Mystery Island Banana Train Ride presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 1005



________________________________________________________________________
      
               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
________________________________________________________________________



There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. "I'm gonna take this to number one"
           From: Phil Chapman 
      2. Re: Everly's "Two Yanks...."
           From: Andrew Sandoval 
      3. Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project
           From: Keith D'Arcy 
      4. Re: Mary Wells
           From: David Bell 
      5. The Collage,  - does anyone know this group?
           From: Martin Jensen 
      6. Re Jerry Keller
           From: Dan Hughes 
      7. Split Level
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      8. Re: Reparata
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: Jerry Keller
           From: Phil Milstein 
     10. Re: "I'm gonna take this to number one"
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     11. Re: The Collage,  - does anyone know this group?
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     12. Re: Lewis Sisters
           From: Patrick Rands 
     13. Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project
           From: Ted L 
     14. Re: Langley Schools Music Project, Wendy & Bonnie
           From: Phil Milstein 
     15. Re: Jerry Keller
           From: Geoff Kaiser 
     16. Re: The Collage,  - does anyone know this group?
           From: Paul 
     17. Re: Jerry Keller
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     18. Re Jerry Keller
           From: Tony 
     19. RE: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project
           From: Kurt Benbenek 
     20. Re: Langley Schools Music Project, Wendy & Bonnie
           From: Art Longmire 
     21. Re: Kapp
           From: Tim Viney 
     22. Re: Del Shannon/Brian Hyland
           From: Peter Lerner 
     23. Re: Kiddie Pop/Sparky
           From: Mark Frumento 
     24. Re: New Aussie girlie collection
           From: Peter Lerner 
     25. Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project
           From: Ken Bell 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Message: 1 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:54:49 +0100 From: Phil Chapman Subject: "I'm gonna take this to number one" This Monday sees the release of Phil Spector's first production for 23 years, Starsailor's own comeback single, Silence Is Easy. It's a lush, enormously orchestrated statement that suggests Starsailor have come back better than ever, and that Spector has not lost his touch. Eerily, the lyrics refer to paranoia, unfounded rumour, lies and a retreat into silence. Although Silence Is Easy was written before they met Spector, the song could easily be about him. Dave Simpson's full Starsailor interview: http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/fridayreview/story/0,12102,1030803,00.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:28:44 EDT From: Andrew Sandoval Subject: Re: Everly's "Two Yanks...." Billy G Spradlin: >Did this LP ever come out on CD anywhere? Scott Swanson: > It was issued as a 2-fer (with "A Date With") back in 1992 > by another Dutch label, TNT. (I wonder if they have any > connection to the new Rocky Top label?) Anyway, I'm pretty > sure it's out of print now although you might find a copy at > CDEurope or other import shops. The release you speak of is a bootleg - and worse yet - is dubbed from a disc and noise gated. Buy the original vinyl (or Edsel vinyl reissue) and CD version is unlikely until late 2004. Andrew Sandoval -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 05:49:11 -0400 From: Keith D'Arcy Subject: Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project Art Longmire: > One of the earliest kiddie-pop records I heard was one > called "Mill Valley" back in 1970. I later purchased it and > have always liked it very much (wish I could get it on CD). Hi Art, The Miss Abrams & The Strawberry Point 5th Grade Class LP, the one with "Mill Valley," is out on CD from the kind people at Varese. Other great kid rock: Mark Radice's three early 45s for Decca! My absolute fave is "Three Cheers (For The Sad Man)," which sounds like Pet Sounds-era Brian Wilson sung by a 10 year old. He was a total phenom, writing & playing multiple instruments. I really love his LP for Paramount, done in his early teens, where he sounds a lot like Todd Rundgren. Anyone checked out the Las Dillys Sisters 45 of "Sometimes Good Guys Don't Wear White?" Mid 60's LA Garage rock sung by what sounds like three Hispanic ten year old girls. I think at some point Brian Turner at WFMU put together a promo comp CD of all kids' rock, pop & country, as a giveaway if you donated during their fundraising drives. I'll try to get the track list... KD -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 06:02:50 EDT From: David Bell Subject: Re: Mary Wells Simon White: > There really isn't nearly enough Mary talk > on this site you know. I couldn't agree more, Simon. With the various cd releases in the 90s, it seemed that Mary Wells was due for reappraisal and her place in the pantheon of pop/soul history confirmed. Somehow it never came off and she seems to have sunk into some sort of limbo again. Her important sides on