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Spectropop - Digest Number 1057



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Gold Star and other L.A. studios
           From: Bill Reed 
      2. Re: Happy Together
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      3. Re: Bobby Vee / Double Good Feeling
           From: That Alan Gordon 
      4. Re: Gold Star Recording Studios location
           From: Mick Patrick 
      5. Re: Randy's Miraculous Marie
           From: (not That) Alan Gordon 
      6. the Debutantes
           From: Bill 
      7. Re: Orbisonesque
           From: Phil Milstein 
      8. Re: Double Good Feeling
           From: Mikey 
      9. Jerry Mathers Record
           From: James Botticelli 
     10. Re: More Cookies
           From: James Botticelli 
     11. Re: Lindsey Buckingham
           From: Geoff Kaiser 
     12. Re: The Cat in the Window
           From: Dave Feldman 
     13. Re: Lindsay Buckingham
           From: Eddy 
     14. Re: Peter Lacey
           From: Stratton Bearhart 
     15. Two Alan Gordons: Happy Together
           From: Mark Frumento 
     16. Re: Professor Longhair
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     17. Re: Randy Newman
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     18. Re: The Settlers and Tony Hatch
           From: Mick Patrick 
     19. Re: That Alan Gordon / Small Talk
           From: Bill Reed 
     20. Re: Radio Recorders
           From: Bill Reed 
     21. Re: Happy Together
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     22. Re: That Alan Gordon / Happy Together
           From: Martin Jensen 
     23. Pruning electrically
           From: Steve Harvey 
     24. Re: THAT Alan Gordon / Small Talk
           From: Jim Allio 
     25. Re: Accomodation
           From: Richard Havers 


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Message: 1 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 00:56:51 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: Re: Gold Star and other L.A. studios > Q..Where was Gold Star located? > A. In the heart of Hollywood near the intersection of Vine > Street and Santa Monica Boulevard. Gold Star was located at the Southeast corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Vine (if you wanna get reallll technical, at just the point where Vine turns into Rossmore). It was still there when I noved to L.A. in the 70s. There is a strip mall there now, which includes a Radio Shack franchise. There are several other great old studios still remaining. The C.P. MacGregor studios at 729 S. Western Avenue is now Stevie Wonder's private studio. Most of the jazz label Dial was cut there, along with early Nat King Cole. There are probably more; I have a friend whose hobby is the history of such places. I will try to pick his brain and post the results here. When I produced my first jazz album last year for singer Pinky Winters, we did it at Radio Recorders, now known as Studio 56. I couldn't resist, especially because of the killer 8 foot Yamaha piano. Arguably the most distinguished studio of all time. I could barely concentrate on my work what with touching everything. Palpable history! Most of Presley's non-soundtrack West Coast recordings were done there. Most all of Capitol before they built the Tower, and continuing on to some extent after that. And everyone from Stravinsky to most of the Ella Fitzgerald Songbooks. Most of the Verve label, in fact. Name a famous Coast recording of any idiom, going back to the early forties or maybe earlier, and there's a better than 50-50 chance it was cut there. It also functioned as a radio studio for the networks. Allegedly Elvis wrote his name in cement out front. The current owner showed me. I feel, most emphatically, that it should be protected as a national historic landmark. Kind of fon-kay and rundown now, but it was still enough for Phil Spector when he tried to record an album with Celine Dion a few years back. Pretty chaotic late night scene, I am led to believe. First, the a.c. went on the fritz. An augury. Then the music copyist messed up pretty badly. The final results were deemed unreleasable. Just as well. Celine Dion? Ummmm. . .I don't THINK so. But I digress as is my wont. . .. Bill Reed http://www.cllrdr.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2003 17:58:32 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Happy Together Tom, thank you so much for saying those nice things. You are absolutely correct, Happy Together is a song about someone who is very much in love, but can only Imagine. The tag at the fade undescores that sentiment with the words, "so how is the weather". Can anyone blame me for being so fond of S`pop, All you wonderful people that remember these songs, after all, they were written in hopes of standing the test of time. I keep waiting for that one cat in Japan to tell me how much he likes "Hey put the clock back on the wall" but that`s what`s so great about S`pop. Thanks again Tom. Best That Alan Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2003 18:19:55 -0700 (MST) From: That Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Bobby Vee / Double Good Feeling Bob, I`am a big fan of Bobby Vee. Sorry to say I never heard his version of "Double Good Feeling" and only a few years ago somebody gave me a copy of his version of a song we wrote called "Tiffany Rings". I am hoping one day someone will do "Double good feeling", if only to get a doublemint gum commercial!!! Warmest Wishes That Alan Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 02:36:25 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Gold Star Recording Studios location Keith Nivan wrote: > One thing I've always wondered is where *specifically* (Gold Star) > studio was located. Does anybody know? I have just posted a picture of a Gold Star pen to the photos section: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/photos/ The pen was given to me by Charlotte O'Hara's friend Peter Canvel. I kinda treasure it. On it is printed the following vital information: Gold Star Recording Studios, Inc. 6252 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood, California 90038 HO 9-1173 HO 7-5131 Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2003 18:40:25 -0700 From: (not That) Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Randy's Miraculous Marie From: Country Paul Subject: Randy Newman: > For example, in all the times I've heard "Marie" on record, there > hasn't been one where my eyes have been dry at the end. I guess the thing that absolutely amazes me here, is Randy's ability to write a staggeringly "connecting" love song, sung in the character of a simple, pathetic, wife-beating, red-neck, that makes almost anyone who listens to it, tear up with either plumbless sadness or resolute sympathy.... and probably a few other nouns. In the context of that amazing album, Marie is sung, arguably, by a real self-centered ass. But when it's heard out of context, it's sung by an everyman of sorts. Not by your everyday "everyman" that frequents the Arts, TV, Movies and Literature as the commonplace but natural "hero of a thousand faces..." but by the "everyman" most men would never want to admit they've actually been (hopefully, sans the wife-beating part). I get choke-swollen just writing about it. You looked like a princess the night we met With your hair piled up high I will never forget I'm drunk right now baby But I've got to be Or I never could tell you What you meant to me I loved you the first time I saw you And I always will love you Marie I loved you the first time I saw you And I always will love you Marie You're the song that the trees sing when the wind blows You're a flower you're a river you're a rainbow Sometimes I'm crazy But I guess you know And I'm weak and I'm lazy And I've hurt you so And I don't listen to a word you say When you're in trouble I just turn away I loved you the first time I saw you And I always will love you Marie I loved you the first time I saw you And I always will love you Marie dow I godda blow by dose... ~owbabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2003 19:20:48 -0700 (PDT) From: Bill Subject: the Debutantes Hello Does anyone have any info on a girl group called "The Debutantes" who recorded on the Lucky Eleven label (1967) out of the Flint Mi. area. They were a four member group. I believe they also recorded on the Gail & Rice label and the Standout label. Would like to know if they were from the Flint area of Mi. or not and if those other two labels were from that area as well? Anything on this subject would be helpful Thank You ===== The Vinyl Spinner 3345 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 00:49:28 -0400 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Orbisonesque Rob wrote: > Incidently Phil is there any movement on the Roy Orbison soundalikes > project? Funny you should ask -- I'm running off yet another demo version right now. This one is to make the final inclusion list; after that comes sequencing. It's been a fun project -- even the rejects are quite good. Thanks for the instro tips, --Phil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 01:18:10 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Double Good Feeling Bob: > (That Alan Gordon) wrote the song "Double Good Feeling" that appeared on > Bobby Vee's late sixties lp, "Come Back When You Grow Up". Gary Lewis recorded this also. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 01:45:04 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Jerry Mathers Record My sweetie gave me a 45 of Jerry Mathers' 1963 Atlantic single "Don Cha Cry" b/w "Wind Up Toy" for my birthday Friday. I'd been looking for it for nearly 40 years! She, needless to say, has scored major points for digging it up. Was there an album with that rekkid? Anyone? James Botticelli -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 01:47:13 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: More Cookies Mike Edwards recommended the Cookies': > "Softly In The Night" Best thing the Cookies did IMHO...I need that rekkid again, somebody stole my last copy.. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 01:26:29 -0500 From: Geoff Kaiser Subject: Re: Lindsey Buckingham Bill George: > I've been searching for a song for a long time. It's by Lindsay > Buckingham and I think its called "Holiday Road." It was used in the > National Lampoon Vacation movies. Was there a soundtrack? Hi Bill... don't know if anyone has answered you yet... but Holiday Road did come out on a promo CD; if you haven't already been able to get it from someone, let me know (off list). regards, Geoff P.S. I don't know if it ever was on 45, but I think it was released on LP for the Vacation soundtrack... but I can't confirm... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 03:16:17 -0400 From: Dave Feldman Subject: Re: The Cat in the Window That Alan Gordon wrote about one of my favorite songs: > Thank You for the kind words. The song was inspired by the visits I > had with my ageing grandmother. As I would leave her home she would > be standing at her window and waving to me. Pet Clark did that song > and "Fancy Dancin Man". Garry and I met with her at her home in > Hollywood. She was working at the time on the film Goodbye Mr. Chips. > The people responsible for the project were Koppelman and Rubin. They > were a crucial part of our success in those days. Thanks for sharing all of this, Alan. > Did You notice how short the record is - under 2 minutes. She is a > lovely lady, a great singerand to top it off she did the song on the > Ed Sullivan show!!! Notice?! I was a disc jockey all four years in college and played "Cat in the Window" often -- no bathroom breaks were taken during CITW! I've often wondered if the rather abrupt ending of the song, with the heartbreaking "Don't even try to," made it difficult for DJ's to segue into their next cut. I also think the lack of a chorus is highly effective -- the whole song (and the wonderful production) makes us feel uneasy, not unlike the homebound cat. Thanks again -- it's such a pleasure to have you here. This Dave Feldman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 09:20:29 +0200 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Lindsay Buckingham Bill George: > I've been searching for a song for a long time. It's by Lindsay > Buckingham and I think its called "Holiday Road." It was used in the > National Lampoon Vacation movies. Was there a soundtrack? As you correctly stated, Holiday Road is featured in the National Lampoon's Vacation movie. As such it is also the first track on the soundtrack album. Although I can't seem to find any evidence of a cd release, the song has been released here and there as the A-side of a Lindsey Buckingham solo 45. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 07:36:08 -0000 From: Stratton Bearhart Subject: Re: Peter Lacey Chris Allen wrote: > There's an article up at the new October Ear Candy magazine > in praise of the singer/songwriter Peter Lacey.... I had the pleasure of interviewing Peter Lacey for EC back in 2000 at the time of his debut album release "Beam!". Here's the URL:- http://earcandy_mag.tripod.com/lacey2.htm As Chris Allen says there are many artists following the path to Wilsonia, and in my humble view many of them end up sounding more like Brian and The Beach Boys than B&TBB. For my money in different ways Lacey and The Llamas push the envolope into the millenium with aplomb. Stratton. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 13:12:51 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Two Alan Gordons: Happy Together That Alan Gordon: > I keep waiting for that one cat in Japan to tell me how much he > likes "Hey put the clock back on the wall" but that`s what`s so > great about S`pop. Ok... I love that song and I'm not even in Japan... New Jersey will have to do. :>)) Actually one of the songs I've found still enticing after all these years is "Tiffany Rings". It's so short and perfectly timed that it's length makes it a mini-masterpiece. Did anyone else cover that song? By the way I think it's great how the two Alan Gordons made room for each other. I don't know if I'll be so accomodating when the more famous Mark Frumento show's up. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 09:53:42 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Professor Longhair T D Bell writes: > When Professor Longhair (Roy Byrd) died, Doctor John was quoted in > the obituary as saying, "Everybody learned from 'Fess--Fats Domino, > Allan Tousaint, Huey Smith--all of 'em learned from 'Fess." There is a film documentary named Piano Players Rarely Ever Play Together. Much on Fess in there--all positive as well. Toussaint basically worshipped him. By the way, check your old titles for the composer Naomi Neville. That's Allen using his mother's maiden name-- a Neville naturally. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 09:56:55 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Randy Newman R.N., I dare not speak the name, should not be dissected--he should be deified. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 15:00:14 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: The Settlers and Tony Hatch Norman on the Settlers: > A real treat on the LP is the song "A Woman Called Freedom" > written by Tony Hatch and Phil Coulter (you can imagine the > result of such a collaboration). Not quite correct. The Settlers' "A Woman Called Freedom", an anti war song, was written by Tony Hatch and Brenda Coulter, not Phil Coulter. The song is included on the recent double CD "Call Me: The Songs Of Tony Hatch". Mike Edwards reviewed this release for the S'pop Recommends section back in June. Read it here: http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/index.htm#TonyHatch A quote from Kieron Tyler's excellent sleevenotes: "The song was written with a Brenda Coulter", recalls Tony. "It was the winning lyric in a women's magazine competition and the agreement was that I should set it to music and record it with one of the Pye acts". I asked Tony Hatch about the Settlers a few months ago. He replied: "The Settlers were brought to me by Harry Hammond who also brought me the Overlanders. Harry had been a photographer for or, in a freelance capacity, supplied photographs to The New Musical Express then switched to management. Two boys and a girl (Cindy), they were an excellent folk group but perhaps a bit too close to Peter, Paul and Mary. We made some good records but none took off. I wrote at least one of them - "Major To Minor". Following their time at Pye they had a small hit with York Records - "Lightning Tree" in 1971. They backed Cliff Richard when he went on his religious tour, working with him all over Europe. I wouldn't have remembered that if I'd not seen them included in the Cliff Richard TV profile the other night". (Tony Hatch) With 60 tracks for under a tenner, the "Call Me" set is a must-have for Hatch fans. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 15:02:27 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: Re: That Alan Gordon / Small Talk Tom Taber wrote: > I'd also like to welcome Alan, and say that one of my favorites is > "Small Talk" as performed by Harpers Bizarre, which I found on a 45 > with the tell-tale cut-out hole in it - not sure if it was the A or > B side. "Sunday best and dressed to kill the afternoon..." That version AND the A&M single by Claudine Longet & Andy Williams were both arranged by Nick DeCaro. Similar "take" on this number as the Harps, but not the same backing tracks. I agree, BTW: a soft-rock classic that slipped through the cracks somehow. Bill Reed http://www.cllrdr.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 15:30:44 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: Re: Radio Recorders Radio Recorders, now known as Studio 56. . . There's a nice thumbnail history of the place at: http://www.56ent.com/history.html Bill Reed http://www.cllrdr.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 10:20:37 -0400 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Happy Together That Alan Gordon writes: > ...All you wonderful people that remember these songs, after all, > they were written in hopes of standing the test of time. ... Hello Alan, More than remembering the record and song as one of the most perfect pop creations ever, I am currently in production of a re-make of it as one of the "Star Tracks" of UK's spectacular Harmony Rock band Spyderbaby's debut CD. While contributing certain "now" elements and energies to the recording's concept in order to give it a contemporary identification, we are remaining utterly and respectfully faithful to the spirit and essence of your timeless original. With much admiration (also on behalf of Rob and Micky of Spyderbaby), Mark Wirtz -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 15:31:39 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Re: That Alan Gordon / Happy Together Hi Alan, I just want to let you know that 'Happy Together' is one of my all- time favourite tunes. An incredibly catchy song - I can definately NEVER grow tired of it. Or Howard Kaylans maginificent vocal for that matter... With regards Martin, Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 08:55:43 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Pruning electrically Welcome Preston, How did you like the piece on the Prunes that Mojo recently did? And what's the story on the live tape from Sweden? Who recorded it? Steve Harvey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 11:59:28 EDT From: Jim Allio Subject: Re: THAT Alan Gordon / Small Talk One of my favorite Gordon-Bonner songs - and there are many, they were so well-crafted and idioscyncratic, not to mention fun to sing - is "Small Talk," a real gem by Gary Lewis, Claudine Longet or, my favorite, Lesley Gore. What a great song and record that was. Jim Allio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2003 17:08:35 +0100 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Accomodation Mark Frumento wrote: > By the way I think it's great how the two Alan Gordons made room for > each other. I don't know if I'll be so accomodating when the more > famous Mark Frumento show's up. The more famous....impossible! Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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