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Spectropop - Digest Number 1038



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Mark Wirtz
           From: Mark Wirtz 
      2. Re: Fading Yellow CDs
           From: Sebastian Fonzeus 
      3. Re: Fading Yellow CDs
           From: JB 
      4. Re: The Majority / Majority One
           From: Mark Frumento 
      5. Re: Fading Yellow CDs
           From: Pekka Laine 
      6. Fantasia
           From: Harvey Williams 
      7. Re: Fading Yellow CDs
           From: Scott 
      8. Re: Ray, Goodman & Brown
           From: various
      9. Re: Before And After
           From: Clark Besch 
     10. Mono vs. Stereo
           From: Paul Woods 
     11. Re: The Big TNT Show
           From: David Coyle 
     12. Re: The mono "White Album"
           From: Richard Hattersley 
     13. Re: Oh . . . Kaye!
           From: James Botticelli 
     14. Re: Ray, Goodman & Brown
           From: Simon White 
     15. Re: This Could Be The Night
           From: Phil Milstein 
     16. Re: MFQ
           From: Bill Reed 
     17. Phil's Spectre
           From: Mick Patrick 
     18. A lost song
           From: Max Weiner 
     19. Re: This Could Be The Night
           From: Roger Smith 
     20. These Could Be The "Nights"
           From: Bill Reed 
     21. Re: Fading Yellow CDs
           From: Martin Jensen 
     22. Re: Oh . . . Kaye!
           From: Steve Harvey 
     23. Re: MFQ
           From: Doug 
     24. Re: Phil's Spectre
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     25. What's Shakin'; thanks, Mick and Tony
           From: Country Paul 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 16:57:42 -0400 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Mark Wirtz Max Weiner writes: >Dear Mark Wirtz, >Many years ago I had a copy of "Out of his Head", a biography of Phil >Spector (forgive me I can't remember the authors name), but he made >reference to a Mark Wirtz that did a tribute album to Phil. By any >chance are you that same Mark Wirtz? Yes, I am :) Mind you, the official tribute was a single, not an entire album, though I produced other tributes/homages to Phil, notably "Lying Awake" by Dany Chandelle (EMI), "Richest Man Alive" by Ray Singer (Ember), and "Make Time Stand Still" by Tony Summers (EMI) Thank you for your interest. Best, mark w -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 22:11:05 +0200 From: Sebastian Fonzeus Subject: Re: Fading Yellow CDs Mark wrote: >Here's my question. Are these more pop or more psych? In order words, >what I usually go by is if Vernon Joynson hates something means its >good and the more he likes it, the worse it is. So before I order >these 5 CDs, how poppy are they? I like ultra-commercial records that >sound like they could have and should have been Top 40 hits. Definitely MUCH more of the latter. Lots of should've-been-hits and well orchestrated/produced pop music. At the moment I'm playing volume 5 a lot. The UK volumes (1, 04 and 5) are my favourites, but there are some absolute belters on the US volumes as well such as the original version by Eddie Hodges of "Shadows And Reflexions", Giant Jellybean Copout's MAJESTIC "Look At The Girls", July Four's "Frightened Little Girl", Disraeli's "What Will The New Day Bring", The Poor's "How Many Tears", Peppermint Trolley Co.'s vastly superior version of Roger Nichols wonderful "Trust" etc. I could go on. Perhaps should add that the mastering is a tad bit on the "loud" and slightly distorted side on the US volumes. Just wait until you hear Angel Pavement's "When Will I See June Again" (vol. 5)... WHOOSH! Now that is one FINE piece of joyous, uptempo Left Banke-ish pop. Recommended. Take care! Sebastian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 15:52:13 EDT From: JB Subject: Re: Fading Yellow CDs The Fading Yellow series definitely leans towards the pop side, i.e. little to no wailing guitars, crashing drums, screamed vocals, etc. You will hear some fuzz or phased or backwards guitar and similar effects, but also plenty of orchestration, harmony vocals, etc. The fact that the series included Eddie Hodges' original version of "Shadows & Reflections" (later made famous to our lot via The Action's version) may say something about the series -- it draws from the rare, obscure and pop end of the continuum. JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 22:59:39 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: The Majority / Majority One Mark wrote: > Does anyone have a discography that they can post on this group? Seems you may have to live with the Tap of Delights disography until someone digs up all the facts. Until then I'll give my additions to that discography (maybe local Majority expert Luis Suarez will chime in too): As The Majority: Charlotte Rose/Time is on Your Side Time Machine (demo/acetate on Hen's Teeth Vol 3 CD) As Majority One: Bacause I Love/Get Back Home* Glass Image/Friday Man* Game*/I See Her Everywhere Majority One (LP) * non LP tracks The best biography of the group is in Ray Moody's 'The Sound of the Cities: Nearly Famous' which covers bands from Hull, York etc. He points out the the name change from Majority to Majority One came in 1970 after all but two of the original members left. A great harmony band who definitely a band that deserves a compilation like the one done on the Consortium recently. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 11:14:43 +0300 From: Pekka Laine Subject: Re: Fading Yellow CDs Mark: > Here's my question. Are these more pop or more psych? > In order words, what I usually go by is if Vernon Joynson > hates something means it's good and the more he likes it, > the worse it is. So before I order these 5 CDs, how poppy > are they? I like ultra-commercial records that sound like > they could have and should have been Top 40 hits. Definitely more pop than psych. The whole series is excellent. Enough variety from folky sounds to orchestral to make them really great records to actually listen to. Volume 1 is one of the best 60s comps in recent years IMHO Pekka Laine -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 10:19:55 +0100 From: Harvey Williams Subject: Fantasia I recently picked up a wonderful 45 credited to Fantasia called "Gotta Get Away", a UK pressing on Stateside from 1967 (though it appears that it was probably released on Mala/Bell in the US). Does anyone know anything more about this group? Any more releases? Band line-up (though it wouldn't surprise me if this were a studio-only project)? Richard Perry is credited with production & as a co-writer if that helps, and Flip Perryn & Scott Lowe are also mentioned in the writing credits, though they're new names to me. The record itself is another multi-segment Good Vibrations knock-off in the style of the Full Treatment's Just Can't Wait, and the harmonies are simply stunning. You'll love it. Any more info would be much appreciated! All the best, HarveyW -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 23:21:16 -0000 From: Scott Subject: Re: Fading Yellow CDs Mark wrote: > Here's my question. Are these more pop or more psych? > In order words, what I usually go by is if Vernon Joynson > hates something means it's good and the more he likes it, > the worse it is. So before I order these 5 CDs, how poppy > are they? I like ultra-commercial records that sound like > they could have and should have been Top 40 hits. > Looking forward to the responses. As someone who has all five Fading Yellow CDs and loves them all equally let me just say that you will not be disappointed by ANY of these. The material is basically pop, but given when these tracks were recorded they do manage to catch a great deal of what was in the air back then. A great majority of these tracks certainly could have been hits; not big hits perhaps but hits all the same. Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 14:54:10 -0000 From: various Subject: Re: Ray, Goodman & Brown Simon White wrote: > Ray, Goodman & Brown (?)... > ...were The Manhattans after they lost the rights to use the name. Jerophonic: Sorry, they were actually The Moments, from around Long Branch, New Jersey, who had many great soul hits, and who finally crossed over with "Love on a Two Way Street". The Manhattans, from Jersey City, have sung under that name since the early 60's. "Blue" Lovett,the bass singer who does the spoken intro on their big hit "Kiss and Say Goodbye", has been with the group throughout. DJ Jimmy B: Actually they were The Moments. "Love On A Two Way Street" Stang Rekkids outta Jersey. Eric Charge: Errr - you mean The Moments ! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 04:48:11 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Before And After > Artie Wayne: > One of the [Van McCoy] songs I placed at April-Blackwood > was "Before And After" with Lor Crane, who produced it with > Chad And Jeremy. I'm glad a lot of you remember it. Stuffed Animal wrote: > The version I remember is the excellent Claus Ogerman-arranged > version from Lesley Gore's stunning MY TOWN, MY GUY AND ME album. Hi guys, I love "Before & After". I was lucky enough to work on the Sundazed Cd reissue and one of the bonus tracks is a great alternate version of the song! Amazing to hear this cool and "coulda been the 45" version! Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 09:59:36 +0100 (GMT Daylight Time) From: Paul Woods Subject: Mono vs. Stereo Matthew asked: > My question for all of you is this: Is there a site on the > internet that lists the differences between mono and stereo > mixes. For example that Dylan's "Blonde On Blonde" contains > totally different takes of certain songs in the two formats. > Are there more examples of this? My pal Roger Ford has an amazingly detailed site on different versions of Dylan material. It's at: http://www.rdf.