Motown, 20th Century, Atco and Jubilee are all available and the silky toughness of her voice is a wonder. I know that I'm a little biased as she is my first love on Motown, although my favourite track by her is Mr. Tough on Jubilee. I've just discovered that she made films for some sort of jukebox for two of her Beatles covers, which are not the greatest of recordings, but I'd love to get hold of them. I saw her perform in the 60s at the height of her Motown powers and then again in the 80s, when her stage show held me enraptured. She came over as a lovely lady and was always very receptive backstage. She wanted all my 8x10s for her autobiography. Mary is sadly missed and it's about time that her recording career was reassessed and her place as "The Girl Goddess of R & B", to quote Dave Godin, confirmed. Best wishes, David. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:48:22 -0000 From: Martin Jensen Subject: The Collage, - does anyone know this group? Hi As a Danish fan of sunshine pop / soft pop, I was intrigued to find an LP by the Collage last time I visited my former hometown. I got it for a ridiculously cheap price from a garage sale, and bought it out of sheer curiosity evoked from the very 60s whimsy cover & and apparent Mamas & Papas like constellation of two female and two male singers (Donna & Jodie, and Jerry and Ron according to the back of the record). Does anyone here know this group? I haven't been able to find anything on them on the net? The music itself is not that special - very lightweight, and the voices of the girls are a bit over the top, almost operatic at times. ;-) I like the opening track 'Lookin' at a Baby', though, and there's also a cover of the Sagittarius track 'Would You Like to Go'. Production work is by Steve Douglas, and Perry Botkin Jr is the arranger, and the label is 'Smash Records'. Info, anyone? And would it by chance be a rare record? I just wonder how it ended up in a garage sale in a tiny Danish town, and where all the other records sold were from the 80s? :-) Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 09:28:37 -0500 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re Jerry Keller Tony asks, > I don't believe that Jerry Keller has yet been mentioned > ... Here Comes Summer .. a #1 chart topper in the UK and > #14 in the US. Whatever happened to him, does anyone know? Nothing current, but I found this on a web site: Jerry Keller b. 20 June 1938, Fort Smith, Arkansas, USA. After moving to Tulsa in 1944 Keller formed the Lads Of Note Quartet in the 50s before joining the Tulsa Boy Singers. He won a talent contest organized by bandleader Horace Heidt which earned him the vocalist job with Jack Dalton's Orchestra. He then spent nine months as a disc jockey in Tulsa before moving to New York in 1956. He recorded a series of demos for record companies before fellow performer Pat Boone introduced him to Marty Mills who became his manager. Keller recorded the self-penned "Here Comes Summer" for the Kapp record label, and it became a US summer hit in 1959. Ironically it only entered the UK charts in late August as the warmer months lapsed into autumn, but it still went to number 1. Follow-ups such as "If I Had A Girl", and "Now Now Now" failed to repeat the success. In 1960, he toured the UK replacing Eddie Cochran in a package tour engagement after Cochran had died in a car crash. Despite the lack of subsequent hits as a singer, his songs charted handsomely for artists such as Andy Williams and the Cyrkle. In 1977, he appeared in the film You Light Up My Life and the following year in If I Ever See You Again. ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:24:59 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Split Level BTW, the Collage brought to mind another 2 guy-2 woman group, Split Level, who had 1 pretty good LP on Dot in '68. "Divided We Stand." Unfortunately they seemed to be over-obsessed with their ability to sing madrigals--otherwise there are some good pop and rockin' tracks on there, such as "Right Track" and "Can't Complain". Superb harmonies. A few of them went on into 7Ts groups, didn't they? I'd be willing to bet this one's not available on CD (they're not alone!) Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:35:29 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Reparata Many thanks to all who contributed to the recent flurry of Reparata & The Delrons discographical information. Excellent work, and much-needed indeed! Did they ever get to release a proper LP? Also, would we be correct in assuming "Hash Brown" is aka Harry Lookofsky? Presuming so, I wonder if that pseudonym helped give rise to his son's adoption of the name "Michael Brown" for his own, much-Storied, music career. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:01:42 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Jerry Keller Tony Bayliss wrote: > I don't believe that Jerry Keller has yet been mentioned > ... Here Comes Summer .. a #1 chart topper in the UK and > #14 in the US. Whatever happened to him, does anyone know? Although it doesn't offer any up-to-date information, a capsule bio, which reveals that Keller was the tour replacement for Eddie Cochran after his 1960 death, appears at http://www.theiceberg.com/artist/24381/jerry_keller.html. Until Tony's inquiry, which spurred me to google the name, I'd always assumed all songs credited (or co-) to "J. Keller" to have been by JACK! --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:55:28 EDT From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: "I'm gonna take this to number one" I couldn't be more thrilled to read this!! What puzzles me, however - how does that tie up with past reports that Spector's Starsailor sessions didn't work out, and that this, in fact, was supposedly the reason why Spector, in his disappointment, slipped back into alcohol and substance abuse after having been "clean" for some time prior?? Anyway, bottom line - Spector is back, and, God knows, we need him to put some Rock back into the Roll! Cheers and salutes!! Mark Wirtz (also back, LOL) http://www.markwirtz.