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Spectropop - Digest Number 1018



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 16 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Starsailor
           From: Mark Wirtz 
      2. Re: Jerry Keller
           From: Artie Wayne 
      3. Re: Dickie Goodman
           From: Roger Smith 
      4. Re: Starsailor
           From: Mark Wirtz 
      5. Re: The Younghearts
           From: David Gordon 
      6. Pussycats / Puss n' Boots - Same Group?
           From: Rich 
      7. Re: Shadow Morton
           From: David Gordon 
      8. Re: Dickie Goodman
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: Shadow Morton
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     10. The Breakaways CD
           From: Supreme Dream 
     11. Re: Jerry Keller / The Duprees
           From: Mikey 
     12. Re: The Breakaways CD
           From: Mick Patrick 
     13. Re: RIP Warren Zevon
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     14. Oh, Canada!
           From: Keith 
     15. Crystals "Uptown" in stereo
           From: cmoeh 
     16. Re: Starsailor
           From: Mike Rashkow 


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Message: 1 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:04:34 -0400 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Starsailor Country Paul: > My reaction when I heard the song a while ago was not as > positive as yours or the article's. I think re-listening > may be in order. Phil Chapman: > Hi Paul - I was quoting the introductory paragraph to the > interview. Like you, I was not as impressed as I hoped to > be. It's a good song, good vocal, and is all over MTV, so > it should be a hit. Most of ye olde Spector trademarks are > there - big drums, layered percussion, intricate mid-range > - but all kept carefully under restraint, giving me the > feeling that it's not really *his* mix. It's well recorded > and I suspect balanced astutely for commercial purposes. > Personally, I would have preferred the full-on assault, but > I wonder whether or not that would have actually reduced its > chance of success. Oh, how well and delicately put --- good old Phil Chapman, always the diplomat... Bless ya, Phil :) My opinion, as a lifelong Spector student and fan(atic), even having produced and released tributes to the man, AS WELL AS being a fan of Starsailor's music, I find this release to be a disgrace. It may well become a "hit," and elements of the record (notably the brilliantly performed and recorded vocals) make it deservedly so among Starsailor fans. Alas, to me, this hybrid is nevertheless a tragic humiliation of Spector (or "echo-boy" as Starsailor so condescendingly call him) - and at the worst possible time. No doubt (and according to the article), it was the "Silence Is Easy" song in demo form that initially attracted Mr. Spector. Hardly surprising - it is exactly the kind of simple, hypnotic, melodic tune and message that Spector was such a master of transcending into a riveting spectacle. And I bet, any of us that KNOW Spector's style, can virtually hear it, truly and fully realised HIS way. And with visionaries like Spector, there is only that one way. All else is "a little bit pregnant." Having heard the entire album, as well as having been very familiar with Starsailor's first CD, it appears that the pairing of Spector and Starsailor was an inevitable collision waiting to happen, making for a symbiotic, not synergistic partnership - with Starsailor the vegetarian, and carnivorous Spector trying to open a steak house together... In my fantasy, Spector would have passed on producing Starsailor, then ultimately grabbed that song (as anybody could once published), and autonomously recorded and released it with a brand new artist (ideally a soulful girl singer) under his control. Man, I would rob my piggy bank to buy and own and possess THAT record!!! In conclusion, the most tragic aspect of this whole thing is that it DOES give the impression to the unsuspecting public that Spector HAS lost his touch and is all washed up (making many in the industry speculate privately that, therefore, this is Spector's last record ever). To wit, and I challenge you: Pick any music fan who has never heard of Spector, sit them down and play them "Silence Is Easy" as an introduction to the man's genius. You know what reaction you'll get by the end of the record? A vacant, "So?" And you'll have to quickly grab a copy of "River Deep," or "Loving Feeling," to put things right. Even though the "Silence Is Easy" tune and Starsailor's vocal performance has gotten under my skin, I cannot listen to the darn thing anymore.. It turns my stomach and makes me want to weep... Sadly, Mark Wirtz -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 