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Spectropop - Digest Number 1097



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Final Jerome Brothers on musica
           From: Martin Roberts 
      2. Re: Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
           From: MopTopMike 
      3. Re: "Phil's Spectre" CD / Nino Tempo
           From: Orion 
      4. Lesley, Jeromes, Stu Phillips
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      5. Re: Lollipops
           From: Clark Besch 
      6. Re: Artie Wayne, That Alan Gordon, Jimmy Holvay & the power of music
           From: Clark Besch 
      7. Re: James Holvay / Mike & Michael
           From: Mick Patrick 
      8. Re: More Jerome
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      9. Re: Goldie & the Gingerbreads
           From: Phil Milstein 
     10. Re: Beverly
           From: Richard Havers 
     11. Doo-wop
           From: Richard Williams 
     12. Secret Loves
           From: Don Charles 
     13. Re: Lesley's hits
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Doo-wop
           From: That Alan Gordon 
     15. Sam and Ed Chalpin
           From: S'pop Team 
     16. Bill Champlin - help
           From: Alan Gordon 
     17. Phil's Spectre
           From: monophonius 
     18. Chicago / Manhattan Transfer
           From: Alan Gordon 
     19. It's My Party and I'm Gay if I want to..
           From: Norman 
     20. Faux Shangs
           From: Stefan Wriedt 
     21. Questions 25 or 6 to 4
           From: Alan Gordon 
     22. Bobster's Turn to Omit! ! !
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     23. Re: Phil's Spectre
           From: Martin Roberts 
     24. Re: CTA / This 'n' That / Phil vs. Bo
           From: Phil Milstein 
     25. Re: Phil's Spectre / Boys Town
           From: Orion 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 04 Nov 2003 23:54:08 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Final Jerome Brothers on musica Hi Country Paul, I'm extremely jealous to here that you have the Chants "Respectable" on Tru-Eko. As they say, "location, location, location" and, of course, mature years! You asked if the Chants on Verve are the same group. Yes they are. Apparently, "Respectable" was issued five times; twice on Tru-Eko 3567 & 3577, MGM 13008 (allegedly a reissue of the Tru-Eko release), all from '61, a re-recording on U.W.R. 4243 released '62 and the final(?) one the U.W.R. recording but shortened by fading the end, credited to Jimmy Soul & The Chants, 20th Century 413 '63. I dare say this was released to cash-in on Jimmy's success with, "If You Wanna Be Happy". About the same time period the 'rip-off' label, Spin O Rama, released an LP, "Jimmy Soul and The Belmonts" with three 'Chants' tracks plus two by The Belmonts from Mohawk and five make-weights by Charlie Francis. So if Jimmy AND Peter Antell were in the group at the same time, a real vocal super group! And I can't wait for John Clemente's interview to appear! I've played one more (and I promise it will be my last for awhile) Jerome Bros. production to musica: The Cupids "Pretty Baby", an original Times Square Records release. Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 00:49:16 -0000 From: MopTopMike Subject: Re: Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? I don't think the version by Chicago got any real ACB/Top 40 airplay until it was issued by popular demand on a 45 in late 1970. The Copper and Brass 45 from Louisville, KY came out in the summer of 1970. But Tension, a white R&B horn outfit from New Haven, CT had one of the first releases of that tune as a "pre Chicago released 45" cover...It was released on the Poison Ring label in late January 1970. MopTopMike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 04 Nov 2003 18:59:33 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: "Phil's Spectre" CD / Nino Tempo > New At S'pop Recommends: "Phil's Spectre" CD (Ace) > > . . . Clydie King's 'Missin' My Baby', Hale and the Hushabyes' > 'Yes Sir, That's My Baby', Nino Tempo's 'Boys Town' and Carol > Connors' 'My Baby Looks, But He Don't Touch'? All in pristine > sound on one friendly-priced disc? Pinch me . . . > (David A. Young) > > To read David's full review, visit the S'pop Recommends section: > http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/index2003.htm#PhilsSpectre I have tried to find a good copy of