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 11:20:21 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Re: The Collage, - does anyone know this group? I've got the COLLAGE album. A few interesting tracks, otherwise didn't live up to my expectations. Had good voices but not too much production or publicity backing from what I understand. Other Spectropoppers know of (and I can't remember but it's in the archives somewhere!) at least 1 other cover of "Virginia Day's Ragtime Memories", which is probably the best track on the album. I could be mistaken but I think there was one other band by this name also who did only singles, not to be confused with the Smash group, who also put out 1 or 2 45s. - Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:13:50 -0000 From: Patrick Rands Subject: Re: Lewis Sisters Phil Chapman wrote: > Their "You Need Me" is (now) a classic Motown record, and a strange > one for the time. Great use of moody harmonica. I'm very excited to see this discussion here on The Lewis Sisters. They've been one of my favorite groups this year, and I've started to keep a file on them in hopes of someday perhaps putting together a radio spotlight show on them. Their story is fascinating! Everyone for whom I've played He's an Oddball has flipped over that song. I also love the Little Lisa 45, it combines the sweetness of her voice with a kicking rhythmic background quite well. Is there any chance we could cullate a discography of some sort together? Also, if anyone is interesting in sharing more of their music with me, in hopes of me fashioning a future radio show broadcast on them, please send me a message. At this point in time I only have a few soundfiles. Thanks for any help you would like to give me. :Patrick P.S. anyone interested in Brazilian music should tune in to my radio show spotlight on Bossa wondergirl Nara Leao - 90.3 WZBC FM - Boston MA area, or online at http://www.zbconline.com - 09 /12/03 6-7 pm. for those who have never heard of her, you will be in for a real treat. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 09:18:44 -0700 (PDT) From: Ted L Subject: Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project Art Longmire: > Another CD that I didn't hear was one by two sisters named Wendy and > Bonnie that came out a while back, recordings originally done in the > late 60s. Does anybody recommend this, and what does it sound like? "Genesis" is one of my favorite reissues of this new century and gets my full recommendation. Below are my impressions of the Sundazed CD that originally appeared in the (now defunct) Los Angeles based print- zine Vendetta. Hope this helps. Ted Upon first sight, I thought this reissue was being geared towards the 'Incredibly Strange Music' listening audience. Into the initial spin, I imagined this organic record washing up on Stereolabís shores about a decade ago. (The liner notes do reveal that this been a favorite of 'lab's guitarist Tim Gane.) Further listens revealed new aspects, dimensions and layers resulting in an entrancing and enduring sound-- transcending any novelty and/or collector-cult factors. This is competent lite psych soft pop with striking female harmonies floating over a musical foundation built by consummate jazz players. The arrangements are accomplished and are most akin to the 'Astrud Gilberto Album' or moments of Boettcher's Eternity's Children. The bright, breezy and vibrant 'It's What's Really Happening' sounds like it should have been a 1969 Top 40 AM hit on an illuminated flip-number clock radio, while '5 O'Clock in the Morning' has a chilling contrast of eeriness. The demos are so intimate they are like looking through a sliding glass door into the intangible levels of unhindered creativity. Wendy & Bonnie reveal a wise beyond their years knowingness in 'Conventional Man' balanced with a youthful perspective of wonderment found in a San Francisco bicycle ride under the local color and tint of the 'December Sun'. 'Genesis' successfully captures the innate characteristics of an enigmatic time/place with brilliant musicianship and two sisters who expand the songs to the rarified realms of timeless beauty in the larger context. