanese discs that preceded 'em), which then inevitably gets reissued with extra tracks somewhere a month or so later. See "No Other" for an example of this, and Warners UK has been sitting on expanded reissues of the two Beau Brummels titles for a few months now, allegedly. Bottom line: the CC discs are inexpensive, but you get what you pay for. Hopefully, more comprehensive reissues (including mono single mixes, as in the Japanese discs) are forthcoming. -D -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 18:09:52 -0800 From: Steve Stanley Subject: Nino and April Rev-Ola CD Country Paul wrote: > Never heard it before, Part 1: "Wings of Love," by Nino Tempo & April > Stevens, White Whale WW-248, 1962. WFMU's Monica Lynch played it today, > and it pinned my ears back! Sort of "Wimoweh" meets Phil Spector > recording the Mamas and Papas. Came home to discover I had it on a 45 - > but it didn't sound as full or rich as the version I heard on the air, > apparently from a Rev-ola CD. So, questions: (1) Is it indeed Rev-ola? > (2) Is the CD version a remix? (3) I already have the Varese CD; is > there much more on the Rev-ola that's missing from the Varese? Help, > please! "Wings of Love" b/w "My Old Flame" (WHITE WHALE 246) was released by White Whale in 1968. Did WFMU reference a version from 1962? If they played the Rev-Ola reissue of 'All Strung Out,' then they played this later version (I don't think a 1962 Nino and April recording of "Wings Of Love" exists...) I worked on the Rev-Ola 'All Strung Out' CD and can confirm that the master used was not a clone of the 1996 Varese CD. It was remastered by Joe Foster and Nick Robbins. Unlike the Varese version, the Rev-Ola CD also features the great Nino Tempo solo track "Boys Town" as well as an interview with Nino himself. Steve -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 02:11:07 -0000 From: Mojo Subject: Re: Elvis covers Phil M: > Does anyone know if any compilation albums of covers of Elvis songs > exists? Hello Phil, Elvis Has Left The Building: A Tribute To A King is the cover album of Elvis tracks which I have in my collection. Artists Include Billy Joel, Johnny Cash, Meatloaf, Pet Shop Boys, amongst others. Came out Aug 2002 on the Sony label. So it should still be available. Happy hunting. Mojo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 02:26:34 -0000 From: Ray Subject: Re: Four Tops and Spector Martin Jensen: > When listening to some Four Tops albums today, I began to fantasise > about how great a collaboration between the group and Spector could > have been.... I read somewhere that Phil really liked the Four Tops' sound. When he first signed the Rightous Bros and got toghether with Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil to write a song for them, he wanted it to sound similar to the Four Tops' "Baby I need your Lovin". What they achieved is, of course, music history..."You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling'" ....named one of the best songs of the Century by BMI!! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 21:48:43 EST From: Bill George Subject: Re:Originals vs Covers Someone said: > Likewise (the Beatles') "Money" which surely beats the original. My favorite is the Flaming Lizards 80s version. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 22:02:22 EST From: Bill George Subject: Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah) That Alan Gordon: > Bill George wanted to know who was the artist who had a big hit with > Puccini's "Musetta`s waltz". It was "Don't You Know" by the wonderful > Della Reese. Thank you! Next time I encounter that question I'll be able to correct the game! I was sure it wasn't Dinah. Is this song available anymore? - Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 21:17:26 -0600 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Kit Kats in Philly I lived for several years in Willingboro New Jersey, right outside Philadelphia in the sixties. It was the heyday of WIBG, WFIL had just started as a rock-n-roller. I kept a transistor radio on 24/7, had a one diode radio that I built with a crystal earphone to listen in my bed, and I had a clip that kept my transistor radio centered between the handlebars of my bike. I don't remember which station it was, but one day I was riding around the neighborhood and "Let's Get Lost On a Country Road" came on. I was mesmerized, and stopped my bike to listen until I heard who had done this wonderful record. I never bought the 45, but in my college years picked up a Jamie-Guyden greatest hits LP with the song. It wasn't until 1981 or so that I found the album at a punk music store in Denver Colorado. It's one of my favorite songs of all time, and really brings back the feeling of Philadelphia radio in the 60's. If the stations there are ignoring their heritage, and not playing all the great music made right there, it's a shame. Nick Archer (who still has his Charge! Wibbage button) Check out Nashville's classic radio station SM95 on the web at: http://www.live365.com/stations/nikarcher -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 05:13:05 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Joe, Phil, and Folk Rock With regard to the comparison of Phil Spector to Joe Meek, I think you can use a cinematic analogy. Spector as Cecil B. DeMille to Meek's Ed Wood. Even though both made great groundbreaking hit records (Telstar will always be my favorite instrumental of all time) a part of the charm is the low budget inventiveness. (Toilets flushing backwards etc.) I think the main similarity was their independent maverick status. Folk Rock: I once had some songs that I had submitted to a publisher returned with a rejection letter that not only passed on the material but objected to the fact that I had referred to the songs as "Folk Rock" in my cover letter.His point was that only songs that incorporated a message about some social issue could be labeled Folk Rock. I disagreed then and I still do. And if "Needles And Pins" is where it all started, it makes the case that there is no such criteria. Bill Craig Thanks to David Coyle for the word on "Pretty Flamingo". I've never heard Gene Pitney's version. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 05:45:18 -0000 From: Bill George Subject: Whatever Happened to Happy Now playing in musica: Jackie DeShannon's version of Whatever Happened To Happy. Now if someone can play the Mojo Men... Comparison comments anyone? Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 10:19:46 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Re: Four Tops and Spector Ray wrote: > I read somewhere that Phil really liked the Four Tops' sound. When > he first signed the Rightous Bros and got toghether with Barry Mann > and Cynthia Weil to write a song for them, he wanted it to sound > similar to the Four Tops' "Baby I need your Lovin". What they > achieved is, of course, music history..."You've Lost That Lovin' > Feeling'" ....named one of the best songs of the Century by BMI!! That's interesting and it makes sense. Ok, so 'Baby I Need yot Loving' is no Wall of Sound, but it does contain that fragile quality that Spector could also put into a song... On a similar note, in the book 'The Heart of Rock & Soul' Dave Marsh writes that: Phil Spector called 'Bernadette' "a black man singing Bob Dylan". :-) I wonder where Marsh heard or read that? With regards Martin, Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:15:09 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Red Bird Sound series Ken Silverwood: > ...'Red Bird Sound, Vol 4: Dressed In Black' CD... Jimmy Botticelli: > Can anyone furnish info on that series? Nevah hurd of it! Wassup, live in a cave? :-) No, seriously, you can view the covers and tracklists for all four volumes in the S'pop photo section. Vol 3 is deleted. Dunno 'bout the others, which all, btw, contain tracks otherwise unavailable on CD (the Jelly Beans doing "He's Gone", anyone?). Click on each image for more readable larger versions: http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/lst Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:21:22 EST From: John Berg Subject: Re: Tuning down a "half step" Yes, there are people out there with "perfect pitch" who can hear "quarter notes" and "half notes". My mother is an example -- she knows instinctively "perfect C" and can hear everything based around that. Fortunately, for the rest of us there are now digital instruments that can tell us these things. That's how guitarists are able to tune their instruments on a noisy bandstand and remain in tune with the keyboards, for instance. I was involved in the "rediscovery" of blues/R&B singer-guitarist Robert Ward in 1989. He soon signed with Black Top Records and traveled down to their base in New Orleans to cut his first album (having recorded many 45s in the '60s with his band The Ohio Untouchables, later compiled on CD by Relic Records). For this "comeback" CD, Black Top wanted to re-record several of his great songs from the early '60s. The band recorded the "tracks", of course featuring Robert's unique guitar stylings using a Magnatone 280 "true vibrato" amp. Alas, given the fact that he was now many years older and had not been active for some while, Robert was not able to hit the high notes on many of the songs. Easy solution: Black Top simply slowed down the tape of tracks -- in this case by a full note, so that Robert could hit the highs -- then they "corrected" the pitch back to normal. Nobody was the wiser. John Berg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 16:12:38 -0000 From: Patrick Beckers Subject: Re: Whatever Happened to Happy Bill George wrote: > Now playing in musica: Jackie DeShannon's version of Whatever > Happened To Happy. Now if someone can play the Mojo Men... > Comparison comments anyone? I can add the Mojo Men version when there is room. Patrick Beckers Bonner/Gordon webpage: http://www.geocities.com/patriczik/bonner-gordon.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 16:57:19 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Bonner & Gordon songs / Alley & the Soul Sneekers Bill George wrote: > Now playing in musica: Jackie DeShannon's version of (Bonner & > Gordon's) Whatever Happened To Happy. Now if someone can play the > Mojo Men... Comparison comments anyone? Patrick Beckers: > I can add the Mojo Men version when there is room. Bonner/Gordon > webpage: http://www.geocities.com/patriczik/bonner-gordon.htm Hi Patrick, I checked out the list of Bonner & Gordon songs at your website. Here are some more, all contained on the eponymous LP of Alley & the Soul Sneekers, released on Capitol SW-11913 in 1979. Some of the songs bear earlier publishing dates, so additional previous versions might exist: Love Breakdown I'm Coming Down With A Thrill Understand Your Man Caught In Another Way With Love Soul Sneekers How Can You Leave Her Cheater's Honeymoon Running Away Like A Child Libertina Let The Music Begin "I'm Coming Down With A Thrill" was written by (That) Alan Gordon and Carole Bayer Sager. All the others are solo Alan Gordon compositions. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:50:34 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Radio Radio Nick Archer wrote: > If the stations there are ignoring their heritage, and not playing > all the great music made right there, it's a shame. THAT pretty much sums up all of my personal feelings about music and America today...Thanks. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:23:02 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Four Tops and Spector Martin Jensen wrote: > Dave Marsh writes that Phil Spector called 'Bernadette' "a black > man singing Bob Dylan". :-) I wonder where Marsh heard or read that? I have a tape of Phil S. on a radio show commenting on "Reach Out" (not "Bernadette") being "Four Tops doing Dylan," and he sings along for a bit with the lead vocal to demonstrate his premise. Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 10:24:29 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Alley & the Soul Sneekers / Carl Hall Mick Patrick wanted me to share some of my memories of working with Carl Hall. Let me begin by saying there are singers, and there are singers, and then there's Carl Hall. Truly, this man could hit such high notes that Lassie and Rin Tin Tin could hear him in canine heaven! I first met Carl in the mid '70s through another legendary singer, the late Tasha Thomas. They were both singing on my demos, and no cover record could equal the performances I got from Tasha and Carl. When I played one of those demos for the great Jack Nitzsche, "Love Breakdown", he brought the head of Capital Records to my home, and that is how Alley and the Soul Sneekers came about. "How can you leave her behind" is one of the best things on the lp. It is my tribute to Phil Spector, a man who really influenced me like so many of us. I hope somebody plays it on musica. Ronnie Spector also recorded it in the '80s. My other Spector link is a song Darlene Love did I co wrote with Paul Shaffer, "Love Must Be Love". Carl invited me to his apartment for dinner, an honor for me. He took me in his music room where he had on his wall about 75 beautiful professional photos, all black artists except one, a picture of ME! I said, "Carl, tell me the truth, you just put that on the wall 'cause I was comin over". I'm sure it came right off when I left. I love Carl, and his wife Nettie. On another note, today my Son Christian, an S'Pop member, and his wife Giovanna presented Annette and I with our first grandchild, a boy, Joshua. WE are really blessed. Best, That alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 11:55:56 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Originals vs Covers > Likewise (the Beatles') "Money" which surely beats the original. Bill George: > My favorite is the Flaming Lizards 80s version. Not mine's...I always thought the Kingsmen's 'live' version took the slice. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:49:29 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: When You Move It In The Room On Cliff Richard's new CD, Wanted, he does covers he's always wanted to do including "When You Walk In The Room", thus proving Cliff is truly the father of folk rawk. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:56:24 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Kit Kats in Philly Nick, Thanks for sharing. The lp you got was the first Jamie lp by the Kit Kats, I think it was called It's About Time. The second lp on Jamie was a live on from the T-bar on MacDade Ave. Their third lp was the New Hope lp which was also the name of the band at that point. The only "greatest hits" lp was a ripoff on Virtue (guitar boogie) which were demos they did for that label before signing with Jamie. It was basically 50s covers like "Stranded In the Jungle" and such. Hardly their "hits". It's sad how radio distorts the truth. Just like "classic rock" stations exploit their past by ignoring many of the acts that use to be played in the early days of FM (Burrito Bros., the Move, Bonzo Doodah Dog Band, etc.) What bothers me is that young kids on college radio playing oldies" All they seem to do is mimic what they heard the commercial oldies stations do. No concept of playing B-sides or album cuts. The Doors have been reduced to a four song act. Forget about ever hearing Love on the radio. The Beach Boys don't exist once they left Capitol. Hell, even "Breakaway" is non-existant. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sun, 16 Nov 2003 09:44:18 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Tuning down a "half step" I can remember taking musical dictation in music class in high school. The teacher would tell us the starting note and play a melody which we had to write down all the notes for without any instrument. I was bored because I was lousy at it, but my buddy was bored because he had perfect pitch and could tell the notes upon hearing them. It was too easy for him! I remember my music teacher saying that perfect pitch was a kind of curse. A car would make a corner too fast and the tires would squeal. Because it was slightly offkey it would drive anybody with perfect pitch up the wall. Kind of like chalk squeaking on the blackboard. Most people have what is known as relative pitch. Listen to "In My Life" by the Beatles. The harpsichord is actually just a piano that George Martin sped up. Playing with the tape speed is another old trick. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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