Nino Tempo's Boys Town for a long time. It is IMHO one of his better pieces. Orion ----------------------------------------------------------- S'pop Reminder: Bagpipes, Boys Town And Other Deep Purple Productions The Nino Tempo Interview by Bill Reed An exclusive interview with the one and only Nino Tempo is the latest installation at S'pop. Originally a child actor, and a jazz saxophonist at heart, Tempo and his sister April Stevens scooped a Grammy in 1963 for their unique interpretation of "Deep Purple". Having played on a slew of Phil Spector-produced classics as a member of the legendary Wrecking Crew, he went on to record some of the most talked about "Wall Of Sound" epics ever committed to magnetic tape. http://www.spectropop.com/NinoTempo/index.htm Enjoy! The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 01:03:17 EST From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Lesley, Jeromes, Stu Phillips Mike from Liverpool asked about Lesley Gore's hits other than You Don't Own Me and It's My Party--she also hit real big here in the US with She's A Fool in 1963. Those 3 are her biggest smashes. California Nights in '67 was a kind of comeback record that dented the top 10, and, of course, she charted, among others, with Maybe I Know (my personal fave!), Summer and Sandy, That's The Way Boys Are, and a tune I've never even heard called "Look of Love", not to be confused with the Bacharach-David tune from CASINO ROYALE, which incidentally, Dusty, Lesley's "sister", recorded! May have missed a posting BTW, my Yahoo connection was disconnected for a few days, oh WELL. Steve and Bill Jerome are among my favorite 6Ts producers and I better hurry and get that Fifth Estate CD. Didn't know there was another Stu Phillips--a country singer on RCA. This is a different person, isn't it?! Stu of Colpix fame etc. ("Stu Who?") recorded a solo on Capitol if i'm not mistaken, the one Nancy Sinatra told him was one of her very favorite LPs. Can anybody recommend this one. Finally thought I'd mention a few of my most recent acquisitions from the one and only Beverly Records: "Ah Ha Yeah" (Sugar 'N' Spice, Kapp, 1966) "Can I Carry Your Balloon" (Swampseeds, Epic, 1968) "Blue-Green Eyes" (Sundowners, Decca, 1969?) "Miss Julie's Private School/Circles Within A Square" (The Tapestry, Compass, 1968) "Don't Fool Yourself" (John Summers, Congress, 1965 or '66) "Back on the Street Again" (Sunshine Co. 1967, Imperial). Tapestry on first hearing is terrific, lead singer has a Micky Dolenz kind of feel, music is great psych-rock. Sundowners are totally boss, never heard them before either. And--hadn't heard the Swampseeds (Midwestern group that got some airplay in Chicago) or the Sunshine Co. records in 35 years! What a TREAT! Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 06:26:23 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Lollipops JJ and all the others, I have a radio show promoting the Lollipops' "Freight Train to Boston" I can play to Musica when space is freed up if you want to hear it. I think for this they added Bob Wills and His Texas Cowboys! The song's OK, but they don't quite have the Kennedy Boston accent that the Hardly Worthit Players do, y'know? It's funny to hear them say "Boston". The lyrics say he only knew one girl from Boston. Hmm, so he must not have known her long. :) Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 07:28:46 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Artie Wayne, That Alan Gordon, Jimmy Holvay & the power of music Artie, Alan and James H (WELCOME ABOARD!), I agree with all that Artie and Alan said in these 2 posts! Music not only has a universal healing effect, but it gives you memories of how and when and where you were when a song that influenced your life occurred. It brightens the day and night, even if the song is sad or happy. It helps me always! In my faves sits "Midnight Mary", "Kind of A Drag", "Girls in Love", "Put the Clock Back on the Wall", "Hey Baby, They're Playing Our Song", "You Know What I Mean" and others by you guys. A couple of those run under 2 minutes, but what great music can be made in under 2 minutes!! Mike Smith sure knows this and we all thank him and hope he gets better soon! I used to think all I wanted was to listen to my music, but my good friend and fellow Spectropopper Doug Richard, whom I shared the airwaves with 2 decades ago enlightened me into not only all the people out