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:50:47 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Langley Schools Music Project, Wendy & Bonnie Art Longmire wrote: > The recent posts on Lisa Miller and Canterbury Records (who > I haven't heard of but sounds intriguing) made me think of a > recent favorite of mine, the Langley Schools Music Project CD > that was compiled from two 1970's LPs of some Canadian > schoolchildren doing some popular songs (including several > written by Brian Wilson). I wondered if anyone else had heard > this and whether you liked it. Here is how I wrote up the Langley release for Bananafish magazine: The salutary effects of Brian Wilson's music were noted as well* a few years later by an obscure music teacher in the tiny rural town of Langley, British Columbia. "The Langley Schools Music Project" (Bar/None) collects two privately-pressed albums Hans Fenger made in the mid-1970s of his students performing a hearty mixture of contemporary hits and Beach Boys titles. With little training in music education and few resources at his disposal, Fenger relied instead on a generous spirit, freewheeling intuition and prairie-wide imagination to guide him in his new occupation. He and his kids stumble headlong into their musical discoveries, with the results a succession of happy accidents adding up to one ecstatic one. According to Fenger's liner notes, to avoid the patronizing nature of traditional children's music he allowed the kids themselves to shape the repertoire. But as readily as we can picture them lobbying for the inclusion of some Bay City Rollers, Fleetwood Mac, Wings and Eagles, one senses their instructor's hand behind such less-visible Wilson fare as "In My Room," "God Only Knows" and "You're So Good To Me," which dot the complexion of this album like beauty marks. The performances are resplendent throughout. Recorded in a gym with but sparse instrumentation, the voices of 60 nine-year-olds reverberate as if off the ceiling of heaven. Balancing the set are three solo numbers, each -- in particular a rendition of "Desperado" so luminous it will reduce Don Henley to a whimpering fool -- an evocative portrait of winsome determination. The most unique touch comes from the one luxury item Fenger was able to procure for the school system, a set of Carl Orff-designed xylophones harmonically configured so that, in Fenger's words, "it's impossible to hit a 'wrong' note." Their chiming tones smooth out the ensemble's edges with a most glorious shimmer, and somewhere Brian Wilson is beaming. *ref. to prior review of Margo Guryan > One of the earliest kiddie-pop records I heard was one called > "Mill Valley" back in 1970. I later purchased it and have always > liked it very much (wish I could get it on CD). Another CD that > I didn't hear was one by two sisters named Wendy and Bonnie that > came out a while back, recordings originally done in the late 60s. > Does anybody recommend this, and what does it sound like? It is a beaut! If I had to pigeonhole it's sound, I'd do so as "California sunshine pop with jazz overtones." It is a bit spotty, but the good tracks are most brilliant indeed. The booklet includes some alluring photos of the girls as grown-ups, and mentions that the younger one had been recruited for The Go-Gos (or was it The Bangles?). --Phil Milstein -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:14:04 -0500 From: Geoff Kaiser Subject: Re: Jerry Keller > I don't believe that Jerry Keller has yet been mentioned ... Here > Comes Summer .. a #1 chart topper in the UK and #14 in the US. > Whatever happened to him, does anyone know? I have no idea, but I do know he co-wrote the song "A Man and a Woman". - Geoff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:47:51 EDT From: Paul Subject: Re: The Collage, - does anyone know this group? Yeh Martin I've got the LP too,though I had to fork out £25 for it, a bit steep but I like the album.I also like the two tracks you mentioned, 'Rainy Blue Memory Day' is also lovely.I've also got some video footage of the group from a '68 edition of American Bandstand doing 'Driftin' & 'Rock'n Roll Music', a single not included on the LP. They were a fabulous looking four piece, pretty weird.Great hair & clothes, very '68.Dick Clark interviews them too, unfortunately the clip is B&W. Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 13:08:48 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Jerry Keller Tony asks, > I don't believe that Jerry Keller has yet been mentioned ... Here > Comes Summer .. a #1 chart topper in the UK and #14 in the US. > Whatever happened to him, does anyone know? I know. In fact, we are currently writing together although we have never met or seen each other face to face. God bless e-mail. He lives in Nashville. His son Jordan is a music biz attorney there. RASHKOVSKY -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:03:57 -0000 From: Tony Subject: Re Jerry Keller Mike Rashkow wrote re. Jerry Keller: > .......we are currently writing together although we have > never met or seen each other face to face. God bless e-mail. > He lives in Nashville. His son Jordan is a music biz attorney > there. Excellent news, Mike, thanks. I always loved "Here Comes Summer", (although I'm not certain that growing up in England we ever really knew what a 'summer' was .. and come to think of it, what was a 'drive-in' and a 'my girl'? At the age then of 16, girls had not yet created the turbulence in my innocent life that they would later). Anyway, I have 45s by Jerry on Kapp, Coral and Capitol, all of which are still played and enjoyed ... Come to think of it, the Capitol single has a nice tie in here as it was written by Jeff Barry .. "Never Wake Up". Cheers Tony -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:08:02 -0700 From: Kurt Benbenek Subject: RE: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project The Langley Schools album is one of the few new, full-priced CDs I've bought in the