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Spectropop - Digest Number 1063



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Jack Nitzsche Update
           From: Martin Roberts 
      2. Re: Randy Newman
           From: Dave Heasman 
      3. Re: Melancholy Music Man
           From: James Botticelli 
      4. Re: Randy Newman / Alan Gordon
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      5. Re: Pruning electrically
           From: Preston Ritter 
      6. Re: That Alan Gordon
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      7. Re: Whatever Happened To Happy
           From: Ken Silverwood 
      8. Re: Melancholy Music Man
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      9. Re: THAT Alan Gordon, Preston Ritter, Playboy Records, "You Can Count on Me"
           From: Mark 
     10. Two Famous Alan Gordons?
           From: Mark Frumento 
     11. Re: The Hudson Brothers
           From: Rat Pfink 
     12. Re: grrr
           From: That Alan Gordon 
     13. Re: Multiples
           From: Mark Frumento 
     14. Re: Instrumentals with lyrics
           From: jerophonic 
     15. Wall of Soundalikes/Mike Smith update/Tim Gilbert
           From: Clark Besch 
     16. Re: Who Was Lois Fletcher?
           From: Phil Milstein 
     17. Re:  Canadian Rogues
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     18. Re: Instrumental Toons
           From: jerophonic 
     19. Re: Instrumentals with lyrics / Walk Don't Run
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     20. Re: Happy Together / the two Mr. Gordons
           From: Richard Havers 
     21. Those other Prunes
           From: Andrew Jones 
     22. Re: What is this song? (SOLVED!)
           From: Tom 
     23. Re: Instrumental hits
           From: John Rausch 
     24. Re: The Hudson Brothers
           From: JJ 
     25. Yet another query for That Alan Gordon
           From: Deena J Canale 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 22:33:59 +0100 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche Update It's been a while coming, but with thanks to the S'pop Admin Team, the new Record Of The Week at Jack Nitzsche At S'pop is the Cinders with "The Cinnamon Cinder (It's A Very Nice Dance)" on Warner Brothers, is now playing on the home page: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm Next week, the choice is between Billy Daniels' "That Old Black Magic" (Liberty) or Bobby Day's "Pretty Little Girl Next Door" (RCA). Jingle #3, "The Wall Of Sound" mix, is now playing at On The Radio: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/radio.htm Al Hazan's Early Days page is not big enough to hold all the records that Al Hazan and Jack Nitzsche have worked on. So, I'm very pleased to announce a new page, Al Hazan And Jack Nitzsche's Record Of The Week: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/ahjnrotw.htm The format of the page is as before with Al Hazan adding comments to a record. Instructions given on how to listen to it on Al's own site. This week is one of my favourites, Yolanda and the Charmanes' "Hootchy Cootchy Girl" (Smash). Enjoy! Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 23:43:00 +0100 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Re: Randy Newman Harvey: > A couple of examples I can think of are Linda Ronstadts cover of > "Sail Away" in which she chages the line "Climb aboard, little > wog..." to the somewhat less "offensive" (ie accurate) "Climb aboard, > little one..". Ray Charles did that, too, probably first.. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 19:56:45 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Melancholy Music Man That Alan Gordon: > I was in a group called the Magicians. Is that the same Magicians that did "Invitation To Cry"? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 16:36:24 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Randy Newman / Alan Gordon Harvey wanted to know if "She Knows" was covered by any artists other than Bobby Darin. The answer is no, I hope one day it will be used in a movie soundtack. Just a side note - When Bobby was recording the song, on the instrumental break I pleaded with him to throw in a few "hey hey heys" He said he'd done that already and resisted - I implored him: "C'mon Bobby you gotta do it". He gave in and now everytime I listen to it I have to smile, 'cause he did it for me. If I'm not mistaken, Don Peake did the charts. Best That Alan Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 00:24:39 -0000 From: Preston Ritter Subject: Re: Pruning electrically Steve Harvey wrote: > How did you like the piece on the Prunes that Mojo recently > did? And what's the story on the live tape from Sweden? > Who recorded it? Hi Steve, I liked the MOJO article except for one thing. None of the photos they used had me in them! The pics they used had a drummer and rhythm guitar player that wasn't on any of our hit records. Don't know how that happened. I