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Spectropop - Digest Number 1112



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 26 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. "Wings of Love"; Beverly Sisters; Chants; doo-wop; more
           From: Country Paul 
      2. Tiny Tim
           From: Phil Milstein 
      3. Phil's Spectre, Spectropop; Folk rock; Kit Kats; more
           From: Country Paul 
      4. Re: Whatever Happened to Happy / Chicago 67 & 68 / with a Z
           From: Phil Milstein 
      5. Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah)
           From: Dave Heasman 
      6. Re: The Incredible String band
           From: Paul Bryant 
      7. Re: Phil's Spectre and the Origins of Folk Rock
           From: Alan V. Karr 
      8. Manhattan Transfer / Beach Boys Live / Beatles and Big Ed
           From: Alan Gordon 
      9. Doo Wop - Help required
           From: Paul Bryant 
     10. Re: Bobby Darin sings Bonner & Gordon
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     11. Shadow Morton & Vanilla Fudge
           From: Mick Patrick 
     12. Re: Doo Wop - Help required
           From: Dave Heasman 
     13. Re: Doo Wop - Help required
           From: James Botticelli 
     14. Re: Poor CD
           From: Clark Besch 
     15. Re: Doo Wop - Help required
           From: Steve Harvey 
     16. Re: "Don't Give Up On Me"
           From: Phil Milstein 
     17. Re: Fading Yellow vol 6 & 7 cds now out!
           From: Orion 
     18. Kit Kats
           From: Steve Harvey 
     19. John, Paul, Don and Buck
           From: Steve Harvey 
     20. Re: Doo Wop - Help required
           From: Harry Jay 
     21. Ritchie Adams
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     22. Four Tops and Spector... / new addition to Musica
           From: Martin Jensen 
     23. Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah)
           From: Shawn Baldwin 
     24. Re: Doo Wop - Help required
           From: Joe Peel 
     25. Re: John, Paul, Don and Buck
           From: steveo 
     26. John Andrews, arranger
           From: steveo 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2003 19:48:14 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: "Wings of Love"; Beverly Sisters; Chants; doo-wop; more Never heard it before, Part 1: "Wings of Love," by Nino Tempo & April Stevens, White Whale WW-248, 1962. WFMU's Monica Lynch played it today, and it pinned my ears back! Sort of "Wimoweh" meets Phil Spector recording the Mamas and Papas. Came home to discover I had it on a 45 - but it didn't sound as full or rich as the version I heard on the air, apparently from a Rev-ola CD. So, questions: (1) Is it indeed Rev-ola? (2) Is the CD version a remix? (3) I already have the Varese CD; is there much more on the Rev-ola that's missing from the Varese? Help, please! Never heard it before, Part 2: The UK members of this gang will be all over me like a blanket, but today, for the first time, I heard a track by The Beverly Sisters (again on WFMU, natch) called "For You," the old standard. It sounded like the Paris Sisters with the background group brought forward over a Mantovani accompaniment. I even thought, while listening, it might have been Patience and Prudence grown up, but the orchestra was too lush for the US teen market. Monica Lynch said there was a UK album ("The Enchanting Beverly Sisters") but probably no CD reissue. Everything about them is news to me. I invite you wonderful teachers to teach me, please! Martin Roberts: > I'm extremely jealous to here that you have the Chants "Respectable" > on Tru-Eko....You asked if the Chants on Verve are the same group. > Yes they are. Apparently, "Respectable" was issued five times; twice > on Tru-Eko 3567 & 3577, MGM 13008 (allegedly a reissue of the Tru-Eko > release), all from '61, a re-recording on U.W.R. 4243 released '62 > and the final(?) one the U.W.R. recording but shortened by fading the > end, credited to Jimmy Soul & The Chants, 20th Century 413 '63. I remembered the MGM release when you mentioned it, but didn't know about the rest of them - nor the personnel! thanks for the remarkable update. (And here I thought this was just a little one-off.) Martin again: > Jerome Bros. production...The Cupids "Pretty Baby", an original Times > Square Records release. This was also new to me, Martin. It sure has that Slim Rose sound, even if the Jeromes did it. Thanks for the track! While on doowop, That Alan: > "Whispering Bells" - Dell Vikings, "I Remember" by a group I CAN`T > remember! "Whispering Bells" was the Dot Records follow-up to "Come Go With Me." The Del Vikings had cleaved in twain; another group, with two L's in "Dell," did a track called "Cool Shake" on Mercury, which was very different, and swung like crazy. And as you discovered, Alan, "I Remember" is by the Five Discs, released on three labels (Emge, Vik and