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Spectropop - Digest Number 1048



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. More on Scorcese, Lillian Roxon
           From: Art Longmire 
      2. Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues"
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      3. Some Brill Building Trivia, Perhaps?
           From: Mac Joseph 
      4. Re: "The (?) I'm Gonna Marry"
           From: Mac Joseph 
      5. Re: Playboy Records
           From: Nick Archer 
      6. Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues"
           From: John Berg 
      7. Re: Beau Brummels
           From: Mark 
      8. Baby Jane Holzer
           From: Mark 
      9. Re: Joey Levine/Joey Edwards
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     10. CC; BB; r&r; Playboy; Sherman Edwards and more
           From: Country Paul 
     11. Re: Martin Scorsese's The Blues
           From: Richard Williams 
     12. Jim Fairs from the Cryan' Shames
           From: Martin Jensen 
     13. Rainy Daze, Gilbert, Playboy Records
           From: Clark Besch 
     14. Re: Richard Perry
           From: Artie Wayne 
     15. The Duprees - an apology
           From: Artie Wayne 
     16. Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues"
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     17. Re: Playboy Records
           From: Mikey 
     18. Re: Scorcese's Blues
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     19. Re: Baby Jane Holzer
           From: Phil Milstein 
     20. Re: Richard Perry
           From: Orion 
     21. Re: The Beau Brummels
           From: Alan Gordon 
     22. Re: Jim Fairs from the Cryan' Shames
           From: Art Longmire 
     23. Youm made me love you
           From: David A. Young 
     24. Re: Carol Kaye / Suzi Jane Hokum
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     25. Connie and the Cones (and Darlene Woods & the Starlings)
           From: Ian Slater 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 22:47:51 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: More on Scorcese, Lillian Roxon Mike's response to my original post on Martin Scorcese's PBS Blues series got me to thinking about these types of series generally- they're good, sometimes great, but I can always think of ways in which they could be better. First of all-more original footage! I can never get enough of great artists in their prime performing their music. The section on British Blues was excellent but I could have done with more original film of the people being discussed-the Rolling Stones clip they showed was exactly the same clip used in another section of the series. But there were some great moments-Skip James, Muddy Waters and the Chess story with Marshall Chess-I'm one of those who grew up hearing how awful "Electric Mud" was-yet several people whose opinions I respect have praised it! Seeing the young Booker T and the MG's was electrifying, as was Sister Rosetta Tharpe- I've heard of her but seeing her was a revelation-what a guitar player! More kids today need to be exposed to this type of music- that's all I can say. The Clint Eastwood section last night on piano blues was quite good, I thought. I also want to say thanks for the response to my post on Lillian Roxon. Her book was like a bible to me-I bought it in 1974, the year I got out of high school. At the time, I was already a keen student of 60's rock and her book was a tremendous help, since it included information on many musicians who already were being written out of the history of rock by the mid-70's. I see from the responses that she affected many other people the same way. Best, Art Longmire -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 19:25:01 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues" Richard Havers: > I think Altha is probably Otha Turner who died earlier this year. > His fife and drum band was a sight to behold, live they recreated > what it must have been like on a saturday night fish fry. Correction noted. Shines died in 1992? They never indicated that it was anything but current. Bill Reed: > Brother Ray was on the Clint Eastwood installment dealing with > piano blues that was shown Saturday night in the U.S. Charles, > in new footage, was shown playing simply great piano. Also > featured were Fats Domino, Oscar Peterson, Art Tatum, Dr. John > and others Bill, they have not yet shown that one here. I think they started a day earlier some places. Maybe I'll catch that tonight. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 16:39:27 -0700 (PDT) From: Mac Joseph Subject: Some Brill Building Trivia, Perhaps? Dear Group: I have a few questions I am curious about; hope you guys can help; #1: I have a CD "Jay and the Americans, Come a little Bit Closer", it is a compilation, greatest hits. On track #8, "Come Dance with Me", there is a girl who opens the track with "1, 02 , 01 ,2,3", who sounds so much like Carole King. Was she involved with J& the Americans, as far as producing and arranging? #2 Carole (King) used to use a guitarist by the name of Charlie Macey, I believe when she recorded Little Eva and the Cookies, I think it was at Mirasound, Brooks Arthur was the engineer there for many years. what ever became of Charlie Macey? #3 Whatever became of Earl Jean McCrae, the sultry, sexy voice behind the original "I'm into Somethin Good", shortly thereafter covered by Hermans Hermits? And I am still looking for the title to that song, the only lyrics I have being, "when I was with you girl, I made the grade, but since youv'e gone, I've had it made" , tnis must be a garage band, 1965-67 I am guessing. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks much, guys, and gals; Mac Joseph -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 16:46:22 -0700 (PDT) From: Mac Joseph Subject: Re: "The (?) I'm Gonna Marry" Andrew Jones wrote: > Y'know, I could've sworn I'd asked this before, but a search of the > S'pop message archives showed me that I didn't. So... Does anyone know > of any male singers or male groups remaking Darlene Love's "(Today I > Met) The Boy I'm Gonna Marry"? (Changing "Boy" to "Girl," obviously.) Yes! Back in the seventies, a guy by the name of Kenny...... (I think he's the same guy that had "I Like Dreamin", anyway it wasn't a remake, he had written a song called "Today I Met, The Girl I'm Gonna Marry". The last name will come to me, will post it as soon as I Identify him. Mac Joseph -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 18:33:07 -0500 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Playboy Records A great single was on Playboy, "Winners & Losers" by Hamilton, Joe Frank, & Reynolds. Have any of the Playboy cuts ever come out on CD? Nick Archer Check out Nashville's classic SM95 on the web at http://www.live365.com/stations/nikarcher -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 05 Oct 2003 20:06:53 EDT From: John Berg Subject: Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues" I watched all 7 PBS Blues shows and didn't hear any mention of Pee Wee Crayton, nor a bunch of other bluesmen (and women) -- not to fault the various directors as this just shows again how expansive the world of blues really is. Alongside Pee Wee there were a whole bunch of other west coast blues players & singers -- not to mention scenes in the gulf coast, west texas, piedmont, etc. It would truly be impossible to give a comprehensive view of the blues in just 7 films. You have blues scenes in so many diverse locales, you have various styles ranging from the "gut bucket" to the way slick, and you have players from several generations (of course many of the "greats" are gone now, but it seems that a "new generation" keeps popping up, for which we can all be thankful -- and buy their CDs or go to their gigs to keep bread on their tables!) In all the above categories you have your "premier" players, your "B team"/journeymen, and even your "marginal" players who none the less deserve some kind of a hearing. I can only give credit to PBS for showing what they did. For me the highlight was seeing the footage of J.B. Lenoir; John Mayall used to tout him but I never took the cue, now I regret not giving propers to the man a long time ago. What a sweet, sweet voice and guitar style, and what perceptive lyrics! Not too many like him have come this way. John Berg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 00:31:22 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Re: Beau Brummels If you are a fan as I am of their early sound, i.e., Laugh, Laugh, Cry Just a Little, then you might be disappointed with the later stuff. Personally I have the best of the Rhino put out and the further it goes on the disc, the less I liked it. Not saying it was bad but it wasn't my style and it certainly was not very commercial and it was far different from their earlier material. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 00:40:24 -0000 From: Mark Subject: Baby Jane Holzer Anyone know anything about her? I have an episode of a 60s rock show, maybe Hullaballoo but I'm not sure, with her doing a nice song. All I've found on vinyl is 1 45 on Atco that's pretty good. Was she a model who tried singing, ala Twiggy? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 07:42:20 +0100 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: Re: Joey Levine/Joey Edwards JC wrote: > I'm confused. Went to Tweedlee Dum and joined, and still no Joey > Edwards. Where are those tracks? Thanks, JC Like Spectropop's Musica, our musical selections at TDDI change frequently. I'll get in touch off-list and send you the tracks. Regards, Guy http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TweedleeDumsDrive-In/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 01:43:34 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: CC; BB; r&r; Playboy; Sherman Edwards and more Previously: > Does anybody out there knows who recorded the first version of > Randy Newman's "I Think It's Going To Rain Today"?" I believe it may have been Judy Collins. Phil & Mikey: > Collectors Choice is a very curious yet a very VITAL