there who liked this 60's music, but also into the artists' stories themselves. I owe to him so much. Now, I get the chance to have some input into Cd releases and it is great! I remember sending a tape of some unreleased stuff of the E-Types to Bob Irwin and soon enough, Alan Gordon's "Put the Clock Back on the Wall" was out on Cd on Sundazed! I might have never heard the song had it not been for Doug doing the radio show with me! The sharing of music is timeless and that makes Spectropop so cool! Artists, producers, and fans sharing memories and music! I was making a Cdr of the original withdrwan Heart "Magazine" LP for a friend and decided to fill it up with just some fave female obscurities. I wished I could play them Musica for everyone to comment on. I don't know who many of the artists are, but I sure like the music. Examples: The Status Cymbal's 1968 45 "In the Morning" which I heard played on WKYC or WBZ back then. "Happy New Year" by Beverly! Wow, what a record--and written by Rany Newman, released early 1967. It's like Cat Stevens' Spectorish productions with a female lead. I think I remember Beverly being the voice heard in the middle break of Simon & Garfunkel's "Fakin' It". Sergio Mendes & Brasil 66' "Masquerade". What a great obscurity! "Little Wheel Spin & Spin" by Chakra. If you ever heard this, you'd swear Heart's "Wilson sisters" played this song to death when it came out in 1970. I know KEYN in Wichita Kansas did. And talk about female Spector sound production adding in a little psychedelia, how bout the "Chantelles (of London)" doing "Out of my Mind"? All of these are very different sounding, but all great obscurities that people should hear. I don't do my radio show anymore, so anyone who wants to hear these, gimme room and they're on! Bottom line is, I agree with music being something that will always inspire us! Take care, Clark. (The soapbox is now available.) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 08:29:09 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: James Holvay / Mike & Michael I'm sure I speak for many members when I wish a very warm S'pop welcome to James Holvay, songwriter, producer and member of the Mob. Thanks for yet another great Kane & Abel story, James. Can I ask you to share some memories of another favourite record of mine: "My Neighborhood" by Mike & Michael, released on Constellation 156, in 1965. It's another excellent Righteous Brothers-style disc co- written and co-produced by yourself. Tell me, which came first, Kane & Abel or Mike & Michael? And who were Mike & Michael? I believe this record exists on another label too. Correct? For those who haven't heard this tasty piece of Windy City blue-eyed soul, it is currently playing at musica: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 04 Nov 2003 14:36:57 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: More Jerome Phil M. and Country Paul both share my curiosity regarding the disappearance of Bill Jerome. I sent an email to Steve asking the BIG question "What happened to Bill?" Thus far I've gotten, as the Beatles would say, "No Reply". Best, That Alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 04 Nov 2003 14:29:43 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Goldie & the Gingerbreads Mick Patrick asked: > I'm on another information quest. Sorry. Does anyone possess a > copy of the LP "The Best Of The Girl Groups / The Girl Groups > Are The Best", issued on the Pricewise (Scepter) label in 1965? > If so, please be so kind as to tell me the songwriter and > publisher credits for the two Goldie & the Gingerbreads tracks. John Grecco, not on Spectropop, but more than friendly to our mission, has that LP, and reports: "Take My Hand" Goldie & The Gingerbreads Writers: B. Lance, F. Robbins Publisher: Zann Music "V.I.P." Goldie & The Gingerbreads Writers: B. Lance, F. Robbins Publisher: Zann Music The tracks are the last two songs on side B The title of the Lp is "The Best Of The Girl Groups" The release # is: Pricewise P4004 Released: 1965 James Holvay wrote: > Mick: I don't have a clue. I worked opposite them in 1963 in New > York at the Times Square Hotel. That was the first self-contained > girl group that I ever saw. They were pretty damn good. Didn't > Goldie go on to be the lead singer for a horn group called Ten > Wheel Drive? Yes indeed, under the (real?) name of Genya Ravan. Ten Wheel Drive's first album