Rust). It is one of the all- time great New York sounds, and has one of the most beautiful falsettos ever recorded, in my opinion. The lead singer has passed on, but The Five Discs continue to perform, and can be heard around the New York area. A follow-up a few years later, "Never Let You Go," on Cheer (1962 or '63), featured one of the best doo-wop bass parts you'll ever hear. Clark: > I don't know who many of the artists are, but I sure like the music. > Examples: The Status Cymbal's 1968 45 "In the Morning" which I heard > played on WKYC or WBZ back then. Agreed, Clark - this is one of most gorgeous vocal harmony records I know. Byron of that group works with Nick Archer of this group; he might be able to give you some info. Clark again: > "Little Wheel Spin & Spin" by Chakra. If you ever heard this, you'd > swear Heart's "Wilson sisters" played this song to death when it came > out in 1970. Is this the Buffy Sainte Marie song? It'd make sense for there to be a pop version. Is it out on CD? If not, is there any room for it in musica? (Hint, hint.) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 01:25:37 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Tiny Tim One needn't be a Tiny Tim fan to enjoy Ernie Clark's 1993 interview with him, the most comprehensive I've ever seen or heard, covering many phases of the great singer/historian's long career. The centerpiece is a discussion of the origin of each song on his debut LP, "God Bless Tiny Tim" (one of which, "Daddy, Daddy, What Is Heaven Like?," was by our own Artie Wayne). In typical fashion, though, Tiny used that basis as an opportunity to roam far and wide over the musical horizon, touching on, besides his beloved early 20th century American songs and singing stars: Richard Perry; Nico; George Harrison; Peter Yarrow; The Band; Bob Dylan; Lenny Bruce; Wavy Gravy; Linda Eastman/McCartney; his triumphant 1970 appearance at the Isle of Wight; Bing Crosby; and the vagaries of success in the music industry. The interview is at http://www.tinytim.org/interview.html. I highly recommend it to anyone even mildly curious about any of the aforementioned topics or, especially, Tiny Tim. --Phil Milstein -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 00:47:36 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Phil's Spectre, Spectropop; Folk rock; Kit Kats; more Monophonius: > The track list for the Phil's Spectre CD is a knockout. Here's a > list of twenty-five other tracks that could fill another CD. Many of > these were big hits, too. Everyone of them exhibit some phase of the > Spector approach. Mono, I appreciate your well-written and thoughtful opinion. I don't know if I'd totally agree with your "Spector in everything" analysis - you're either "doing Spector" or your going against doing him - but it goes without saying his influence is tremendous. I'd assumed, when I discovered and joined Spectropop, that Spector and Wilson were the double yellow center line of this group, the trunk from which the branches grow. But the Spector sounds also include some of his influences. One example leaps to mind: thinking about the sax break on "One Fine Day," which you proposed for "Spectre II," and the sax solo on "Da Doo Ron Ron" and others, think back to the baritone sax solo on Charlie Rich's first hit, "Lonely Weekends" on Phillips International, predating that by a couple of years. Spector gets credit for the sound, but Rich (or Sam Phillips or arranger Bill Justis) "invented" it. It would be interesting to trace back records containing elements of Spector's various soundscapes - the full-yet-spare Teddy Bears texture, the gentle lushness of The Spectors 3 and the Paris Sisters and of course the famous Wall - and find out if he had actually heard and been influenced by them. Meanwhile, I suggest starting "Spectre III" with Dave Edmunds' "Maybe" and "Born To Be With You," Kook E. Jarr's "Pledging My Love," and The Twilettes' "Where's My Baby." (Thanks, Phil, Mick, and David.) Phil M.: > "Everything prior to Bo Diddley was leading up to him; everything since > Bo Diddley has been in response to him." Or Chuck Berry, who could be credited with teaching the world how to play rock guitar. (Compoare pre-Chuck and post-Chuck guitar work and see.) And then there are his lyrics.... Albabe (as distinct from That Alan): > One of the things I think this group "stands for," is the appreciation > of, and "standing-up," for things an individual person may appreciate > that aren't necessarily appreciated by others. (Does that make sense, > or have I had too much coffee?) Plenty of sense - it's part of why I'm here. I get turned on to amazing stuff (i.e. the Twilettes above) I never would have known about or heard without this group. Also, as I've noted previously, with so many first-person participants and true students of the era on board, I can be pretty sure that what I read here is most likely true. Sure, some errata gets posted, but it also gets corrected pretty quickly. (I know from experience!) Albabe again: > I felt I sorta needed to say how much I like the Manhattan Transfer. Here's one of those groups. Our friend, Mike, is passionate about them; I respect them, and like some of the really good stuff in their ouevre. And their roots are in the right places, with broad-based interests. I've probably mentioned the beautiful "I Remain Truly Yours" by the Criterions on Cecilia, 1959 - that's Tim Hauser leading a delicious and well-written doo-wop ballad; well worth checking out. Bobster: > ...