label. > ....CC puts out stuff that no one else will, and that by itself > is enough reason to keep them in bizness. In my ldealings with them, they have been reliable and reasonably quick in their delivery. And the diversity of their catalog is noteworthy. I also agree with Mark Frumento regarding the obvious labors of love from Sundazed and the rest he cites. But since much of what CC carries can't be found elsewhere, I'll still check their catalog when it arrives. (And yes, Sundazed too.) Art Longmire: > I see that [the Beau Brummels'] "Bradley's Barn" has also been > released - I've never heard it and I'm debating on whether to cough > up the cash for that one. While the Autumn Beau Brummels output remains my preferred BB, I remember liking "Bradley's Barn" better than "Triangle." (But I also like country music.) One caveat: the otherwise excellent remake of "You Tell Me Why" omits the distinctive harmonica theme in the intro, to me an essential part of the song. I also agree with you that Sal Valentino had a unique voice, and that's meant as a positive. TD Bell: > After hearing Frankie Lymon, Little Richard, and Gene Vincent - to > a hip little rock 'n' roller like me - LaRosa was strictly from > "Squares-ville" a.k.a. "Lawrence Welk City!", some crooner who > represented the utterly bland pop charts prior to "The Rise of Rock > and Roll", and he was another reason why we sang along with Chuck > Berry "Hail Hail Rock 'n' Roll/ Deliver me from the days of old!" > with feeling and conviction. Despite my "defense" of Julius LaRosa, my appreciation of him is primarily academic and historic. There ARE crooners who "got it" a lot more than he did, even. One example: Perry Como - "Tina Marie" and "Juke Box Baby" were pure corn, but the man got all the feeling he could out of them. Yes, there was a marked and blessed break between pre-rock-'n'-roll and the real deal, but remember too that many early rockers, once they established themselves, were often forced into a middle-road area to "broaden their appeal." And a few carried it off, notably and famously Bobby Darin and Frankie Lymon (whose "Goody Goody" and "Little Girl" embody the big band sound at its swingin'est; Roulette may have been stiffing Lymon on his royalties, but they didn't stint on the studio expenses on these tracks). And yes, Bill Reed, the issue was indeed the "some," not the "crooner." I too absolve our Dutch friend and hope we haven't scared him away; look what an interesting thread he generated.) Re: the Beatles mixes and versions: on the original promo 45 of "Penny Lane," there was a soprano trumpet phrase at the end which really buttoned the song up. On the hit version, the trumpet was lost to a long-resonating chord. On the original "Rarities" album in the US, the trumpet ride was restored. Does anyone know who took it away, and why? Bill Reed: > ...Fusion, a terrific, now-long-defunct Boston rock mag. Bill, I forgot what a great paper Fusion was; we used to get it and read it religiously in Providence. I may even still have a copy around in the dark reaches of the basement. And thank you for the rest of the stories about Brian, ?*&^%$@#? Records (just in case anyone's still out there), etc. Phil M.: > Suzi Jane Hokum is Suzi Jane Hokum. Although I've seen this spelling, on the LHI 45's with Lee Hazelwood, she's credited as "Hokom," which I believe is correct. However she spells it, her picture rocks! Anyone know if she's still around and active in the business? John Briggs: > I always admired Hefner and the civil libertarian causes he supports. > Wasn't there a Playboy record label back in the '70s? It seems > like I have a Barbi Benton LP of country tunes on a Playboy label. Mickey Gilley had success on the label as well. If I remember correctly, the label debuted in the late 50's or early 60's with Cy Coleman's jazz classic "Playboy's Theme," which was used on Hef's network TV show, "Playboy's Penthouse." It may have been a vanity operation until it "got serious" later on. And I second your comment about Hef's civil libertarian causes. Andrew Jones: > There have been passing mentions in this forum, and on the > Bacharach-David page, of songwriter Sherman Edwards. Although he > helped pen such hits as "Wonderful! Wonderful!", "See You In > September", "Johnny Get Angry" and "Broken-Hearted Melody", he's > probably best-known for writing the Broadway musical "1776". I was under the impression that he co-wrote "Baby Blue" by the Echoes on Seg-Way, which was a big hit in 1960 ("B-B-A-B-Y, B-B-L-U-E"). The story I heard was that he (or was it his co-writer?) was a vice- principal at either a junior or senior high school on Long Island, NY, discovered the group among his students, and wrote the song for them. Or is this just an "suburban legend"? Country Paul (up too late to stay up to date) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 10:35:30 +0100 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re: Martin Scorsese's The Blues I've seen the Mike Figgis segment (Red White & Blues) and read about the rest of Scorsese's