06:52:03 -0700 (PDT) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Jerry Keller Mick.......How ya' doin'? I'm glad to hear that Jerry Keller is alive and well and living in Nashville. He's a good guy and one of my favorite songwriting collaborators. We became friends after he did the demo for "Midnight Mary" [Raleigh/Wayne] about a year before I produced it on Joey Powers. Rick Nelson recorded one of our songs, "In our own Funny Way", and from time to time I sang background on sessions with him, including one record as the Duprees, "You belong to me", with Ronnie Dante rounding out the group. Things sort of came full circle when I went to Warner Bros Music and bought the copyright to "Here Comes Summer".....Jerry Keller's biggest hit. Regards, Artie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:52:37 -0400 From: Roger Smith Subject: Re: Dickie Goodman Previously: > About Dickie Goodman: One of my collecting specialties is the > genre of record Goodman invented, called "break-ins" or "Flying > Saucers" (after the 1956 single that started it all, Buchanan & > Goodman's "The Flying Saucer, Parts 1 & 2). If any radio station > would let me, I could probably do a whole series about them. Just in case you missed it, Albert Brooks does a funny parody of break-in songs in "Party from Outer Space" on his "A Star is Bought" album. > And about Warren Zevon: I find it a little sad that, even on the > Internet, there hasn't been much discussion of "Like the Seasons", > the early WZ composition that became the B-side of both "Happy > Together" and "Can I Get to Know You Better". Howard (Eddie) > Kaylan seldom sounded better than he did on "Like the Seasons". I guess the songwriter of the b-side gets royalties for every copy sold just like the songwriter on the a-side. That probably explains why so many singles had "throwaway" b-sides written by the a-side's producer or artist. So it's pretty amazing that the b-side for "Happy Together" wasn't a song written by Howard like most of the other Turtle singles. The Turtles really supported new, mostly unknown at the time, songwriters like Warren Zevon and Harry Nilsson. -- Roger -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 13:56:18 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Starsailor Has anybody noticed the melodic similarity between "Silence Is Easy," and Lennon's "Give Peace A Chance"? Moreover, in ambience concept - does SIE remind you of Bonnie Tyler's "It's A Heartache" (except, SIE never leaves the runway)? Just a thought. Mark W. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 14:19:51 -0000 From: David Gordon Subject: Re: The Younghearts James Botticelli wrote: > Sure...luckily I have my rare 45's soul boxes out as I'm > trying to compile Something For Simon (hey, sounds like a > Mancini tune!). The Younghearts tune is called "Hey Love" > b/w "I've Got Dancing Fever" actually recorded in 1980. I > usually label the ballad as the A side, but that's just me. > It's on Soultown Records produced by Bobby Sanders and Larry > Love, Executive procuded by a fella named God. The tune was > written by Ronald Preyer and Larry Love and its numbered > S-3000-A (the ballad side) which could mean it was Soultown's > first release I guess. Thanks James - wonder if "God" is the same as the one who worked with George Kerr - he gets co-production credits on lots of late 70's / early 80's discs ;-) RE Soultown - looks as if Bobby Sanders resurrected the label in the eighties - there was an earlier run of releases on Soultown in the mid-late sixties including a real curio I've just remembered. A version of the Younghearts "I've Got Love For My Baby" by Burt Ward - I haven't seen it or heard it - I suppose this is the guy who played "Robin" in the Batman TV series. Ron Preyer had at least one solo release - "Baltimore" which made the Billboard soul charts in the eighties - does anyone know if this is the Randy Newman song ? Davie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 16:17:30 -0000 From: Rich Subject: Pussycats / Puss n' Boots - Same Group? Going through some of my seldom played CDs and came across a CD "Mynd Excursions" which highlights hard to find songs from the Kama Sutra label. Why I don't play it that much is a question I have no answer for. There is a song on it "I Want Your Love" by a group shown as Puss n' Boots. Notes-writer states group probably was someone's studio invention and never released as far as he could tell. I then found reference on the internet for a song with the same name by a Group called the Pussycats. That song was released on Columbia 43272 and the web site had a picture of the 45. Label stated it was a Kama Sutra Production. It also had a brief description of start of the song and what it sounded like. Gotta to be the same song, but question, are they the same groups? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 14:31:26 -0000 From: David Gordon Subject: Re: Shadow Morton Hi Mick, here's a few more Shadow Morton productions for you: The Blue Project (Verve Forecast 5055, 08 /670 Lost In The Shuffle / Gentle Dreams Prod. Shadow Morton The Vagrants (Atco 6552,1968) And When It's Over Prod. Shadow Morton Bob Vegas (Roulette 4561,1964) Don't Make Me Laugh Prod. Shadow Morton & George Goldner New York Rock and Roll Ensemble (Atco 6584, 06 /68) Pick Up In The Morning / The Thing To Do Prod. John Linde & Shadow Morton The Merchants of Dream (A&M 989, 11/68) Sing Me Life / Dorothy, The Fairy Queen (I've this one listed as being produced / arranged by Jimmy Testa for Shadow Morton Productions.) Davie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 10:57:38 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Dickie Goodman Andrew Jones wrote: > About Dickie Goodman: One of my collecting specialties is the > genre of record Goodman invented, called "break-ins" or "Flying > Saucers" (after the 1956 single that started it all, Buchanan & > Goodman's "The Flying Saucer, Parts 1 & 2). If any radio station > would let me, I could probably do a whole series about them. Those interested in Dickie Goodman will not want to miss the recent bio of him wriiten (and self-published) by his son Jon. It is a harrowing and hair-raising account of a most troubled soul. Part of the fun is that Jon considers Dickie an under- heralded pop genius, virtually claiming that if it weren't for him modern sampling (as well as several other innovations) would never have been discovered! I believe it is called "The King Of Novelty", and can be ordered from http://www.xlibris.com --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2003 18:50:26 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Shadow Morton Mick Patrick writes: > While you were working with Johnny Cymbal did you ever > come across Shadow Morton? I believe he was involved at > Bang Records assisting Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry > run their Tallyrand publishing company. Shadow drank a lot of Scotch at my apartment on 71st Street ...direct from the bottle that he would carry with him. Very intense guy, spoke in riddles. Used to make me uncomfortable. Thought he was a pretty scary dude. I don't remember the exact situation, but he once threatened to have a Mafia guy that he was tied into "take care of me". I'm not going to put that name here, but those that were in the biz back at that time, might recognize the initials L.M. I was concerned enough to go and talk directly to the guy (E.G. knew him too) and asked him straight out. He told me that Shadow was "full of s--t" , not to worry. And I didn't. Anecdotally, as a favor to him, EG and I went down to Brooklyn and worked with his son's band a few times. Not much and it never went anywhere, but there was another band rehearsing next door one night that turned out pretty good, James Taylor I think his name was. Anyway, that's what I was told - could have been Springsteen for all I know. I don't know anything about Shadow helping Jeff and or Ellie run Talleyrand. I doubt it. Actually Talleyrand was Neil Diamond's publishing company - Jeff and Ellie had no part in it. I don't think Jeff and George were close at all. I doubt that they were involved at all. To the best of my knowledge, Shadow was "between hits" at this period. The Shangs were over and Shadow was working out of LM's office in the Brill building and in a studio out on Long Island. Then he made the Vanilla Fudge. I'll tell you this--when I first started working with Ellie, she and Jeff had just signed with Unart Music. First they both had offices in the Brill Building and then they got big offices in the UA building next door to each other. I don't ever remember Shadow being around. The regular crew evenings at my apartment was Mikie, Ellie, Johnny Cymbal, me. one or two others. Shadow came a couple of times. He was drunk everytime I saw him and always hitting on E.G. They knew each other from way back in Long Island and I'm not sure what the deal was, but it wasn't anything she seemed interested in at the time. I know this - he had no compunction about calling her at 2 o'clock in the morning and telling her he wanted to come over. Possibly that was what caused the disagreement between us. I may have asked him to quit doing it. Is that sufficient dishing the dirt? Di da Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 01:35:13 -0000 From: Supreme Dream Subject: The Breakaways CD To any and all girl group fans out there, I just found out that a CD has been released of the Breakaways. They were a UK girl group from the 60's. They had a great sound. "That How It Goes" is a true girl group sound that blows the roof off! They also backed up many an artist. Dusty Springfield used them a lot on her recordings. I believe they were an off shoot of the Vernon Girls. Amazon.com carried their CD which will be released mid- September in the US. If anyone out there knows their history, would love hearing about it. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 14:05:52 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Jerry Keller / The Duprees Artie Wayne: Are you saying that The Duprees didn't sing on "You Belong To Me" or that you simply put some additional backrounds on the record. Please clear this up, if you can. thanks!! Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 19:44:37 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: The Breakaways CD Supreme Dream: > To any and all girl group fans out there, I just found out that > a CD has been released of the Breakaways. They were a UK girl > group from the 60's. They had a great sound. "That How It Goes" > is a true girl group sound that blows the roof off! They also > backed up many an artist. Dusty Springfield used them a lot on > her recordings. I believe they were an off shoot of the Vernon > Girls. Amazon.com carried their CD which will be released mid- > September in the US. If anyone out there knows their history, > would love hearing about it. Happy to help. The best way to find out more about the Breakaways is to buy the CD and read the booklet. You'll find all you need to know right there. The CD is now in stock at Bim-Bam, my favourite mail order dealer. They have a website at: http://www.bim-bam.com If you like, you could always read a review of the CD first, here: http://www.shindig-magazine.com/reviews-aug2003-1.html The Breakaways have been discussed at length here at S'pop. Have you tried searching the Discussion Forum Archive? No? It's the best place to look for girl group info. Here y'are, just click below: http://sitelevel.whatuseek.com/query.go?crid=3139029a15576827&query=breakaways And you've investigated the S'pop website, I presume? S'easy too. Go to the members page at: http://www.spectropop.com/go2/members.html See that nice picture of Phil Spector and Brian Wilson? Click above it to reveal a sidebar menu listing ALL of the S'pop group features. Scroll down to Girl Group Listings and click again. Then scroll down the abecedarian list of girl groups to the Breakaways and click again. Voila! Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 20:23:33 +0100 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: RIP Warren Zevon I believe at one time Warren Zevon was musical arranger/ band leader/ pianist for the Everly Brothers touring group. He not only composed the previously mentioned tunes, but also came up with some excellent material going from the mid 1970's right up to a couple of weeks ago. Unfortunatley this music doesn't belong on this site, but when you reach Z in you local record store he'll be there right by Z Z Top & the Zombies. Ken On The West Coast. (who's hair is just ..........perfect!) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 15:22:21 -0400 From: Keith Subject: Oh, Canada! Hey All, Over the last year or so, I've really been getting into some Canadian soft rock groups, and I'm over the moon at the moment with an LP on Canadian Talent Library by a band called The Metro-Gnomes (with Chad Allen from the Guess Who!). It's basically two girls and a guy (Chad) doing some really brilliant soft rock originals interspersed with "Trains and Boats and Planes" and similar timely fare. There are two tracks in particular that amaze me, "Love Needs A Solid Foundation" and "Im Sorry," just killer late 60's orchestrated pop. The guy who did the arrangements is described on the liner notes as "the Canadian Henry Mancini!" Anybody else have any good Canadian soft rock recommendations? Cheers, Keith -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 20:05:56 -0000 From: cmoeh Subject: Crystals "Uptown" in stereo A few years ago I heard what sure sounded like a true stereo version of the Crystals' "Uptown". I've been looking for the original source of this recording with no success. Does anyone out there have a clue? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2003 17:28:20 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Starsailor Mark Wirtz writes: > Even though the "Silence Is Easy" tune and Starsailor's vocal > performance has gotten under my skin, I cannot listen to the > darn thing anymore.. It turns my stomach and makes me want to weep... Hey Mark, I enjoyed reading your well structured critique of the StarSailor CD but why not tell us how you really feel? Di da, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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