received a lot of airplay on Allison Steele's show on WNEW-FM (NYC), which brings me to an anecdote I should be more embarrassed to share than I am. In 1970, at the tender age of 13, I attended my first-ever rock concert. It was Ten Years After, still hot on the heels of their Woodstock success. The moment the Madison Square Garden lights went down the entire 13,000-seat auditorium immediately began to reek of a sweetish odor I had never experienced before (but certainly would again), but that is another story for another day. More to the point, Alvin Lee & Co. took the stage and started in with their bombastic English-white-boy blooze-on-speed routine. I patiently sat through the first two numbers, figuring this to be a sort of mini-set designed to let the band loosen up before introducing the star and getting the show proper underway. But when they continued apace, I could no longer hold my tongue. Turning to my friend, more knowledgeable in such matters than I, I asked, "Where the hell is the chick singer?" "What chick singer?," he replied. "Doesn't Ten Wheel Drive have a chick singer?" "We're not seeing Ten Wheel Drive, you idiot, we're seeing Ten Years After!" My very first concert, and I had gone to see the wrong band entirely. I wish I could report it was my last such elementary mistake, but in fact there were more to come. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 12:23:30 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Beverly Clark Besch wrote: > "Happy New Year" by Beverly! Wow, what a record--and written > by Rany Newman, released early 1967. It's like Cat Stevens' > Spectorish productions with a female lead.I think I remember > Beverly being the voice heard in the middle break of Simon & > Garfunkel's "Fakin' It". The Beverly in the middle of 'Fakin It' is Beverly Martyn, the wife of English singer John Martyn. "Good morning Mr Leitch have you had a busy day?" Leitch is Donovan's surname. I guess Paul must have met and got to know Beverly and John when he was living in England and doing the folk club circuit. Great, and interesting, post btw Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 12:50:30 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Doo-wop > Country Paul, some of my all time doo wop songs: > "Once upon a time" - Rochelle and the Candles > "Everyday of the week" - the Students > "So Young" - The Schoolboys > "Whispering Bells" - Dell Vikings > "I Remember" by a group I CAN`T remember! > That alan Could be it "I Remember" by Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs -- one of the follow-ups to "Stay"? (I can't remember whether it came before or after "Come Along".) Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 14:43:22 +0000 From: Don Charles Subject: Secret Loves > Seriously, Lesley's composition "My Secret Love" was one of > the musical highlights of the movie Grace Of My Heart, agreed? Agreed. And remember, Miss Lesley also recorded a wonderful, exuberant version of the original "Secret Love" in the '60s, which for some reason wasn't released. You can find it on the still-in-print IT'S MY PARTY box set from Bear Family. Don "Stuffed Animal" Charles -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 11:42:31 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Lesley's hits Bob Rashkow wrote: > Mike from Liverpool asked about Lesley Gore's hits other than You > Don't Own Me and It's My Party--she also hit real big here in the > US with She's A Fool in 1963. Those 3 are her biggest smashes. > California Nights in '67 was a kind of comeback record that dented > the top 10, and, of course, she charted, among others, with Maybe > I Know (my personal fave!), Summer and Sandy, That's The Way Boys > Are, and a tune I've never even heard called "Look of Love", not to > be confused with the Bacharach-David tune from CASINO ROYALE, which > incidentally, Dusty, Lesley's "sister", recorded! Wasn't "Judy's Turn To Cry" also a pretty big hit? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 11:05:05 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Doo-wop Richard, I did a little research and found out the song "I Remember" that I like was done by the 5 Discs. Best, that alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 18:52:19 -0000 From: S'pop Team Subject: Sam and Ed Chalpin Mick Patrick wrote: > Move over, Dora Hall. Step aside, Mrs Miller. Make way for > Sam Chalpin, pop singer, age 65.......... I borrowed a pile > of records from m'colleague Waxie Maxie Baumgart the other > day - every Annette LP under the sun, that kind of thing. > Among the pile was an album entitled "Sam Chalpin - My > Father The Pop Singer", released on Atco 33-191 in 1966. > I see that the record was engineered by one Mike Rashkow, > for whom I guess this missive might bring back some crazy > memories... Mike Rashkow replied: > If I tell this story, no one will believe it. I will do it. > Give me a couple of days. I will tell you about Ed Chalpin. > Dirtbag. True to his word, Rashkovsky has submitted to S'pop an epistle relating to his work on the Sam Chalpin LP - all 4000 words of it! Too lengthy to print here, the article is currently in the hands of the S'pop Project Dept who are preparing it for publication on the main site in the near future. But first, we must run it past our legal advisers! Watch this space. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 11:12:43 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Bill Champlin - help I was wondering if anyone in here had, either the lyrics, or preferably an mp3 of an old song by Bill Champlin called "You" (?) It was on an early album of Bill's shortly after The Sons folded. Any help would be greatly appreciated. peace, ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 19:24:44 -0000 From: monophonius Subject: Phil's Spectre S'pop Team: > ....Clydie King's 'Missin' My Baby', Hale and the Hushabyes' > 'Yes Sir, That's My Baby', Nino Tempo's 'Boys Town' and Carol > Connors' 'My Baby Looks, But He Don't Touch'? All in pristine > sound on one friendly-priced disc? Pinch me....(David A. Young) > To read David's full review, visit the S'pop Recommends section: > http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/index2003.htm#PhilsSpectre I believe the Spector Influence is in the grooves of every pop record recorded subsequent to Phil's big year of 1963! Is my thesis a bit exaggerated? Maybe, but let's think about it. Since 1963, producers and recording artists have been incorporating Spector touches knowingly or otherwise--unless they've been living on Mars! Let's face it, the Great Man's Shadow hangs over all recording studio efforts to this day. Even if an artist doesn't want to sound anything like a Phil Spector record or use any of its techniques, that in itself is an influence--consciously trying not to sound like Phil Spector! Original ideas are always hard to come by in this world. When there's all this Spector stuff in the collective conscience it's hard not to try to use it and adapt it and mold it into something new. But, to any experienced listener, Spector's ideas, even when altered, can still be heard. It's like Jay Leno or David Letterman doing the Tonight show format and trying not to be influenced by the legacy of Johnny Carson. Many participants of this Board have been involved with recording sessions: producers, arrangers, engineers, musicians, et al. How many of you can honestly say you began recording music with no thought of Phil Spector? No thought of his great success, his style, the instrumentation, his way of layering sounds and building momentum, the hooks, the overall feeling and texture? After you had the basic tracks on tape, didn't you want to add a little something? Maybe a little more echo or a little less echo? Do it right, Phil is watching and listening. The track list for the Phil's Spectre CD is a knockout. Here's a list of twenty-five other tracks that could fill another CD. Many of these were big hits, too. Everyone of them exhibit some phase of the Spector approach. All I Really Want To Do--CHER Born To Run--BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN Dance (While The Music Still Goes On)--ABBA Dead Man's Curve--JAN & DEAN Dreaming--BLONDIE Eyes Of a New York Woman--B.J. THOMAS Girls In Love--GARY LEWIS & THE PLAYBOYS My Good Friend--PARIS SISTERS I Could Be So Good For You--DON & THE GOODTIMES The Boxer--SIMON & GARFUNKLE It's The Little Things--SONNY & CHER Make Me Your Baby--BARBARA LEWIS One Fine Day--CHIFFONS Photograph--RINGO STARR Rag Doll--FOUR SEASONS See My Baby Jive--WIZZARD I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day--WIZZARD She Is Still A Mystery--LOVIN' SPOONFUL Sloop John B--BEACH BOYS Stay Awhile--DUSTY SPRINGFIELD Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore--WALKER BROTHERS What Now My Love--MITCH