series, and it seems to me to be a mistake to go looking here for a comprehensive history of the blues. Even Figgis's highly enjoyable contribution is essentially impressionistic: there's barely a mention of Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated, for instance, and no Long John Baldry or Rod Stewart at all (whatever you think of Stewart now, his early appearances as a member of Baldry's Hoochie Coochie Men were electrifying). But Scorsese is not trying to be Ken Burns, whose history of jazz purported to tell the whole story and thus opened itself up to criticisms on the grounds of omission and distortion. The Figgis programme, incidentally, contains riveting b&w footage of Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the Muddy Waters band with Otis Spann and Little Walter, and Booker T and the MGs before they grew their hair. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 12:12:22 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Jim Fairs from the Cryan' Shames I've recently bought the Cryan' Shames first two albums, and love the songs of Jim Fairs. I was particularly won over by the mellow B- side 'The Warm', which he singlehandedly recorded and sang lead & harmonies on. Now, does anyone here know what he went on to do after quitting the Shames around 68? It seems to me that he was really up to something great... With regards Martin, Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 13:14:14 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Rainy Daze, Gilbert, Playboy Records JJ wrote: > One of the best, a beautifully crafted piece of pop-psych was > originally released as "Fe Fi Fo Fum", but was almost immediately > withdrawn and reissued with a different title, "Blood Of Oblivion", I really like "Blood of Oblivion". It was top 10 I think on one of my KYNO Fresno charts under "Fe Fi Fo Fum". Certainly, the group was from Denver. The record and flip (I believe) went top 10 in Denver. JJ wrote: > Tim Gilbert, the main songwriter, also released a solo 45 "Early > October"/"If We Stick Together" (UNI 55045) 1967- A great song! Love this (If We Stick Together) song that did chart on Denver's KIMN. Kinda "Dylan takes 'Eve of Destruction' and puts opposing twist on it"???? Orion wrote: > Are the Rainy Days and Rainy Daze the same group? Rainy Daze had > the LP with Acapulco Gold which would have been a much bigger hit, > had it not been for the Radio Stations pulling once it was realized > that Acapulco Gold was Mary Jane in disguise. Same group (at least, the 2 songs you refer to). Same spelling too: Rainy Daze. Really don't think "Acapulco Gold" would have charted much higher even if stations didn't pull it. Falls into the Fraternity of Man's "Don't Bogart Me" category--"did we really expect this to be a hit?". That does not mean both aren't good, tho. Mark Wirtz wrote: > Arguably, Playboy's most notable (pop/rock) release was an album by > the Hudson Brothers, signed to Playboy during the short A&R "reign" > of Bob Cullen Indeed, the Hudson Brothers'Playboy 45, "Leavin' It's Over" was top 10 in Omaha on KOIL. Great Beatles rip off music (as much of their best stuff was). Don't forget that Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds was probably Playboy's biggest act. By the way, Mark, I love "Excerpt from a Teenage Opera". Bobster wrote: > a minor hit by one Lois Fletcher (whoever she was!) from 1974 > entitled "I Am What I Am". I'd forgot all about that one! What a cool little song that disappeared into (blood of?) oblivion! Yes, who was Lois Fletcher? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 06:56:56 -0700 (PDT) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Richard Perry Richard Perry also produced Leo Sayer ["You Make Me Feel Like Dancin'", "When I Need You", "More Than I Can Say"], Carly Simon ["Your So Vain"], Ringo Starr ["Photograph", "You're Sixteen"], Randy Travis ["It's Just A Matter of Time"]. Richard and I became friends in the mid-sixties when we were neighbors at 1650 B'way. He was producing the "God Bless Tiny Tim" album and recorded one of my songs "Daddy, Daddy What is Heaven Like?". His first gold album and mine. Over the years he became the number one producer that writers and publishers would persue. Unlike Phil Spector and Jeff Barry, who co- write most of their hits, Richard isn't a writer and depends totally on outside material. I remember when I ran the professional dept. at Warner Bros. Music in the early 70s, Richard was always the first to hear our best songs. When I heard he was looking for a hit for Fats Domino. I updated the old Johnny Burnette hit "Your'e 16" using a Fats Domino Feel. Richard loved it..........but didn't cut it with Fats. Over the next two and a half years It was turned down by 122 artists and producers!! My little piano voice demo became an ongoing joke at the publishing company .......until Richard Perry finally cut it with Ringo Starr and sold 5 million records. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 06:15:15 -0700 (PDT) From: Artie Wayne Subject: The Duprees - an apology I want to apologize to Spectropop and the Duprees.A few weeks ago I wrote that Ronnie Dante, Jerry Keller and I sang background on "You Belong to me"..........that was incorrect.......we sang on "Count Every Star". I was thinking "Count Every Star" but foolishly wrote down "You Belong to Me". Please don't banish me to an 80s discussion group. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 10:40:02 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Martin Scorcese's "Blues" Bill Reed: > Brother Ray was on the Clint Eastwood installment dealing with > piano blues that was shown Saturday night in the U.S. Charles, > in new footage, was shown playing simply great piano. Also > featured were Fats Domino, Oscar Peterson, Art Tatum, Dr. John > and others. Saw this one last night. NYC ran the series a day behind other areas. It was one of the best in the group. Oscar Peterson playng boggie woogie blues with Andre Previn--that was worth the price of admission. Lots of Dr. John. Professor Longhair. (Not the world's greatest lyricist - but that's OK if all he ever wrote was Tipitina). Otis Spann, Jay McShann and Ray Charles talking about listening to the Grand Ol' Opry as a kid----great stuff. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 13:39:28 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Playboy Records THATS a cool idea for a new Cd...The Best of Playboy Records...... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 14:24:53 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Scorcese's Blues Art writes: > The section on British Blues was excellent but I could have done > with more original film of the people being discussed-the Rolling > Stones clip they showed was exactly the same clip used in another > section of the series. I used to hate British Blues--thought they were inposters, but I've grown to appreciate what they did with it and what they did for it. But there were some great moments-Skip James, Muddy Waters and the Chess story with Marshall Chess-I'm one of those who grew up hearing how awful "Electric Mud" was-yet several people whose opinions I respect have praised it! The Chess story and the Chess footage, stills were wonderful- but Marshall??? Annoying, cloying and too full of himself for me to bear. That was some label--WOW--besides all thee blues they did a lot of good R&B. Chess/Checker--Rescue Me (Fontella Bass) was Checker. They also were capable of picking up good stuff done elsewhere--Smokey Places for instance. I think Shirley and Lee out of New Orleans were on Alladin, which I beleive was a Chess sub label. One of the first 78's I owned was their "I'm Gone". Everyone remembers "Come On Baby Let The Good Times Roll", I'm not sure what label that was on--perhaps Imperial. Sister Rosetta Tharpe-I've heard of her but seeing her was a revelation-what a guitar player! It took seeing that footage for me to finally appreciate that my father tried to turn me on to her when I was a kid about 10 years old ....and him a Gershwin fan. All in all, this series really was worth the 14 hours I watched it. I mean..."it seems to me" where else could you get all those fine things they "laid upon the table"? Thank God for PBS. Rashkovksy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 14:58:28 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Baby Jane Holzer Mark wrote: > Anyone know anything about her? I have an episode of a 60s rock show, > maybe Hullaballoo but I'm not sure, with her doing a nice song. All > I've found on vinyl is 1 45 on Atco that's pretty good. Was she a > model who tried singing, ala Twiggy? I don't know much about her pre-Pop activities, but I do know that she was one of the galaxy of so-called Superstars -- many of them fallen richkids and beautifulpeople -- that revolved around Andy Warhol at his successive Factories in New York City. A 2002 interview with her, conducted by Anita Pallenberg (although it's really more a conversation than formal interview), can be found at http://www.warholstars.org/warhol/warhol1/andy/janeholzer.html. A photo of her in all her '60s glory -- and demonstrating the huge mane of blonde hair referenced in Roxy Music's "Virginia Plain" -- can be seen at http://imv.au.dk/~jfogde/entourage/entourage.html. This latter page, a gallery of Warhol associates, also mentions that Holzer "Was the star of the short story 'Girl Of The Year' in Tom Wolfe's 'The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby'." --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 16:06:18 -0400 From: Orion Subject: Re: Richard Perry Wow, Artie that many turndowns and you kept on charging. I and many others are sure glad you did. I can only imagine the number of "shutouts", "turndowns", etc that must go on since very few cut the mustard out of so many attempts. Peace.... Orion -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 13:09:33 -0700 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Re: The Beau Brummels I spoke with Ace Records label guy, Alec Palao, a short while back and he informed me that he and Ace are almost finished with