[N]ow that I have the Tams' wonderful "Untie Me"...I realize that > there was another Arlen label out of Philadelphia! Nothing to add except a cheer for what I think is the best and most often forgotten Tams hit (it was on an indie and their major hits were on a major label, ABC). And add a similar shout-out for.... Phil M.: > Van Dyke Parks's "Number 9," his delightful interpretation of Beethoven's > Ninth Symphony. ...and one of two Parks 45's on MGM, the other being the original "Come To The Sunshine." Phil M. again: > Speaking of which, are there many other examples of the bg-vox-only > instrumental versions of things? "Youm"...comes to mind, but there > must be others. The flip of "I Still Love Him," by the Joys on Valiant, is one (the A side is another track for "Spectre III"). Two other Capitol-family labels: subsidiary Prep, in the late '50's, had Ray Stevens' first releases and Janice Harper's hyperdramatic "That's Why I Was Born" among others; and Deltone, Dick Dale's label, which had Capitol numbers for some of its 45's and, I believe, at least one album. S. J. Dibai: > I must admit, though, I'm not quite willing to commit myself to a position > on what was the first folk-rock record! >From the '50's: Lonnie Donegan's "Rock Island Line"? Jimmie Rodgers' "Honeycomb" or some of the ballads like "Wonderful You"? Harry Belafonte's "Banana Boat Song"? For that matter, Bobby Darin's gorgeous "Lost Love" (flip of "Queen of the Hop," which actually got airplay in NYC)? The Tarriers' "Cindy Oh Cindy" which preceded their version of "Banana Boat Song"? Or the early 60's Nashville folk-country that crossed over to pop by Bobby Bare, George Hamilton IV, etc.? The Springfields' "Silver Threads and Golden Needles"? Of course the big breakouts were the Byrds' "Mr. Tambourine Man" and Simon & Garfunkel's "Sounds of Silence." You're right - let's not go there! Or let's.... Cousin Steve Harvey: > Maybe Cousin Paul could play the CD I made of my Kit Kats radio show, > from the mid-90s.... Steve, in the chaos of my life over the past few months, I hope I remembered to thank you! The CD of your show is fascinating - I didn't realize the group did so many remakes of their own material. Jamie Records has an in-print collection of the Kit Kats out there; details at http://www.jamguy.com/scripts/jamguycom/paper/Index.asp?ColumnID=147 . I believe current Jamie head Frank Lipsius is (or was) an S'pop member. And for those who are up for some fun and a crash course on some interesting history of Philadelphia music, www.jamguy.com is worth some touring time. (Not a commercial; just a recommendation.) Country Paul (off to get lost on a country road) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2003 19:01:38 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Whatever Happened to Happy / Chicago 67 & 68 / with a Z Bill George wrote: > If anyone is interested, I can also post Jackie DeShannon's version > of "Whatever Happened To Happy" to musica when space permits. Bingo! Clark Besch wrote: > Hi, I think you are right on your story about 25 or 6 to 4. With > all the talk of foriegn versions and comments on "Questions 67 & 68" > and other great early Chicago songs, I thought I'd combine the 2 and > play this rare Japanese version to Musica. It was certainly done in > 1971 when the song hit high on the charts the second time around. I > was blown away when I got this as a US Dj 45! Why would Columbia > make an English/Japanese Dj 45? Was anyone in the US going to play > the Japanese version?? One of those B-sides intended to force programmers to stick to playing the A-side? I love how it's all in Japanese, until the very end when the singer (Terry Kath? Robt. Lamm?) shouts out the mysterious title in English. Perhaps the phrase was simply too screwy to translate. > Many of you may also know the many songs the Buckinghams did that > were written by our James Holvay and Gary Beisber. Still on the > Chicago theme, Holvay's "Makin Up & Breakin Up" that was a > Buckinghams B side (twice!), was also recorded by the Missing Links > in 65 or so that included 3 future members of Chicago also!! There's > one big connection to all this somewhere. (?) If there was I imagine it was the Machiavellian manager/producer of The Buckinghams and Chicago (as well as other bands, such as Illinois Speed Press), James William Guercio. After adding The Beach Boys and Elton John to his stable around the mid-'70s, Guercio had become such a force in the music industry that he was even able to swing a deal to produce and direct his own feature film (the Robt. Blake-starring disaster Electra Glide In Blue), yet I haven't heard his name, at least in any contemporary reference, in years. Anyone know whatever became of him? Julio Nio wrote: > Nowadays, Karina is a regular in the romance (or gossip) magazines > because of her sentimental relationships with men who look much more > femenine than her. You mean she's the Spanish equivalent of Liza Minnelli? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 01:09:31 -0000 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah) That Alan Gordon: > Bill George wanted to know who was the artist who had a big hit with > Puccini's "Musetta`s waltz". It was "Don't You Know" by the wonderful > Della Reese. In the 50s & 60s there were a lot of US hits with tunes taken from classics. Copyright was a bit different in the UK and before the records were released here some extra clearance had to be got. This is why "It's Now Or Never" came out in the UK way after it did in the US. Jackie Wilson's "Night" was another that took ages to get released here. I don't think the Della Reese record above ever did get released in the UK. I certainly never heard it and I was an avid listener to the "right" radio shows in 59-60. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2003 17:31:54 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Re: The Incredible String band Art Longmire wrote: > Speaking of Collector's Choice, another CD I got this week was the > Incredible String Band's "5000 Layers/Hangman's Beautiful Daughter" - > a bit of a gamble since I had never heard anything by them, just > figured I would like them - I was right, they are one of the > outstanding mystical 60s bands. Speaking as the moderator of the Incredible String Band Yahoogroup, I'd say you your next purchase should be Wee Tam and the Big Huge. And always remember - amoebas are very small. pb ps - any other ISB fans out there? Come on and join - isb@yahoogroups.com - noisy, excitable, argumentative, very friendly etc etc - you're all very welcome. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 06:17:05 -0000 From: Alan V. Karr Subject: Re: Phil's Spectre and the Origins of Folk Rock Well, monophonius got me thinking, and after giving Phil's Spectre about 100 consecutive spins (a la Brian Wilson) it reminded me of so many more, mostly UK based superb Spector knockoffs, many by Andrew Oldham and also many arranged by the talented Charles Blackwell and Ivor Raymonde; DO YOU WANNA DANCE-Beach Boys SHANG A DOO LANG-Adrienne Posta/Poster LOVE HIT ME-The Orchids OO SHANG-A-LANG The Orchids WILL YOU BE MY LOVER TONIGHT-George Bean DA DOO RON RON-Andrew Oldham Orchestra (w/ Jagger!) RIGHT OF WAY-ALO Orchestra SOME OF YOUR LOVIN'-Dusty FUNNY HOW LOVE CAN BE-Ivy League Walker Bros other Righteous knockoffs like THE SUN AINT GONNA SHINE ANYMORE, Many of the DC5 records, produced/engineered by ex-Joe Meek assistant Adrian Kerridge. Meek could be thought of as the British Phil Spector, or vice versa but I dont think the similiarities were intentional. Supposely, Spector rang up Meek once and Meek accused him of stealing his sound! WHAT A SWEET THING THAT WAS, SOLDIER BOY-The Shirelles Although I think it lacks hooks at times, NOBODY KNOWS WHAT'S GOING ON...etc by The Chiffons Honorable mention to 80s Scots rockers Jesus & Mary Chain who tried to meld Surf, Velvet Underground, Industrial, Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd and the Ronettes into a unique sound. Apologies for any duplicate thoughts. re: folk-rock, I just go by what Roger McGuinn wrote to me via E- mail years ago (and I will always treasure his willingness to share his opinion w/ me)-The Searchers' Needles and Pins started it all. There is no electric 12-string on this 1963 recording! (amazingly, the sound was the result of the lead (Mike Pender) Gibson 345 Stereo and rhythm (John McNally) Hofner Club 60 guitars - when played in unison they simulated the sound of an electric 12 string. Regards, Alan V. Karr -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 14 Nov 2003 19:48:33 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Manhattan Transfer / Beach Boys Live / Beatles and Big Ed From: Mike Edwards. Subject: Manhattan Transfer. > Alan, I loved your message but you didn't once comment on the song > that was the inspiration for all this. I would appreciate hearing > your thoughts on the song title. There's no problem with a guy > sticking up for an artist he loves, I just wish someone would do the > same for poor Carol "Doctors' Orders" Douglas. Certainly no offense to you or your taste, Mike. My comment wasn't meant to be about the song, in fact I didn't