was already out of the band for a few months by the time the Prunes went to Sweden and did that show that became the recording. So I really can't speak to that with any authority, since I don't know much about it. I think it was originally a bootleg recording from a radio station, or so I heard. After that, I can't say. Look at http://www.spectropop.com/htoc2.html#new the "New at Spectropop" section, for a good interview with Annette Tucker, who wrote our two biggest hits, "I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night" and "Get Me To The World On Time", as well as other songs on our first LP. Annette and I are teaming up again with a new band I'm forming now. I hope good things come of it. Preston -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 17:01:42 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: That Alan Gordon Clark, you are right. We are playing "Happy Together" on the Turtles' video. We did that at the N.Y. Jets' training camp at Hofstra. Jim Pons, former member of the Turtles, handles the videos for the Jets and he produced that shoot at Hofstra. Thanks for the kind words. Best. That Alan Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 00:13:43 +0100 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Whatever Happened To Happy Michel Gignac: > "Whatever Happened To Happy" was also recorded by Mojo (aka Mojo > Men). This is my favorite Mojos' track. Didn't the Mojo Men also do "Me About You" as well? Ken On The West Coast. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 17:10:32 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Melancholy Music Man Peter wanted to know if the Righteous Brothers session was a one-off deal. I think that is correct.I`d have to check with Joe Wissert or Don Rubin, they would know better than I. Take Care Best That Alan Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 00:05:27 GMT From: Mark Subject: Re: THAT Alan Gordon, Preston Ritter, Playboy Records, "You Can Count on Me" Hey Guys! Apologies for not having posted in a couple of weeks. I recently went through a bout of gastritis during which I could barely eat or drink. When this is going on, I don't have much interest in anything except getting well--have went through this several times in the past. I'm feeling much better now. Welcome to Alan Gordon! I have only heard "Invitation to Cry" (through its inclusion on the original "Nuggets" double LP), but it's quite a tune and I'd like to hear more Magicians tracks! The Turtles' version of "Happy Together" is the best by far, but lately I've been getting a kick out of two campy, loungy versions: one by Vikki Carr on a Hip-O CD I picked up not too long ago, "Fun and Lounging in Las Vegas", and another by none other than Frank Sinatra, Jr., on a Dora Hall LP that's lying around my house somewhere. Also a big welcome to Preston Ritter: I also think your drum work on "I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" kicks a##! Re Playboy Records: I have the Stak-O-Wax discog here in front of me. Here are some other famous folks who've cut sides for the label: Pat Upton (Spiral Starecase lead vocalist), Tim Rose, Bobby Scott, Willie Henderson (arranger on a lot of great Chicago soul records), Joey Scarbury (of "Greatest American Hero" fame), The Newbeats, Major Lance, Wynn Stewart, Brenda Lee Eager (one- time duet partner of Jerry Butler), Denny Doherty, Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods, and two interesting yet minor country performers: Sunday Sharpe and Little David Wilkins. I don't remember who wanted to hear "You Can Count on Me" by Sammy Davis Jr., but there is an RA of it (and countless other Northern soul tracks) on this site: http://the.soulclub.org It's under "S" for Sammy. "I Think It's Going to Rain Today": it's not the original version, but I do have a version of it by none other than that great vocalist Leonard Nimoy! Best, Mark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 01:39:25 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Two Famous Alan Gordons? I wrote: >I don't know if I'll be so accomodating when the more > famous Mark Frumento shows up. The Also Famous, Other Alan Gordon wrote: > "More famous???!!!" Whyyyy, I oughta... > (Obviously you're not a comic fan, pally) Err, ah.... I meant to say.... "the more musically famous" Alan, are you the same Alan Gordon who did the Thirteenth Night? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 21:49:19 -0700 From: Rat Pfink Subject: Re: The Hudson Brothers Scott Charbonneau wrote: > A couple of their tunes, Rendezvous and So You Are A Star, did > receive a fair amount of airplay in the mid 1970s. Been a long > time since I've heard either of them but I remember them as > being well crafted pop with a very strong Beatles influence. "So You Are A Star" was definitely Beatles/Badfinger style pop, however "Rendezvous" was more of a Beach Boys pastiche. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 17:15:31 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: grrr Albabe. We all know it takes a real HERO to create a super hero! So There!!! Best nala nodrog -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 02:17:40 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Multiples James Botticelli wrote: > I heard the two Alans are taking on the four Arties at a party. That's good because Mark Wirtz, me and a bunch of the other Marks aren't up for it. That Mark Frumento -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 02:39:09 -0000 From: jerophonic Subject: Re: Instrumentals with lyrics Ken Silverwood wrote: > Which then made me think how many other instrumentals were later > given lyrics. Just two off the top of my head: The Drifters' > "Stranger On The Shore" and Bobby Rydell's "Telstar" or "Magic Star". > Any others? The Dovells put lyrics to Phil Upchurch's 1961 jazz/soul instrumental "You Can't Sit Down Part 2" and reached No. 3 pop in 1963. Hugh Masekela's jazz instrumental "Grazing in the Grass" hit No. 1 pop in 1968, and the underrated Friends of Distinction's radical vocal rearrangement reached No. 3 a year later. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 02:56:28 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Wall of Soundalikes/Mike Smith update/Tim Gilbert Hi, sorry for the multi-posts lately. Just wanted to thank Mick Patrick for allowing me to help out a bit on your fantastic Ace "Wall of Soundalikes" CD! Some cool stuff I'd not heard previously! I know Jimmy Holvay will be very pleased to have a song of his on such a terrific package! I certainly feel his "He Will Break Your Heart" is the closest thing to the Righteous Brothers anyone could get in 1966 including that cool song by the Wall of Sound which also graces the package. "Missin' my Baby" is great! The Nino/April track is a masterpiece. Helping with their Varese CD was fun and Cary Mansfield included the mono 45 version (Phil S. asked us to --just kidding) on the "Best of White Whale" Cd for a little variation. Thanks again, Mick! Can't remember if it was posted about DC5 lead singer, Mike Smith, last month or not here. He was injured in a very serious fall in his home in Spain. In late September, he had surgery to repair 3 broken verabrae in his neck. The operation was successful, but a new note today on his website states that he is still in intensive care because of a high fever and difficulties breathing. They are hoping to stablize him and move him to a rehab hospital as soon as possible. Certainly all of Spectropop wishes him the best I'm sure. I still love listening to the DC5 music and have always called their songs "the most powerful 2 minutes in rock". I recently was watching the Phil Spector show "Live at PJ's" with Phil hosting an all DC5 show. What a great moment in video 60's music! Get well soon, Mike-- you already have dates lined up for next year and we want to hear that snarling voice! On the Tim Gilbert front, Gear Fab Records has just released on CD, a 1969 LP of songs all written by Carter-Gilbert on White Whale Records originally by a group called The Horses. Apparently, the group featured a young Don Johnson (Miami Vice). I have not heard this. Anygood??? A special shout back at cha, MopTop Mike! Good to have you here! Hope you enjoy your stay in pop-mania! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 21:19:47 -0400 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Who Was Lois Fletcher? Clark Besch wrote: > Thanks, Bobster! I believe they were based outta Colorado? > A less popular version of New Christy Minstrels? I found this phrasing on a merchant website that had a CD entitled "The Best Of The Back Porch Majority" available: "Formed by Randy Sparks, founder and leader of the New Christy Minstrels, as a "farm team" for the NCMs, the Back Porch Majority sent several of their membership to the NCMs, but also established a pretty good following of their own. This 26 song collection is culled from the 5 albums the group recorded during the sixties."` --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 22:32:34 -0400 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Canadian Rogues Michael Gessner: > Does anyone remember a Florida 60s group called the Canadian > Rogues? I found one of their songs on a compilation but was > wondering if they released any 45s or LPs. The Canadian Rogues were a Lakeland, Florida band that released five 45s between the years 1965 and 1967. One of their singles was released on both Charay (out of Texas) and Palmer (out of Michigan), even though they were from neither state. Their charismatic lead singer, Willie Metts, is no longer with us, but a couple of the band members are still playing in Florida, in a band now simply known as "The Rogues". Jeff Lemlich just back from game 5 of the National League Championship Series -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 03:15:18 -0000 From: jerophonic Subject: Re: Instrumental Toons Phil Milstein wrote: > Here is the list so far. Glad to see Booker T & MGs well-represented on your list; be sure to add one of their nastiest, "Boot-Leg", with the proto-fuzz guitar. We used to sit around and argue which was the first "heavy metal" record. "Hush"? "You Really Got Me"? "Boot-Leg"? "She's a Woman"? Something by Link Wray or Mitch Ryder? The entire Muddy Waters catalogue? It's one of those great unresolvable discussions. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 22:26:12 -0400 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Instrumentals with lyrics / Walk Don't Run Tom Taber wrote: > I've wondered if "Walk, Don't Run" ever had lyrics - > if not, here goes: > Walk, don't you run, better walk don't you run now; > Walk, don't you run - Better walk, don't you run now. > Walk and don't run - better walk, don't run, don't run, > don't ru-u-u-n!" > Now perhaps you all will be cursed with having to sing > along as I have since these came to me a few years back. That's as bad as the one I'm forever cursed to sing along with: "Well sometimes I drink tequila, and sometimes I drink alone. Well sometimes I drink tequila, and sometimes I drink alone. (chorus) We drink te-qui-la. We drink te-qu-ila. We drink te-qu-ila. Ev-ery night and day. TEQUILA! Jeff Lemlich who doesn't really drink tequila -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 07:39:18 +0100 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Happy Together / the two Mr. Gordons Phil Milstein wrote: > With all due respect to all the Alans and Marks involved, I suspect > that what Mark F. meant was "more famous than me", not more famous > than Alan Gordon. Which is exactly why I wrote...."the more famous, impossible!" a few days ago. Mark F. No.1 you'll always be the most famous Mark F. to me. Best Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 00:25:00 -0400 (EDT) From: Andrew Jones Subject: Those other Prunes Preston Ritter: First of all, a belated welcome to S'pop. Secondly, can you shed some light on one of my favorite rock-music mysteries? For some reason, after recording two albums, the original Electric Prunes - your group - disappeared, and a completely different group, with different members and a different sound, took over the name and the Reprise contract. Were you involved in any this? Outside of the Drifters, I've never heard of such a thing happening. Thanks! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 05:25:28 -0000 From: Tom Subject: Re: What is this song? (SOLVED!) Orion: > The song you are talking about is "As They All Fall" by Orpheus. That's it! Just listened to an online sound sample and that is definitely the song. The television commercial version is of course abbreviated and repeats the chorus until the end. Looks like I got to track down the import version of their CD to get it. It certainly is a snazzy little pop tune. I wonder if it ever charted. Thanks. Tom -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sun, 12 Oct 2003 06:13:36 -0500 From: John Rausch Subject: Re: Instrumental hits Phil Milstein: > Any thoughts on which is the definitive instrumental > version of "Night Train"? Sammy Kaye and his orchestra have a killer version of Night Train, cicra 1965 on Decca. This is the version I grew up on. If the Munsters had a third season, this could easily have been the opening theme. That's how cool Sammy Kaye's version is. John Rausch -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 09:15:27 -0000 From: JJ Subject: Re: The Hudson Brothers Scott Charbonneau wrote: > A couple of their tunes, Rendezvous and So You Are A Star, did > receive a fair amount of airplay in the mid 1970s. Been a long time > since I've heard either of them but I remember them as being well > crafted pop with a very strong Beatles influence. During the mid to > late 60s they recorded several singles as the New Yorkers, with one > classic track in Mr. Kirby which has appeared on a few collections > of obscure garage/psych material. **"The Land of Ur" by the New Yorkers, is incl on the NEW(out next week!) Fading Yellow vol 6 cd comp....."The Land.." = a FAB slice of Pop-sike! MORE pop than psych! JJ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 08:26:25 -0400 From: Deena J Canale Subject: Yet another query for That Alan Gordon Hi there Alan, I know a lot of people have been bombarding you with questions and I'm sorry to add to the barrage, but if you don't mind my asking...could you elaborate a little on your impressions of NYC's rock & roll scene in the '60s? I.e., what clubs did the Magicians play and/or hang out at, what were the scenes like (including Steve Paul's Scene if applicable), what bands did you fraternize with, that sort of thing. The liner notes to the Magicians' Sundazed comp are tasty indeed but if you've anything more to add I'd be truly appreciative. Inquiring NYC expats want to know! Signed D.C. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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