their Beau Brummels Complete box set... along the lines of the Zombies one that Alec put together some years back. He also said that the sound was pretty astonishing, but that the new box wouldn't have every track from the Sundazed 3 cd "SF Sessions," but it will have everything else, and then some. peace, albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 20:36:54 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Jim Fairs from the Cryan' Shames Martin Jensen wrote: > I've recently bought the Cryan' Shames first two albums, and love > the songs of Jim Fairs. I was particularly won over by the mellow B- > side 'The Warm', which he singlehandedly recorded and sang lead & > harmonies on. Now, does anyone here know what he went on to do after > quitting the Shames around 68? It seems to me that he was really up > to something great... Hello Martin, I don't really have any info on Jim Fairs, just wanted to say that I also am a big fan of "The Warm"-it has long been one of my favorite tunes, and I also wondered about Fairs when I first heard the song. I found a promotional copy of the 45 back in 1984 (of course the flip side is the equally great "Greenburg, Glickstein, Charles, David Smith and Jones") and was enchanted by the melancholy, beautiful sound of this track. I got it on CD last year and on reading the liner notes found out that Fairs had recorded it just before leaving the group. What's all the more amazing is that he was only in his early 20's when he did this wonderful song. I too would like to find out if he did any further recordings after leaving the Cryan Shames. I have seen records by Isaac Guillory, the member of the Shames who wrote "Greenburg, Glickstein, etc."-I seem to remember hearing that he passed away recently. Art -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 18:27:09 -0000 From: David A. Young Subject: Youm made me love you The provocatively named Paul Balser requested information about the CD availability of the song "(You Can't Take) My Boyfriend's Woody" as recorded by The Powder Puffs and The Angels. The latter version appears on their Polygram "Best of" collection, which at this time appears to be available on cassette but out of print on CD (!?). To my knowledge, The Powder Puffs' version has yet to appear on a legit CD, although it is found on the "gray area" compilation "Surf Bunnies and Hot Rod Honeys" -- and, for now at least, in musica, alongside its backing track, released as "Youm" by Bassett Hand. Enjoy, David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:46:39 +0100 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: Re: Carol Kaye / Suzi Jane Hokum Michael Coxe wrote: > What I miss are her comments that cut through much of the emotional > ties to music, hearsay and legend to deliver the facts... Indeed, being corrected by Carol as to the exact location of a Harpers Bizarre recording session was a proud moment for me! Kurt wrote: > So, for a couple of years now I've been under the impression that > Nancy Sinatra was Suzi Jane Hokum... I understand Kurt! When I first started buying Lee Hazlewood records I thought she might be too. I think it's the surname that gives people that impression - it sounds so like the product of Lee's imagination - maybe it was? A much underrated SJH moment is "Suzi Jane Is Back In Town" (now available on Ace's Lee CD) where she and Lee goof off in full Laugh-In fashion. Hilarious stuff and one of my favourite records. Guy http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TweedleeDumsDrive-In/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 06 Oct 2003 21:51:58 +0100 From: Ian Slater Subject: Connie and the Cones (and Darlene Woods & the Starlings) Does anyone know anything about this female lead doo-wop type group, or have any pictures of them? "I See the Image of You" is a great favourite of mine. To my knowledge, they had the following releases: I Love My Teddybear/Lonely Girls Prayer 1959 Roulette R-4223 I See the Image of You (Fortune & Ball)/Let Us Pretend (Fortune & Ball) 1959 NRC (National Recording Corporation) 506 Nu-Star Music/Kenny Barlow Music BMI No Time For Tears (Russell & Willis)/Take All the Kisses (Russell & Willis) 1960 Roulette 4313 (Queensbury Music & Conmar Music) The Roulette tracks appeared on the CD compilations "Poodle Skirts & Pony Tails - Lost Groups" on the "Babe" "label". I think NRC was a label based in Atlanta, Georgia: http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/artists/c/conn3500.htm Any information or tips as to where to get a lead would be gratefully received. I'd also like to know about Darlene Woods and the Starlings who John Weathers enquired about (2 October, Digest 1042). Just the one record that John mentioned, to my knowledge. Both were written by "N. Venet" - presumably Nick Venet as he was associated with this (LA?) label and published by Noel Music. Nice rocking doo-wop girl-led stuff with great rock n' roll instrumental breaks. Ian Slater -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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