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/ Best wishes, Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 14:43:06 -0700 (PDT) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: The Big TNT Show If you compare the opening sequence of the "Big TNT Show" (especially the group of teens shown running down the street past storefronts) with the scene from "That Thing You Do" where the band hears their song on the radio for the first time, it becomes apparent where Tom Hanks got his inspiration. How much did the Modern Folk Quartet actually record, and is "This Could Be The Night" on CD anywhere? I've only heard one other song by the MFQ, and that's "It Was A Very Good Year," which is very much rooted in the original folk boom. "Night" is a folk-pop classic that stands up to time a lot more than "Here They Come (From All Over The World)". David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 10:14:11 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Re: The mono "White Album" Alfie: > I don't understand why, with the constant repackaging and > remastering of albums, there aren't more audiophile versions > in mono. It's more likely that we'll soon get to hear surround > sound versions of our favourite songs, than hear them as they > were originally intended. I agree, the Beatles back catelogue is the biggest offender there. Most 60s bands hav made at least some effort to put out both mixes. Pink Floyd put out a special edition "piper" in original mono The Beach Boys CDs were stereo where available but they use mono mixes on the box set. The Four Seasons put out a few of their mono singles on the Edizione D'oro CD. When EMI was 100 they put out a great series of 60s CDs that featured both stereo and mono mixes. Artists such as the Hollies, Cliff Richard and Manfred Mann. The Beatles/Apple/EMI however have wasted every opportunity to out mono versions, e.g. The 30th anniversary white album would have shifted many more units had it not been identical (sonically) to the original CD (stereo). The "1" album was another chance to give us some mono action without having to fork out loads for the mono CD singles but i was not to be. I also heard at one point one was gonna feature remixes where possible(a la Submarine songtrack) but but although I heard great stereo remixes on Anthology and various tv promo vids for songs like "Ticket To Ride", "Help", "Penny Lane" and most notably "Paperback Writer", the CD only featured the original stereo versions. A was totally convinced they would not let the 30th anniversary of 'Pepper pass without putting out a mono version on CD, but alas it passed without a whimper. As so many people have said, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, The Byrds and even The Monkees are excelently represented on CD. The Beatles however laguish in 80s CD, sonically dull, 02 page booklet HELL!! rant over :-) Richard http://www.wiz.to/richardsnow -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 20:05:01 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Oh . . . Kaye! Steve Harvey wrote: > No, she [Carol Kaye] was a jazz guitarist in the early > days up until the early 60s when some bassist failed to > show up for a session. Carol picked up the bass and the > rest is history. Carol was on this list for a long time in the late 9T's and early 00's. Suddenly she was no more. Ed. - Carol Kaye now has her own comprehensive website: http://www.carolkaye.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:30:26 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Ray, Goodman & Brown Simon wrote: > Ray, Goodman & Brown (?)... > ...were The Manhattans after they lost the rights to use the name. > Jerophonic: > Sorry, they were actually The Moments, > DJ Jimmy B: > Actually they were The Moments. > Eric Charge: > Errr - you mean The Moments ! Well, having spent the last two months working on a compilation that includes three Moments tracks, I really should have seen that one coming ! Keep taking the tablets, Simon......... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 11:53:40 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: This Could Be The Night David Coyle wrote: > How much did the Modern Folk Quartet actually record, and is "This > Could Be The Night" on CD anywhere? I've only heard one other song > by the MFQ, and that's "It Was A Very Good Year," which is very > much rooted in the original folk boom. "Night" is a folk-pop > classic that stands up to time a lot more than "Here They Come > (From All Over The World)". "This Could Be The Night" is available on the 4-CD "Back To Mono" Spector box Abkco put out in 1991 (and for all I know there may be other reissues of it). I love that record -- I've always read it as Spector's answer to "Pet Sounds," esp. the prominent use of the chromatic harmonica. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 16:06:15 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: Re: MFQ David Coyle wrote: > How much did the Modern Folk Quartet actually record, and is "This > Could Be The Night" on CD anywhere? I've only heard one other song > by the MFQ, and that's "It Was A Very Good Year," which is very > much rooted in the original folk boom. "Night" is a folk-pop > classic that stands up to time a lot more than "Here They Come > (From All Over The World)". I have two albums by MFQ from '63 & '64 on Warner Bros in that fabulous new process Vitaphonic (!) Stereo. Though both feature Tad Diltz, "Night's" vocal soloist, neither sound remotely like the group did after PS got finished making them over on this one-off from '65. Hard to believe that this great track had to wait until 1976 to see the light of day. . .on PS "Rare Masters 2." "Very Good Year", BTW, is from their first WB LP, "Changes." The goup also featured the Lovin Spoonful's Jerry Yester. Bill Reed www.cllrdr.