last 2 years. It is very delightful and real inspiring stuff. Contrary to some of the reviews I've read, it's not really funny or silly or goofy. It's actually very well done and the kids' performances are serious and sometimes so good, it's scary (the percussion's great ...and loud) Unfortunately, this type of quirky children's music is thrown into the 'outsider music' category. Otherwise well-meaning music lovers tend to make fun of or ridicule it. It's important to see this vintage children's music for what it is, in it's own context...and not lump it in with with the music of The Shaggs or Wild Man Fischer (delightful and wonderful as it is). PS: For some reason, I've noticed that the most popular song performed in the children's/high school band category is "MacArthur Park" Kurt Benbenek ----------------------------------- Houseplant Picture Studio http://www.houseplantstudios.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:14:51 -0000 From: Art Longmire Subject: Re: Langley Schools Music Project, Wendy & Bonnie Phil Milstein wrote: > Here is how I wrote up the Langley release for > Bananafish magazine: Hello Phil, That's as excellent a summing-up of the Langley Schools CD as I've seen anywhere. It was the numerous reviews that I read in various publications that originally put me on to this CD in the first place. Although as I've said I do enjoy some children's recordings, I hesitated at coughing up the money for a full-priced CD of something I wasn't sure I would like (in spite of the favorable hype). Not only did I enjoy it, I felt that this recording is a landmark of sorts - so many factors coming together to create brilliant music, as you stated in your review. I especially like the sparse but beautiful instrumentation and the shimmering quality of the children's voices...it's something I never get tired of listening to! And I'm speaking as one who was in numerous childrens singing combos as a youngster - believe me, I was notorious for being a horrible singer, as my fellow songsters never tired of telling me. Thanks also for the assessment of the Wendy and Bonnie CD - I'll be on the lookout for it. By the way, I think the CD was put out by Irwin Chusid who was behind the Langley Schools CD. I used to exchange emails with Irwin regarding children's music (as well as song-poem stuff) and he put some of my comments on the Langley Schools website. I really enjoyed his book "Songs in the Key of Z". Best, Art Longmire -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 19:41:32 +0100 From: Tim Viney Subject: Re: Kapp Apart from their first two 45s ("Sweets For My Sweet" to MERCURY & "Sugar And Spice" to LIBERTY) all of The Searchers' PYE material was licenced to KAPP for U.S. release. Tim -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:30:36 +0100 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Re: Del Shannon/Brian Hyland Ken Bell: > Wasn't Del Shannon one of the people that kept Brian Hyland going? > I remember reading in some liner notes, that Brian had thanked Del > Shannon for being there when he almost gave up. I think Del Shannon's > work from what I have read goes far beyond his actual vocal talents > and deep inside the music industry with several artists." John Henderson: > As has been mentioned, yes it was Del Shannon that got Brian Hyland > to record "Gypsy Woman" at a point in his career when he really needed > another hit. Del had input on the production too, I think." And can I add that Del produced Brian on a splendid version of Leonard Cohen's "So long Marianne", UNI 55287 (interesting that folks, just realised Del went from Leader to parent label Kapp, to other labels, back to UNI which we all know is part of the same outfit. How many other "returners" are there? Peter -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 20:32:04 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: Kiddie Pop/Sparky Art Longmire wrote: > One of the earliest kiddie-pop records I heard was one > called "Mill Valley" back in 1970. I recently got a single by Sparky (great name for a kiddie band!) who were produced by Tommy Oliver. I picked the single up because they cover a song called "Sweet Lies" which was written by John Pantry. I don't know how old the band were but they aren't old enough to be singing about a girl cheating on them. The A-side is "Never Say Never Again" and it's a nice, upbeat, sing-a-long pop song. I know nothing else about Sparky but this web site threatens to tell their story one day.... Oh the suspense! http://parsec-santa.com/celebrity/celeb_pages/sparky.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:34:42 +0100 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Re: New Aussie girlie collection Kingsley Abbott wrote: > There's a new sixties collection of Australian girls > called 'Girls Girls Girls - Australian Female Performers > of the Sixties Volume 1'" Natasha asked: >Any idea where I can get a copy of that Aussie collection? > What else is on it? Well, I got mine from Bim Bam records, http://www.bim-bam.com Hope that helps. Peter -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 30 Aug 2003 05:16:20 -0500 From: Ken Bell Subject: Re: Kiddie Pop, Langley Schools Music Project Kiddie Pop? Is it close to bubblegum, as defined by 1910 Fruitgum Company, Ohio Express? Ken -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents © copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.