RYDER World Of Dreams--CAKE You Can Have Him--CAKE You Really Know How To Hurt A Guy--JAN & DEAN -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 12:02:45 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Chicago / Manhattan Transfer Phil Milstein wrote: > ...who can be heard applauding on the Chicago 4-LP "Live At > Carnegie Hall"' Hey Phil. I'm a big fan of those early Chicago albums. The new remastered versions are pretty darn cool too. Not a lot of added material, but good sound and nice packages. My question is: Did I miss the above mentioned "Live At Carnegie Hall" reissue, or did it not come out? I love that album. Robert Lamm may not be a jazz piano monster, but I always liked what he did as a semi-jazz piano solo intro to "Does Anybody Really Know..." (At least I think that what the song he did the solo intro to). He certainly inspired me to advance beyond piano chord-voicing like "Gonna Wait Until The Morning Comes" by Neil. From: Michael Edwards Subject: Manhattan Transfer on musica > It was certainly the best thing that the Manhattan Transfer did and > it is now playing on musica. One of the things I think this group "stands for," is the appreciation of, and "standing-up," for things an individual person may appreciate that aren't necessarily appreciated by others. (Does that make sense, or have I had too much coffee?) Sometimes a person, or critic will write or say that a group like the Manhattan Transfer are of no musical significance to anyone... and other people will believe it without listening to said group, or person themselves. It seems to me that the masses prefer predigested information, rather than having to go out and make themselves a nice meal. So... before it becomes universally acknowledged that the Transfer were a bunch of hacks, I felt I sorta needed to say how much I like the Manhattan Transfer. They were doing older jazz standards on light jazz FM stations, and on network TV before that style of remaking classics became hip and groovy. I loved their TV show. It was a great mixture of, and appreciation for, musical times-gone-by. And more than that, it introduced me to musical greats of yesteryear that I certainly would never have heard on the Clear Channel conglomerate owned stations. I have them to thank for introducing me to a superabundance of musical sounds that inspire me even now. Personally, I like to cook. ...and certainly no offense to Mike. The musical noodle formally known as the boisterous loud-mouth for the "little guy," ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 06 Nov 2003 06:36:01 +1030 From: Norman Subject: It's My Party and I'm Gay if I want to.. Hi Spectropoppers, I have always admired Joan Baez for not changing the gender of songs when she covers them. regards, Norman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 20:59:35 -0000 From: Stefan Wriedt Subject: Faux Shangs Just in case nobody has mentioned these before as fine Shangri- Las sound-a-likes, I'd like to add: Nightmare - Lori Burton - from Mercury LP SR-61136 Don't Drag No More - Susan Lynne - Capitol 5201 - 1964 If there's interest, I will pay these to musica Best, Steve Moderator's note: "Nightmare" is available on "Growin' Up Too Fast" - a superlative 2-CD girl-group compilation on Mercury 314 528 171-2, annotated by our own Stuffed Animal. Lori is billed as the Whyte Boots, under which group name the track was issued as a 45. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 13:30:31 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Questions 25 or 6 to 4 Dan Hughes wrote: > ..."25 or 6 to 4" . . . "Does Anybody Really Know What > Time It Is?". Anybody know? I don't think those two songs were related, but... I remember Robert Lamm saying something in an interview somewhere, about him asking someone what time it was while he was writing the tune, and that "25 or 6 to 4" was the response he heard... and he figured it would make a good title for a song. The memory is pretty dim though. And while we're at it... what about questions 1 through 66? ~albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 17:18:39 EST From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Bobster's Turn to Omit! ! ! I knew I forgot one song of Lesley Gore's that was a big hit - "Judy's Turn To Cry" (thanks, Phil M!) made it to Number 5 on Billboard, late summer, 1963 - the danceable record in which Ms. G reassures us all that things are definitely looking better since her birthday crying jag. Phil's Spectre has lots of wonderful records on it indeed! A while back I posted about the Arlen label in L.A. that the Dartells originally recorded on, that got bought by Dot, but now that I have the Tams' wonderful "Untie Me" (G+ copy, the only one Beverly Records had) I realize that there was another Arlen label out of Philadelphia! I assume these weren't connected in any way, shape, or form? Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 23:14:02 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Re: Phil's Spectre Good to see the latest S'pop recommends on "Phil's Spectre" by David Young and "Jackie" by Peter Lerner, but for now at least my attention is still gripped by the former. David's writing summed up the very favourable reviews on the site, the messages have all seemed positive including the most recent from Alfie and Monophonius - who pleased me by including three confirmed Nitzsche arrangements and possibly five if you count the Cake tracks on his 'fantasy' collection compared with the four on "Phil's Spectre". But the 'review' that has brought the biggest smile is from... Orion, who noted: > I have tried to find a good copy of Nino Tempo's "Boys Town" > for a long time. It is IMHO one of his better pieces How delicately understated, are you perchance an Englishman?! I'd have described the track as the dogs b******s! Great to see the scan of the original, 'Daddy Sam Records' label in the CD booklet rather than the 'common' Tower re-release. Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 17:05:46 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: CTA / This 'n' That / Phil vs. Bo Alan Gordon wrote: > Hey Phil. I'm a big fan of those early Chicago albums. The > new remastered versions are pretty darn cool too. Not a lot > of added material, but good sound and nice packages. My > question is: Did I miss the above mentioned "Live At Carnegie > Hall" reissue, or did it not come out? I'm afraid I don't know. I remember signing on to a mailing list at the door to Carnegie Hall that night, but after a few address changes, I imagine their postcard announcing the CD release never quite reached me. Hardy-har, just kidding. What I genuinely do remember, though, is trading my Chicago/Carnegie boxed set straight-up for a copy of Blondie's first album the day that one came out. While I've got you here, Alan, I hope you and THAT Alan Gordon will not object to a friendly suggestion, which, if adopted, will help us all distinguish the two of you at a glance and without having to remember which one is THIS and which one THAT. Plus, it's a simple one: would you mind signing your posts to S'pop with your respective middle initials included in your names? (That is, presuming your M.I.'s is where your names start to separate from each other's!) monophonius wrote: > I believe the Spector Influence is in the grooves of every pop > record recorded subsequent to Phil's big year of 1963! Is my > thesis a bit exaggerated? Maybe, but let's think about it. A valid point, and one that reminds me a bit of my own theory of rock 'n' roll evolution, which reads: "Everything prior to Bo Diddley was leading up to him; everything since Bo Diddley has been in response to him." I believe so deeply in this formulation that one could sit across a table from me and dispute it from now until kingdom come, and I'd just sit quietly, listen patiently, and when done reply simply, "You're wrong." Not to take anything away from Phil Spector or anyone else, but in my world, Bo rules the heavens and the earth. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Wed, 05 Nov 2003 19:42:00 -0600 From: Orion Subject: Re: Phil's Spectre / Boys Town I wrote: > I have tried to find a good copy of Nino Tempo's "Boys Town" > for a long time. It is IMHO one of his better pieces. Martin Replied: > How delicately understated, are you perchance an Englishman?! > I'd have described the track as the dogs b******s! Great to see > the scan of the original, 'Daddy Sam Records' label in the CD > booklet rather than the 'common' Tower re-release. I am from Nebraska, home of Boys Town. Of course, this is just where I live for now. I have lived most of my life in Missouri. Peace and if you have a good copy of "Boys Town", send it my way. :) Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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