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 20:09:44 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Phil's Spectre Some of you will enjoy the following essay by Spector biographer Rob Finnis on the new "Phil's Spectre" CD. To read more, visit: http://www.acerecords.co.uk/gotrt/sept03/cdchd978.html Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------------------------- Phil Spector's vision rose far above and beyond that of any of his contemporaries. In fact, Spector saw himself as the sole occupant of a parallel recording universe where his was the only way, and everyone else was nowhere. This, to a large degree, was what made him 'different' and 'difficult' in equal measure. One only has to hear the absorbing out-takes from some of his Philles sessions to gain an insight into the man. Hovering authoritatively in the control room at the fabled Gold Star studios, he is by turns, cocky, amusing and skittish depending on the mood of the moment. Above all, he is endlessly patient. As take after take is aborted (over 30 on Be My Baby) and the massed musicians, numbed by repetition, are audibly beginning to wilt, Spector acts as a calming presence, nonchalantly easing them into one take after another, as though their interests, as much as his, were at stake. It took a unique man to create such historic sounds and, given his commercial success, he was bound to attract imitators. Sundry producers, artists, songwriters and arrangers attempted to hitch a ride on the Spector bandwagon in the period spanning, roughly, 1963-1967. Some of them came tantalisingly close to getting it right, most notably those who had actually worked alongside Spector such as Sonny Bono, Nino Tempo, Jack Nitzsche and the Righteous Brothers, all of whose work is amply represented here. Others were too conventional in their approach to get it right. Ace are justifiably proud of this release which brings together 24 of the finest mirror images of the Spector Sound. Assembled with artful deliberation by Mick Patrick and Tony Rounce, Phil's Spectre reflects the variation in tone, colour and density that characterised Spector's own work. (Not all of Spector's productions were quite as blockish as posterity will have you believe. Take I Love How You Love Me by the Paris Sisters or Walking In The Rain by the Ronettes. These are records as subtle as you are likely to hear.) A few tracks alone warrant the purchase of this CD. Carol Connors' My Baby Looks (But He Don't Touch) features the lady who sang lead on the Teddy Bears' To Know Him Is To Love Him being produced by another ex-Teddy Bear, Marshall Leib. Leib also produced Alder Ray's A Little Love (Will Go A Long Way), arguably the most accurate Spector facsimile of them all. Leib once claimed he knew better than most Spector's thought processes in the studio and, on this evidence, he may have a case. Then there's Yes Sir That's My Baby by Hale & The Hushabyes, a legendary studio concoction masterminded by Jack Nitzsche that features Edna Wright (aka Sandy Wynns) singing lead, with the Blossoms, Sonny & Cher, Jackie DeShannon and Brian Wilson, among others, buried in the massed chorus. Carole King and Gerry Goffin wrote I Can't Make It Alone with the Righteous Brothers in mind but P J Proby got to cut it first. I subscribe to Nick Cohn's view that Proby ranks among the finest pop vocalists of the rock era. This majestic 45 was cut in LA after Proby had temporarily returned to America in 1966 following a spate of bad publicity in the UK. Jack Nitzsche's spectacular production reflects the Righteous Brothers' influence and Proby's vocal does it justice. This is the first time the 45 single version (on which Proby duets with himself) has been released on CD. Even mighty Motown was not averse to casting a nod in Spector's direction - step forward the Supremes! As Mick Patrick tell us, their Spector-ish Run, Run, Run (a Holland, Dozier, Holland song), was recorded in May 1963, a time when Motown had yet to establish a definitive 'sound' of its own and occasionally looked to rivals such as Spector or the Cameo label as a source of inspiration. Holland, Dozier, Holland also penned Too Hurt To Cry, Too Much In Love To Say Goodbye, by the Darnells, a Motown one-off from 1963 featuring Gladys Horton of the Marvelettes moonlighting as lead vocalist. The set closes with Please Phil Spector, a fun item with an odd little history of its own. Written and sung as a throwaway by New Yorker Mike Lendell (Rashkow), it was licensed to a small US label as the intended B-side of Washington Square, a Lendell production the company never got around to actually issuing. However, somehow, in 1967, the record surfaced in the UK on the Phillips label credited to a non-existent band, the Attack (unconnected with the British band of the same name). Even Lendell himself was unaware, until recently, that his aborted US 45 had made it to the UK. The booklet, as glossy and colourful as a fashion supplement only more absorbing, contains the full low-down on each title together with matching illustrations. We should mention this fond and glorious homage to the great producer was in Ace's pipeline long before Uncle Phil's tribulations reverberated around the world. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 12:09:58 -0700 (PDT) From: Max Weiner Subject: A lost song I hope you folks can help me. I am looking for a song that I had many years ago on a reel to reel. I don't know the name and the only lyrics I can remember are "when I was with you girl, I made the grade, but since you've gone, I've had it made". It had a really pretty electric guitar that was folk-rockish in quality. The guitar sounded similar to the guitar used in the song "Little Black Egg", circa 1965. If anybody can help, it would be appreciated. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:43:11 -0400 From: Roger Smith Subject: Re: This Could Be The Night > "This Could Be The Night" is available on the 4-CD "Back To Mono" > Spector box Abkco put out in 1991 (and for all I know there may be > other reissues of it). I don't know of any other CD with MFQ's version of the song. Harry Nilsson wrote "This Could Be the Night" as sort of a tribute to Brian Wilson. Phil Spector produced MFQ's recording of it, but didn't release the song until later. David Cassidy recorded the song for his 1975 album "The Higher They Climb, The Harder They Fall". Cassidy added lyrics to the song (and his name to the songwriting credits). Los Angeles DJ, Rodney Bingenheimer, had been using the MFQ version of "This Could Be the Night" as his theme song for years. So, in 1987, Henry Diltz (former MFQ member, but best known now as a rock photographer) recorded "This Could Be the Night" for the album "The Best of Rodney on the ROQ". Harry Nilsson attended the recording session, but I don't think he appears on the recording. Nilsson recorded a new version of "This Could Be the Night" in 1993 for "Lost and Found", his unreleased last album. The new version has additional verses. Brian Wilson recorded "This Could Be the Night" for the "For The Love Of Harry: Everybody Sings Nilsson" tribute album released in May of 1995. He claimed the song was a favorite of his. The song written by Harry Nilsson as a tribute to Brian Wilson was finally recorded by Wilson as a tribute to Nilsson. :-) -- Roger http://www.harrynilsson.com/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:44:15 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: These Could Be The "Nights" > Hard to believe that this great track had to wait until 1976 to see > the light of day. . .on PS "Rare Masters 2." In my haste, I forgot to add that there are at least two recorded homages to the MFQ version of the Nilsson/Spector "Night": 1. Brian Wilson on "For the Love of Harry: Everybody Sings Harry Nilsson" Music Masters 65127-2, 1994. 2. Tatsuro Yamashita on his 1978 album, Go Ahead. Yamashita was the compiler and annotater of an official Japanese boxed Spector set that at the last minute fell through the cracks, though rumor persists that a few copies of the multi-CD affair did make its way through the production process before it was quashed for unknown reasons. Additionally yours, Bill Reed www.cllrdr.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:55:15 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: Re: Fading Yellow CDs Can a track list for these cd's be obtained somewhere and where can you order them? Martin Denmark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 15:14:25 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Oh . . . Kaye! When I first started emailing I wrote Carol Kaye at her site. Got an answer within half an hour. Write with a question and you'll get about 20 pages of Carol history in reply. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 23:10:52 -0000 From: Doug Subject: Re: MFQ These are the MFQ 45's I have: It Was A Very Good Year-Warner Bro 5387 If All You Think-Warner Bro 5481 That's Alright With Me-Warner Bro 5623 Night Time Girl-Dunhill 4025 Don't You Wonder/I Had A Dream Last Night-Dunhill 4137 I listed both sides on the last one because it's a great two sided record; my favorite by them. Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 20:44:07 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Phil's Spectre Mick Patrick wrote: > Some of you will enjoy the essay by Spector biographer Rob > Finnis > on the new "Phil's Spectre" CD. To read it, visit: > http://www.acerecords.co.uk/gotrt/sept03/cdchd978.html Well I sure enjoyed it. Rashkovsky (aka Mike Lendell) risen from the dead and loving it -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:58:40 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: What's Shakin'; thanks, Mick and Tony Re: "What's Shakin'": my copy "developed legs" a while back, so (1) I forgot the name and (2) I stand corrected regarding the Doors. But as Steve Harvey noted, Paul Harris did produce the Spoonful tracks. Mick Patrick, Tony Hatch's info on Garry Mills and the Breakwaways is fascinating. Thank you. Still catching up, Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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