get a chance to hear it, as I was gone last weekend, and when I came back it was no longer in Musica. My comment was concerning people's statements that say that something is "the best" that someone has done. My experience from working in publishing for 25 years has been that when someone says that a certain song (for instance) is a performers best, it sometimes implies to others (whether meaning to or not) that the rest of that particular catalogue is superfluous at best. As some reviewers do it to imply that they have actual knowledge or taste. I usually try not to use terms like "best" myself, so I don't get into trouble... but that's just me. With my experience in most of the "arts," I find I don't usually think that anything is someone's "best." It's usually just one of many separate experiences to me. For instance, I'd be hard-pressed to have a fave Beatle album. That opinion seems to change with the weather. So when I responded, I was just a bit coffee'd-up and reminiscing how much I liked the Transfer way back when. Who's Carol Douglas? I know these next two asides aren't specifically S'Pop material, but I thought they were pretty neato: For any Beach Boy fans. If you haven't checked out the DVD of the "Beach Boys: Good Timin' at Knebworth England 1980" you're missing a really great experience. It's brimming with nice recordings and performances of some really fantastic songs and harmonies. One song by Al Jardine called Lady Lynda has an amazing acapella break that gave me chills. Dennis plays drums, and what he lacks in finesse, he more than makes up for in strength. He really beats the crap outta those skins. Carl, as usual, sings like a gutsy yet gossamer rock and roll angel. Brian sings okay but looks pretty spaced-out. And Mike does his usual snitty Bantam Rooster impersonation. I'm curious if anyone in here might have watched (and listened to) the new DVD: Ed Sullivan Presents the Beatles. It's the first four Ed Sullivan programs with the Beatles, presented as whole shows. Great stuff. The first three shows in February of '64 are the ultimate example of Beatlemania. But what I wasn't prepared for was their September '65 program. They seemed more relaxed (except maybe Ring'o) a year later, and, interestingly, the show is introduced by Ed as, "Before we start tonight's Beatles show..." I guess this was a, sort-of, Beatles and Their Friends Special. Great relaxed set. Cilla Black also does a couple of nice toons. I've seen bits and pieces of the Beatles performances from this '65 show over the years, but seeing it in it's entirety for the first time since it was originally aired was quite fantastic. I'm curious if anyone has any technical info on these shows: On the first and third program, the Beatles' guitars are tuned down to Eb rather than E. Either that, or the speed has been time-sinc'ed a half-tone lower/slower. I'm wondering if the group tuned down so it would be just slightly easier to hit the vocal notes - maybe making up for being a little nervous on American Television for the first time... or was there a technical mistake running the film at the wrong speed(?). Any ideas? peace, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 02:33:08 -0800 (PST) From: Paul Bryant Subject: Doo Wop - Help required Dear all I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting myself? There are so many compilations and all of them overlap and after a while (like now) every new compilation I see has lots of songs I already have on it. Is there any solution to this? Apologies if this is not the right forum to ask - I know you don't usually discuss doo wop. pb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 11:47:05 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Bobby Darin sings Bonner & Gordon Martin Roberts: > As for "Whatever Happened To Happy" - what a great song and the > (Righteous) Brothers certainly do it justice. These two songs are > sure to have brightened Peter (Richmond)'s day (and Bill Reed, > assuming Nick de Caro arranged "Whatever Happened..."). My day > will be brightened if the Bobby Darin version turns out to be > arranged by Jack Nitzsche!... Sorry to disappoint you Martin, the Bobby Darin/Bonner & Gordon tracks were produced by Koppelman & Rubin, engineered by Stan Ross & Brooks Arthur & (wait for it) arranged and conducted by, da da - Donald (Don) Peake. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 12:56:17 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Shadow Morton & Vanilla Fudge Anyway, back to my quest for Shadow Morton information... Does anyone have a copy of the Atco single "Season Of The Witch, Parts 1 & 2" by Vanilla Fudge? If so, perhaps you could let me know on which side of the record the Shadow Morton recitation appears? Part 2, I presume? I'd also like to know exactly how the 8:55 LP version is split into two, and where in the song Part 2 begins. The words Shadow recites are taken from the Shangri-Las' song (Mercury) "I'll Never Learn". Is this fact mentioned on the label? A label scan would be nice. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 13:29:22 -0000 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Re: Doo Wop - Help required Paul asked: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting myself? > There are so many compilations and all of them overlap and after a while > (like now) every new compilation I see has lots of songs I already have > on it. Is there any solution to this? Apologies if this is not the right > forum to ask - I know you don't usually discuss doo wop. Hi Paul, Not really a doo-wop fan myself, but there's a huge amount of expertise on the UK "Shakin' All Over" Yahoo group. Have you thought about joining a public library? regards Dave H -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 09:19:20 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Doo Wop - Help required Paul Bryant wrote: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting myself? Short answer? You can't.. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 15:25:20 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Poor CD Mike Dugo wrote: > Here's the track listing for Sound City's new "Help The Poor" CD. > It's amazing how for years The Poor's music was generally > unavailable, and now in a span of 6 weeks there are two CD > collections by the group.... Mike, Thanks for the info. Indeed it is a great thing and a shame at the same time. I will buy this Cd for the two extra tracks, but had they contacted the right people, they could have gotten stereo versions and unreleased tracks. Sometimes, it's hard to know who has what, I know, but sometimes I wish labels would ask around about such possiblities than just going to the vaults and assuming it's all there. Thanks again, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 07:30:18 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Doo Wop - Help required Paul asked: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting > myself? There are so many compilations and all of them overlap and > after a while (like now) every new compilation I see has lots of > songs I already have on it. Is there any solution to this? Apologies > if this is not the right forum to ask - I know you don't usually > discuss doo wop. Compilations are often flawed due to copyright restrictions and sheer laziness. I got the Rhino Doo Wop boxsets, 03 of them, and yet "Rainy Day Bells" still managed to elude me. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 10:48:44 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: "Don't Give Up On Me" Andrew Jones wrote: > Pardon my iggerance, but is this song "Don't Give Up On Me" also the > title song on soul man Solomon Burke's recent album? Burke's song of that title is a Dan Penn composition. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 09:26:22 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: Fading Yellow vol 6 & 7 cds now out! Dang I just now put together the money to buy the first 5. ACK!! However, thanks so much for the information, back to scrimping and saving again. Anyone have any extra aluminum cans? LOL Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 07:52:28 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Kit Kats Country Paul, Yes, you did thank me. I've been too busy grading papers to reply, sorry. However, Mighty Mark Frumento says there is not enough room on musica for a whole show. Maybe you could put on the Tik Taks doing the instrumental version of "Let's Get Lost" on Guyden (Jamie Guyden liked to see his name on the label) and the tune "That You Love" on Paramount since neither are on the double CD on Jamie. Kit Stewart was a beautiful dreamer who never made the big time. He always seemed to be working some new angle or at some new business when I'd run into him. I remember the first time I interview him he was running a produce store. He was so tired that he actually fell asleep midquestion. The last time I talked with Kit was right after the Jamie Cd had come out. He had moved to my old state of Delaware where he was producing a cable tv for senior citizens. He invited me to his birthday party, but it never happened. I only found out about his death cruising the web. Even in Philly there was nothing about his passing. He deserved better. Cousin Steve Harvey: Maybe Cousin Paul could play the CD I made of my Kit Kats radio show, from the mid-90s.... I believe current Jamie head Frank Lipsius is (or was) an S'pop member. And for those who are up for some fun and a crash course on some interesting history of Philadelphia music, http://www.jamguy.com is worth some touring time. (Not a commercial; just a recommendation.) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 08:00:10 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: John, Paul, Don and Buck Albabe; > I'm curious if anyone has any technical info on these shows: On the > first and third program, the Beatles' guitars are tuned down to Eb > rather than E. Either that, or the speed has been time-sinc'ed a half- > tone lower/slower. I'm wondering if the group tuned down so it would be > just slightly easier to hit the vocal notes - maybe making up for being > little nervous on American Television for the first time... or was > there a technical mistake running the film at the wrong speed(?). Tuning down a halfstep in order to hit the high notes was a popular trick among singers. Labelmates, Buck Owens and Don Rich, use to drop their Teles all the time. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 09:10:07 -0700 (Mountain Standard Time) From: Harry Jay Subject: Re: Doo Wop - Help required Paul Bryant wrote: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting myself? Hi Paul, I'm a '50s & '60s Doo-Wop singer, with several groups, & still buy some of my friends music, & found that the only way to save money is to go to Amazon.com, & Half.com. I've had great deals from them. Most of the time the CDs are brand new. Good luck. Harry Jay -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:30:41 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Ritchie Adams Does anybody know if Ritchie Adams is still alive? And if so, how one might go about contacting him? Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:32:56 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Four Tops and Spector... / new addition to Musica Hi When listening to some Four Tops albums today, I began to fantasise about how great a collaboration between the group and Spector could have been. I don't know if I'm the only one who does this, but if I happen to listen to a particular suitable song or singer, I often think 'this could have sounded great with a Wall of Sound backing'. You know, picturing which touches Spector might have added, had he worked on the song or recorded the singer. Concerning the Four Tops, I feel that Levi Stubbs' incredibly expressive vocals really could have fit the Wall of Sound very well, similar to the way Tina Turner's did. Even though I love 'Reach Out, I'll Be There' perhaps the group's most Spectorish production I wonder what monster this great song could have evolved into in the hands of the master. In fact, I seem to remember reading somewhere that Spector was somewhat impressed by the abovementioned song. Is this correct, or has it just been conjured up in my twisted mind after listening to too much Four Tops and daydreaming about what could have been? :-) On another note, I have uploaded a Danish single from the seventies, which might interest you guys. I think it has a slightly Spectorish touch it's feel reminds me a bit of 'My Sweet Lord'. Everyone in Denmark knows and loves this song. Some years ago when the country's biggest newspaper carried out a national survey in order to find out, which books, movies, songs etc were the most popular, this song was voted the best Danish song ever by the readers. I hope you'll enjoy it despite it being sung in Danish Finally, I would just like to say how glad I am for finding this cool place on the web. All this knowledge of and passion for good music! I learn something new everyday checking out the site... With regards Martin, Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 10:23:43 -0600 From: Shawn Baldwin Subject: Re: Classical pop - Della (not Dinah) That Alan Gordon: > Bill George wanted to know who was the artist who had a big hit with > Puccini's "Musetta`s waltz". It was "Don't You Know" by the wonderful > Della Reese. Della has a fabulous cataloge of Music I have serveral of her greatest hits packages and love everything on them just about! Shawn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 12:20:36 EST From: Joe Peel Subject: Re: Doo Wop - Help required Paul Bryant wrote: > I'm a UK doo wop fan. How can I feed my habit without bankrupting myself? Hi PB....please send a want list to: Dinosaur Vinyl, 1054 Avenue C, Bayonne, NJ, 07002....very reasonale prices. Thanks, Joe Peel -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 10:59:25 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: Re: John, Paul, Don and Buck Steve Harvey: > Tuning down a halfstep in order to hit the high notes was a popular > trick among singers. Labelmates, Buck Owens and Don Rich, use to > drop their Teles all the time. steve...do you have perfect pitch?...or how are you noticing this tuning down a 1/2 step? steveo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 26 Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2003 11:07:20 -0800 (PST) From: steveo Subject: John Andrews, arranger anyone out there have any info on 1960's pop arranger john andrews? any help would be great! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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